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NEWS
September 12, 1990 | SUE HORTON
T. E. Lawrence called it "the Atlantis of the sands," and it was so fabled a city that more than 50 years ago British explorer Bertram Thomas scoured the Rub al Khali (Empty Quarter) desert in search of it, until he ran low on food and water and was forced to abandon his search. But now, an eclectic team of explorers led by Nicholas Clapp, a soft-spoken Los Angeles filmmaker, believes it is on the road to finding the lost city of Ubar, deep in the desert of Oman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1998 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flying high in a helicopter over a shimmering Arabian desert, Nicholas Clapp began to wonder whether he wasn't truly crazy after all. Sprawling beneath him was the Rub' al Khali, or Empty Quarter--an endless expanse of forbidding isolation known for its majestic dunes that rise up 60 stories from the desert floor like great ocher-colored waves of rolling sand.
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NEWS
February 5, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The fabled lost city of Ubar, celebrated in both the Koran and "A Thousand and One Arabian Nights" as the center of the lucrative frankincense trade for 3,000 years before the birth of Christ, has been found by a Los Angeles-based team of amateur and professional archeologists.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A three-week reconnaissance mission through an unexplored region of gullies and goat paths in eastern Yemen has yielded an unprecedented wealth of archeological finds, according to the Los Angeles-based team of archeologists that made the discovery. The team reports that it has proved the existence of an ancient frankincense trail from the recently discovered city of Ubar in Oman to the Middle East.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1998 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flying high in a helicopter over a shimmering Arabian desert, Nicholas Clapp began to wonder whether he wasn't truly crazy after all. Sprawling beneath him was the Rub' al Khali, or Empty Quarter--an endless expanse of forbidding isolation known for its majestic dunes that rise up 60 stories from the desert floor like great ocher-colored waves of rolling sand.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Los Angeles-based team that discovered the fabled Arabian city of Ubar, the long-lost "Queen of the Frankincense Trade," has unearthed a second, larger city that was apparently the administrative center of trade in the valuable spice, researchers announced Monday.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicholas Clapp likes to say he stumbled onto the road to Ubar by way of a quirky bookstore in Westwood. It was 1982 and Clapp, an Emmy award-winning documentary filmmaker, was looking for a particular book about the Arabian desert for a possible movie project. The tiny Egyptology bookstore, which has since closed, didn't have what he sought, but the woman behind the counter said she had something better.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A three-week reconnaissance mission through an unexplored region of gullies and goat paths in eastern Yemen has yielded an unprecedented wealth of archeological finds, according to the Los Angeles-based team of archeologists that made the discovery. The team reports that it has proved the existence of an ancient frankincense trail from the recently discovered city of Ubar in Oman to the Middle East.
OPINION
February 2, 1997
Mention archeology and, at least for some of us, up pop mental images of the swashbuckling adventures of Indiana Jones. But in fact what an archeologist needs is not derring-do but a lot of erudition and the imagination to see an elegantly painted wall in a jagged heap of bricks or an inspiring statue in a featureless chunk of rock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve days after the first Christmas, three magi appeared in Bethlehem bearing gifts of "gold, frankincense and myrrh." The gold cited in the Book of Matthew, many experts now believe, was actually golden frankincense, an aromatic resin that was then more precious than even the yellow metal itself. And both the normal frankincense and its golden counterpart probably originated in the recently discovered city of Ubar on the edge of the desolate Ruba'al Khali or Empty Quarter of Oman.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Los Angeles-based team that discovered the fabled Arabian city of Ubar, the long-lost "Queen of the Frankincense Trade," has unearthed a second, larger city that was apparently the administrative center of trade in the valuable spice, researchers announced Monday.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicholas Clapp likes to say he stumbled onto the road to Ubar by way of a quirky bookstore in Westwood. It was 1982 and Clapp, an Emmy award-winning documentary filmmaker, was looking for a particular book about the Arabian desert for a possible movie project. The tiny Egyptology bookstore, which has since closed, didn't have what he sought, but the woman behind the counter said she had something better.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The fabled lost city of Ubar, celebrated in both the Koran and "A Thousand and One Arabian Nights" as the center of the lucrative frankincense trade for 3,000 years before the birth of Christ, has been found by a Los Angeles-based team of amateur and professional archeologists.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | SUE HORTON
T. E. Lawrence called it "the Atlantis of the sands," and it was so fabled a city that more than 50 years ago British explorer Bertram Thomas scoured the Rub al Khali (Empty Quarter) desert in search of it, until he ran low on food and water and was forced to abandon his search. But now, an eclectic team of explorers led by Nicholas Clapp, a soft-spoken Los Angeles filmmaker, believes it is on the road to finding the lost city of Ubar, deep in the desert of Oman.
NEWS
December 13, 1992 | DONALD J. FREDERICK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Despite centuries of belief, gold probably wasn't among those first Christmas gifts of the three wise men. Some scholars think that biblical translations of "gold and frankincense and myrrh" were somehow garbled over time. The gold mentioned as one of the three gifts of the Magi was actually a type of frankincense. Valued at least as much as the precious metal, it had a strong sandalwood-like aroma. "Biblical scholars have suggested that the word gold doesn't refer to the metal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
George Hedges, the Hollywood lawyer to celebrities such as Mel Gibson and Simon Cowell who became a celebrity himself for his discoveries of the fabled ancient city of Ubar and the frankincense trade route in Yemen, died Tuesday at his home in South Pasadena. He was 57 and had been battling melanoma for seven months.
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