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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1986 | JON MATSUMOTO
"RAT IN THE KITCHEN," UB40. A&M. On its previous albums this English band's social-political reggae tended to sound formulaic and dull. But with the quintet's latest and best album, it has finally established its own engaging identity. The songwriting is sharper and more melodic than in the past. Plus the arrangements and tempos are more varied and uplifting.
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NEWS
August 31, 2006 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
FOR two decades beginning in 1978, the live home of reggae music was Reggae Sunsplash, a festival that made its mark in Jamaica with a lineup of the genre's kings, including Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Dennis Brown. Sunsplash landed on the shores of the United States in 1985, stopping at the Greek Theatre to spread its good vibrations every summer through 1996.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1986 | CHRIS WILLMAN
That loping rhythm section, the syncopated guitar strokes, the percolating Third World social commentary--no doubt about it, 'twas indeed a reggae concert that nearly filled the Greek on Tuesday night. You'd hardly know it looking at the crowd, though. The only dreadlocks we were able to spot anywhere among the immediate masses were on a white kid.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The biggest room in reggae's mansion belongs to UB40 nowadays, and it is decorated in soft, pastel shades. The racially integrated English band's pop-reggae reworking of the Elvis Presley ballad "Can't Help Falling in Love" just spent six weeks at No. 1. Its new album, "Promises and Lies," debuted recently in the Top 10. And about 15,000 of its fans packed Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre here on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1986 | JON MATSUMOTO
"RAT IN THE KITCHEN," UB40. A&M. On its previous albums this English band's social-political reggae tended to sound formulaic and dull. But with the quintet's latest and best album, it has finally established its own engaging identity. The songwriting is sharper and more melodic than in the past, and the arrangements and tempos are more varied and uplifting.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Over the past decade UB40 has refined its brand of reggae to the point that it hardly relates to the rest of the genre. Friday at the Universal Amphitheare, UB40 showed neither the will nor the wherewithal to do the job. Not that it doesn't do a job quite well. Its trademark sinewy lope, a knack for the occasional killer hook and an affection for reggae's American soul roots (the focus of the current "Labourof Love II" album) has made it perhaps the most successful reggae band in pop.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The biggest room in reggae's mansion belongs to UB40 nowadays, and it is decorated in soft, pastel shades. The racially integrated English band's pop-reggae reworking of the Elvis Presley ballad "Can't Help Falling in Love" just spent six weeks at No. 1. Its new album, "Promises and Lies," debuted recently in the Top 10. And about 15,000 of its fans packed Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre here on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1985 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
England's UB40 certainly deserves credit--and some respect--for succeeding in selling reggae to a white teen audience that largely ignores the genre's most creative talents. The secret to that success could be found Friday at Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre, where the 10-man multiracial band turned in a modest set that served as background music for a 90-minute dance party. UB40 plays what is essentially generic reggae: lilting and rhythmic but for the most part undistinguished.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The biggest room in reggae's mansion belongs to UB40 nowadays, and it is decorated in soft, pastel shades. The racially integrated English band currently has the nation's No. 1 single with its pop-reggae reworking of the Elvis Presley ballad, "Can't Help Falling in Love." Its new album, "Promises and Lies," debuted recently in the Top 10. And close to 15,000 of its fans packed Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1988 | RICHARD CROMELIN
How can a group as bland as UB40 come from the same city that produced such raucous forces as Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Judas Priest? Why does Chrissie Hynde keep recording duets with this group? Is she into helping the needy? Should a band that thinks it's cool to do a reggae remake of "I Got You Babe" be allowed to exist? Most to the point, why is UB40 so popular with the white-bread, KROQ-bred audience?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The biggest room in reggae's mansion belongs to UB40 nowadays, and it is decorated in soft, pastel shades. The racially integrated English band currently has the nation's No. 1 single with its pop-reggae reworking of the Elvis Presley ballad, "Can't Help Falling in Love." Its new album, "Promises and Lies," debuted recently in the Top 10. And close to 15,000 of its fans packed Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on Friday night.
NEWS
August 19, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Skinny Elvis? Fat Elvis? Bad movie Elvis? Las Vegas Elvis? Elvis in the mall yesterday? All or none of the above may be true, but the one thing that remains constant is Elvis the Hitmaker. RCA still sells a ton of Elvis records. He wasn't the King for nothing. British pop reggae band UB40 has been on top of the charts for the last few weeks with their cover of an Elvis song, "Can't Help Falling in Love." Recording an Elvis song is fully as risky as having Tom Cruise and Mel Gibson in your movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Over the past decade UB40 has refined its brand of reggae to the point that it hardly relates to the rest of the genre. Friday at the Universal Amphitheare, UB40 showed neither the will nor the wherewithal to do the job. Not that it doesn't do a job quite well. Its trademark sinewy lope, a knack for the occasional killer hook and an affection for reggae's American soul roots (the focus of the current "Labourof Love II" album) has made it perhaps the most successful reggae band in pop.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
Frank Sinatra, Tracy Chapman, Billy Idol and the Bolshoi Ballet will be among the acts this year at the Pacific Amphitheatre, according to a schedule released Tuesday by the Nederlander Organization, which books and manages the 18,764-capacity facility. The venue's season got off to an early start March 3 with a Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1990 | Robert Hilburn
Passports and cigarettes (invaluable for barter) aren't the only things that pop stars apparently feel are essential when heading to Russia. There are also video crews and recording equipment. Elton John, Billy Joel, Bon Jovi and the Scorpions have either recorded live albums or made documentaries during their Soviet excursions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1988 | RICHARD CROMELIN
How can a group as bland as UB40 come from the same city that produced such raucous forces as Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Judas Priest? Why does Chrissie Hynde keep recording duets with this group? Is she into helping the needy? Should a band that thinks it's cool to do a reggae remake of "I Got You Babe" be allowed to exist? Most to the point, why is UB40 so popular with the white-bread, KROQ-bred audience?
NEWS
August 31, 2006 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
FOR two decades beginning in 1978, the live home of reggae music was Reggae Sunsplash, a festival that made its mark in Jamaica with a lineup of the genre's kings, including Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Dennis Brown. Sunsplash landed on the shores of the United States in 1985, stopping at the Greek Theatre to spread its good vibrations every summer through 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1990 | Robert Hilburn
Passports and cigarettes (invaluable for barter) aren't the only things that pop stars apparently feel are essential when heading to Russia. There are also video crews and recording equipment. Elton John, Billy Joel, Bon Jovi and the Scorpions have either recorded live albums or made documentaries during their Soviet excursions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1986 | JON MATSUMOTO
"RAT IN THE KITCHEN," UB40. A&M. On its previous albums this English band's social-political reggae tended to sound formulaic and dull. But with the quintet's latest and best album, it has finally established its own engaging identity. The songwriting is sharper and more melodic than in the past, and the arrangements and tempos are more varied and uplifting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1986 | CHRIS WILLMAN
That loping rhythm section, the syncopated guitar strokes, the percolating Third World social commentary--no doubt about it, 'twas indeed a reggae concert that nearly filled the Greek on Tuesday night. You'd hardly know it looking at the crowd, though. The only dreadlocks we were able to spot anywhere among the immediate masses were on a white kid.
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