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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1991
Moore errs in stating that UC's "acceptance" barrier for community college transfers was raised to between 3.4 and 4.0 grade point average. In fact, community college applicants to Berkeley, the most competitive UC campus, averaged slightly above a 3.3 GPA last year according to the director of admissions. The community college applicants to other UC campuses were admitted with lower average GPAs, depending on the campus and programs to which they applied, while minimum GPA remains at 2.4. With Moore, I am more concerned with the "economic" barriers that UC's higher fee structure presents to lower-income families.
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OPINION
April 22, 2014
Re "California students feel UC squeeze," April 19 When I was a student at UC Santa Barbara, I appreciated the diversity both in terms of ethnicity and geography on campus. Still, I was disturbed to read that non-Californians are being sought for enrollment as a way to boost the University of California system's bottom line. Enrolling students for this reason may actually detract from campus diversity on a socioeconomic level. If the university system is seeking students who can afford to pay $23,000 extra a year, it is inherently seeking out students of more affluent backgrounds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Sharply higher numbers of students from other states and countries applied for admission to the University of California this year, following UC's controversial efforts to recruit more such students for the extra tuition they pay, according to a report released Thursday. At the same time, UC administrators said a new policy that reduced the standardized testing requirements for admission appears to have encouraged more Californians than ever to apply to the university system. The number of non-Californians seeking to become UC freshmen in fall 2012 rose 56% over last year to about 33,000, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014 | By Jason Song
Starting this year, UC Riverside and all other University of California campuses will be tobacco-free, part of a nationwide trend. The campuses are following the lead of UCLA, which barred cigarettes and other tobacco products from campus last year. Former UC system President Mark G. Yudolf called for all campuses to be free of tobacco by 2014. In a survey of nearly 1,700 Riverside students and staff, 84% of respondents said they did not smoke or use tobacco products. Nearly 86% of people who responded said they were exposed to secondhand smoke on a regular basis.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1989
Though well-intentioned, Brown's article misleads readers by presenting facts subjectively. It's true, for example, that Fresno City College sent only one black and four Latinos to UC schools in 1986. But the reason, which Brown fails to note, is because FCC's minorities and non-minorities overwhelmingly favor Fresno State as their "transfer school" because of its convenient location, low cost, and solid reputation. Though Brown may disapprove of their choice, thousands of minority students who've elected to transfer to Fresno State have earned degrees there and prospered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The state auditor Thursday called on the University of California to be more transparent about how it distributes money among its campuses and asked why four campuses with high proportions of black, Latino and Native American students receive lower per-capita funding than some other UC schools. The auditor's report also criticized UCLA for "wrongfully" using $5 million from a student activities fund to construct a student center and for plans, since abandoned, to tap the fund further to renovate the Pauley Pavilion basketball arena.
NEWS
October 17, 1986
Responding to predictions that University of California enrollment will swell by 21% by the turn of the century, a member of the UC Board of Regents proposed building a 10th campus, to be located in Fresno. Leo S. Kolligian, a Fresno attorney, asked his colleagues to study the idea of a campus to serve the "neglected" Central Valley residents, but the board, meeting at UC Irvine, took no action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1988
Larry Gordon wrote a well-researched article "Eastern Colleges: Recruiters Offer West a Taste of Ivy" (Part I, Dec. 13). However, I would like to offer a somewhat different perspective based on personal experiences shared by my son and myself. Many local teen-agers are increasingly interested in Eastern schools as it is becoming almost impossible for them to get into the big name UC schools due to overenrollment and competition. My son, a junior with a 3.6 honor-roll average and a star athlete, has little to no chance of making UC Berkeley, and may not qualify for UCLA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2000
Re "UC, Take Down the 'Not Wanted' Signs," Commentary Jan. 31: Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante noted that despite a 30% increase in admission offers to top minority students at UC medical schools, enrollment of those students dropped 12.5%. Bustamante suggests that the drop in enrollment is due to the students' perception that they are "not wanted." Would a student apply for admission if he did not intend to enroll if admitted? Surely, the failure to enroll must be because of admissions to more prestigious schools, scholarships, etc. In my view, the increase in admissions offers shows that equal access is being achieved notwithstanding the UC anti-affirmative action policies.
OPINION
September 26, 2007 | By Vikram Amar and Richard H. Sander
IMAGINE, FOR A MOMENT, that a program designed to aid disadvantaged students might, instead, be seriously undermining their performance. Imagine that the schools administering the programs were told that the programs might be having this boomerang effect -- but that no one investigated further because the programs were so popular and the prospect of change was so politically controversial. Now imagine that an agency had collected enough information on student performance that it might, by carefully studying or releasing the data, illuminate both the problem and the possible solutions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2012 | Larry Gordon
The moon already cast a glow on the irrigation canals that cross the UC Merced campus. Despite the hour, about 80 students slipped into lecture hall seats for an engineering class that starts at 8:30 p.m. and goes until nearly 10. Sophomore Kenneth Simpliciano said he wished the statistics and dynamics class were earlier in the day so he didn't need energy drinks to get through it. Still, he's glad that UC Merced is stretching the use of its facilities...
NEWS
May 14, 2012 | By C. Judson King, Robert J. Birgeneau and John Wilton
The Times' April 30 editorial, " The danger of UC autonomy ," which challenges our proposal for modernizing University of California governance, deserves a response. First, the editorial predicts that allowing each campus more autonomy would risk turning highly sought-after schools such as UC Berkeley and UCLA into institutions that serve most wealthy students, while qualified middle-class applicants would be drawn to other, less competitive UC schools. The editorial doesn't mention the recently announced Middle Class Access Plan for Berkeley, whereby no UC Berkeley student from a family in the $80,000 to $140,000 household income range would pay more than 15% of family income for tuition, books and living expenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Sharply higher numbers of students from other states and countries applied for admission to the University of California this year, following UC's controversial efforts to recruit more such students for the extra tuition they pay, according to a report released Thursday. At the same time, UC administrators said a new policy that reduced the standardized testing requirements for admission appears to have encouraged more Californians than ever to apply to the university system. The number of non-Californians seeking to become UC freshmen in fall 2012 rose 56% over last year to about 33,000, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The state auditor Thursday called on the University of California to be more transparent about how it distributes money among its campuses and asked why four campuses with high proportions of black, Latino and Native American students receive lower per-capita funding than some other UC schools. The auditor's report also criticized UCLA for "wrongfully" using $5 million from a student activities fund to construct a student center and for plans, since abandoned, to tap the fund further to renovate the Pauley Pavilion basketball arena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The University of California's recent decision to boost its enrollment of out-of-state students for the extra tuition they pay was evident in the higher number of non-Californians offered freshman admission for the fall, according to data released Monday. Applicants from other states or countries made up 18.1% of the 72,432 students admitted to at least one of the nine undergraduate UC campuses, up from 14% last year and 11.6% in 2009, the figures show. The trend was most dramatic at UC Berkeley and UCLA, where 31.2% and 29.9% of freshman admission offers went to non-Californians.
OPINION
June 30, 2010
The Supreme Court on Monday sided with the UC Hastings College of Law in San Francisco against a Christian group that argued — persuasively, in our view — that it had been denied recognition because it refused to accept members who wouldn't abide by its religious principles. Now that Hastings has won its case, it should take a fresh look at whether student organizations should be required to accept members who don't share their views. At Hastings, "registered student organizations," though not endorsed by the law school, have access to its e-mail systems and bulletin boards and can use the school's logo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2010 | By Teresa Watanabe
Authorities have deported the legal immigrant parents of more than 88,000 U.S. citizen children in the last decade, according to a report released Wednesday. The report, published by the UC Berkeley and UC Davis law schools, found that the majority of parents were deported for what it described as "minor criminal convictions" now classified as aggravated felonies, including nonviolent drug offenses, simple assaults and drunk driving. One parent was deported after selling $5 worth of drugs.
OPINION
December 15, 2009
T he U.S. Supreme Court agreed last week to referee a dispute between a University of California law school and a Christian student group that claims it's being discriminated against -- in the name of antidiscrimination. The Christian Legal Society, which requires its members to forswear sex outside heterosexual marriage, is contesting the refusal of UC Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco to afford it the privileges enjoyed by other student groups. It's tempting for believers in equality for gays and lesbians (ourselves included)
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