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BUSINESS
May 23, 2010
• More than 1 billion GPS receivers are used by consumers and businesses to get around. • ATMs and Wall Street traders use super-accurate atomic clocks on the GPS satellites to time-stamp transactions. • GPS signals can direct "smart bombs" to within a few yards of the target. • Two dozen satellites orbiting in formation constitute GPS. • Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo developed GPS and is overseeing the upgrade.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
The Holy or the Broken Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley & the Unlikely Ascent of "Hallelujah" Alan Light Atria: 272 pp., $25 There's a great scene in Penelope Spheeris' 1992 film "Wayne's World" - find it on YouTube under the title "May i help you riff" - in which an impatient guitar-store employee prevents Wayne from plucking out the opening arpeggios of "Stairway to Heaven" by Led Zeppelin. Pointing with great urgency, the guy directs Wayne's attention to a sign hung on the store's wall: "NO STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN," it reads.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1985
The defense (!) of gasoline-powered leaf blowers by Richard Seeley exemplifies the callous attitude of all who use these machines in residential areas. The issue they ignore is noise , and as a noise-polluter of neighborhoods the leaf blower is unparalleled. The ear-splitting decibel count it produces is at least as bad as a buzz saw, and far worse for its ubiquity and daily usage. This one device has made my formerly peaceful neighborhood little better than an industrial zone.
OPINION
February 1, 2012 | Meghan Daum
Say what you will about the latest Internet video sensation - in which someone lampoons one group of humans or another based on certain conversational proclivities - but if nothing else, we can credit it with bringing mainstream awareness to the word "meme. " That's the term coined by Richard Dawkins for the way evolutionary principles can be used to explain how cultural ideas take hold. It's now basically turned into a fancy way of talking about things that are popular on the Internet.
OPINION
February 1, 2012 | Meghan Daum
Say what you will about the latest Internet video sensation - in which someone lampoons one group of humans or another based on certain conversational proclivities - but if nothing else, we can credit it with bringing mainstream awareness to the word "meme. " That's the term coined by Richard Dawkins for the way evolutionary principles can be used to explain how cultural ideas take hold. It's now basically turned into a fancy way of talking about things that are popular on the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2007
I mourn the passing of the Life magazine I knew in the middle decades of the last century. I contest, however, that its death was, as Tim Rutten supposed, inevitable ["Life as We Knew It," March 28]. Notwithstanding the ubiquity of digital cameras and photo-capable cellphones, I cannot imagine that "popular tastes in media" have changed so much that a well-edited collection of dramatic and insightful photographs is no longer worth publishing. I blame the editors of Life for killing it, and offer as evidence their "Picture of the Week."
OPINION
October 14, 2002
Re "Right and Wrong Shouldn't Be Guesswork," Commentary, Oct. 9: John Balzar is timely and on target in calling for a blue-ribbon commission to reform and update our laws and regulations governing basic honesty in business. I am referring here to laws that mandate full disclosure, transparency, accountability and simple truthfulness. Lying in business has become obsolete and can be safely outlawed. Capitalism thrives on transparency and factual truth, which underlie trust, which is the basis of trade.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN, Gary Chapman is director of the 21st Century Project at the University of Texas at Austin
Early last month, institutions around the world were crippled for several days by a new computer virus called the ExploreZip Trojan horse. A Trojan horse, in computer jargon, is a nasty software program that hides inside a file a user is likely to want to see or open. The ExploreZip virus--more accurately, a computer "worm," which spreads more automatically than a virus--affected machines running Microsoft's Windows operating system and Windows application software.
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is odorless, colorless and quietly lethal. It is carbon monoxide, the deadly byproduct of incomplete combustion and poor ventilation, and it is the leading cause of poisoning death in the United States. When the so-called killer gas took the life of former tennis star Vitas Gerulaitis, 40, in New York last week, public awareness of the threat got a tragic but timely boost. "It's a ubiquitous toxin, recognized since man first brought fire into the home for cooking," says Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
The Holy or the Broken Leonard Cohen, Jeff Buckley & the Unlikely Ascent of "Hallelujah" Alan Light Atria: 272 pp., $25 There's a great scene in Penelope Spheeris' 1992 film "Wayne's World" - find it on YouTube under the title "May i help you riff" - in which an impatient guitar-store employee prevents Wayne from plucking out the opening arpeggios of "Stairway to Heaven" by Led Zeppelin. Pointing with great urgency, the guy directs Wayne's attention to a sign hung on the store's wall: "NO STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN," it reads.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2010
• More than 1 billion GPS receivers are used by consumers and businesses to get around. • ATMs and Wall Street traders use super-accurate atomic clocks on the GPS satellites to time-stamp transactions. • GPS signals can direct "smart bombs" to within a few yards of the target. • Two dozen satellites orbiting in formation constitute GPS. • Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo developed GPS and is overseeing the upgrade.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2007
I mourn the passing of the Life magazine I knew in the middle decades of the last century. I contest, however, that its death was, as Tim Rutten supposed, inevitable ["Life as We Knew It," March 28]. Notwithstanding the ubiquity of digital cameras and photo-capable cellphones, I cannot imagine that "popular tastes in media" have changed so much that a well-edited collection of dramatic and insightful photographs is no longer worth publishing. I blame the editors of Life for killing it, and offer as evidence their "Picture of the Week."
OPINION
October 14, 2002
Re "Right and Wrong Shouldn't Be Guesswork," Commentary, Oct. 9: John Balzar is timely and on target in calling for a blue-ribbon commission to reform and update our laws and regulations governing basic honesty in business. I am referring here to laws that mandate full disclosure, transparency, accountability and simple truthfulness. Lying in business has become obsolete and can be safely outlawed. Capitalism thrives on transparency and factual truth, which underlie trust, which is the basis of trade.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN, Gary Chapman is director of the 21st Century Project at the University of Texas at Austin
Early last month, institutions around the world were crippled for several days by a new computer virus called the ExploreZip Trojan horse. A Trojan horse, in computer jargon, is a nasty software program that hides inside a file a user is likely to want to see or open. The ExploreZip virus--more accurately, a computer "worm," which spreads more automatically than a virus--affected machines running Microsoft's Windows operating system and Windows application software.
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is odorless, colorless and quietly lethal. It is carbon monoxide, the deadly byproduct of incomplete combustion and poor ventilation, and it is the leading cause of poisoning death in the United States. When the so-called killer gas took the life of former tennis star Vitas Gerulaitis, 40, in New York last week, public awareness of the threat got a tragic but timely boost. "It's a ubiquitous toxin, recognized since man first brought fire into the home for cooking," says Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1985
The defense (!) of gasoline-powered leaf blowers by Richard Seeley exemplifies the callous attitude of all who use these machines in residential areas. The issue they ignore is noise , and as a noise-polluter of neighborhoods the leaf blower is unparalleled. The ear-splitting decibel count it produces is at least as bad as a buzz saw, and far worse for its ubiquity and daily usage. This one device has made my formerly peaceful neighborhood little better than an industrial zone.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2009 | Scott Timberg
The documentary filmmaker Ken Burns has a story he clearly loves to tell. He was walking in New York City a few years ago -- on a date -- when he heard a man he'd just passed yell violently back at him: "What about Mingus?!" Preceding the name of the protean jazz bassist was a pungent (and unprintable) expletive. Burns turned to his date and reassured her. "It's just about 'Jazz,' " he said, referring to his 10-part history shown on PBS in 2001, which drew big audiences and critics' complaints that he overlooked key figures.
FOOD
August 3, 2013 | Jonathan Gold
If you follow the peregrinations of local Chinese kitchens, you've probably been hearing a bit about Chengdu Taste lately, a new restaurant specializing in the dishes of its namesake city that was pretty much acclaimed as the best Sichuan restaurant in town from the first days of its opening. When I noted the unavailability of an appetizer translated as "Diced Rabbit With Younger Sister's Secret Recipe," the San Gabriel Valley cognoscenti knew what I was referring to even without a mention of the restaurant's name, and I was sent links to recipes, to articles noting the dish's ubiquity in Chengdu and a short biography of the woman who invented it. (According to Fuchsia Dunlop, second-sister rabbit cubes were popular enough to inspire a Chengdu poet to compose an ode in its honor.)
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