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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1997
If affirmative action is no longer practiced at UC schools, then why are we still counting? JOHN FISHER Hawthorne
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By a Times Staff Writer
For the first time,  the number of Latinos from California offered freshman admission to the University of California was larger than that for whites. Reflecting demographic trends, 28.8% of those admitted to at least one UC campus were Latino, compared with 26.8% white. At 36.2%, Asian Americans again made up the largest ethnic group among admitted students from California. Blacks from California were just 4.2%, a number that officials said was disturbingly low. "It remains a difficult issue for the university," said Stephen Handel, UC's associate vice president for undergraduate admissions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores, Los Angeles Times
Freshman applications to University of California schools for the 2013 school year reached a record high of more than 174,700, with Latinos making up the largest portion of applicants for the first time. All nine undergraduate campuses saw an increase in freshman applicants from the previous year, with a systemwide increase of 10.7%, according to figures released by the UC system Friday. Latino students accounted for 32%. The number of out-of-state and international freshman applicants surged, 15% and 34% respectively, while the number of California students who applied for admission as freshmen grew by a more modest 6.2%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The University of California admitted 43% more out-of-state and international freshmen than last year, significantly boosting its controversial efforts to enroll those higher-paying students, according to data released Tuesday. As a result, officials said they expected the share of the upcoming freshman class from outside California to be somewhat higher than the 12.3% this school year but said the actual proportion remains uncertain because non-Californians are less likely to enroll than resident students.
OPINION
July 16, 2010
Letter of the law Re "Sign law is a tough sell," July 13 Only our virulently anti-business and draconian government would suddenly and selectively crack down on small San Fernando Valley businesses that are merely trying to survive the deep recession, by threatening them uncompromisingly with heavy fines if they don't remove the signs that have helped them survive. All because less than a handful of people complained about the signs being too colorful. No wonder small businesses are fleeing this state for those with more business-friendly governments, and taking their tax revenues with them.
OPINION
September 13, 2008
Re "UCLA's process rights a wrong," Opinion, Sept. 7 As a 1971 graduate of the UCLA School of Engineering, I read with disgust the weak-minded and stale arguments of Darnell M. Hunt in support of UCLA's current attempt to circumvent Proposition 209 with a fraud called the "holistic" admissions policy. Minorities deserve an opportunity to compete in an environment in which they can succeed -- not one in which they start out with a built-in academic disadvantage. Trying to redefine and reinvent the admissions rules is seen by all as a transparent effort to bypass current law. Is this what we want to teach minorities: that the way to achieve your goals is to break the law?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2005 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
University of California leaders, responding to concerns about possible racial disparities in admissions practices, told UC regents earlier this week that a new analysis shows the university to be unbiased in its admissions and in compliance with federal and state law.
OPINION
April 9, 2005
Even in a public university system, admissions can be a quirky thing. At the University of California, an inordinate fuss has been made over whether too many students with below-average SATs have been accepted. They get in partly because they had to overcome significant hurdles in life; one such student was a young veteran of foster homes who supported himself through his senior year of high school and still earned top grades. Last year, Regent John J.
OPINION
November 24, 2003
Re "Study Links UC Entry, Social Class," Nov. 19: How disingenuous of the University of California sociologists to make the debate over UC admissions a debate over class warfare. Admissions standards must be about academically based qualifications. It may be that SAT scores are not as useful as once thought. But to substitute subjective criteria such as whether an applicant's parents went to college or what high school the applicant attended, which have no bearing on qualifications, is outrageous and, in the end, counterproductive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2003 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
In a pointed rebuke of one of their own, several University of California regents publicly chastised Board of Regents Chairman John J. Moores on Thursday for issuing a recent report critical of the university's admissions policies, saying it has harmed individual students and the university itself.
OPINION
November 8, 2003
If the controversy over UC admissions policies has made one thing clear, it's the need for a more transparent application process (Nov. 3). Under the current system, high school students are given only the vaguest description of what admissions officers look for, and several months after mailing their applications receive letters containing a life-altering decision with no explanation behind it. The bickering among the regents, along with the flurry of...
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