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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2002 | LISA LEFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
His Ventura College buddies may be sweating this spring as they wait to hear whether they have been accepted for transfer to a University of California campus in the fall, but not chemistry major Armando Hernandez, who secured his scholastic future months ago. In August, Hernandez, 20, signed a contract with UC Santa Cruz that guarantees him admission if he maintained a 2.8 grade point average and took certain classes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2001
Proposals for law schools at UC Irvine and UC Riverside should be shelved until the state emerges from its economic slump, the top academic officer of the state university system has recommended. UC Provost C. Judson King made that recommendation in a letter to the California Postsecondary Education Commission. The panel has no formal power to block the projects, but its findings are considered by University of California regents, whose approval would be required for any new law schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2000
Re "UC, Take Down the 'Not Wanted' Signs," Commentary Jan. 31: Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante noted that despite a 30% increase in admission offers to top minority students at UC medical schools, enrollment of those students dropped 12.5%. Bustamante suggests that the drop in enrollment is due to the students' perception that they are "not wanted." Would a student apply for admission if he did not intend to enroll if admitted? Surely, the failure to enroll must be because of admissions to more prestigious schools, scholarships, etc. In my view, the increase in admissions offers shows that equal access is being achieved notwithstanding the UC anti-affirmative action policies.
NEWS
December 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
The School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis has lost its full accreditation. Instead, it has been assigned "limited" accreditation status for two years by the American Veterinary Medical Assn. The school was ranked No. 1 in the country last year by U.S. News & World Report, but its antiquated buildings doomed its accreditation status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1998
Re "End the Garage Sale at University of California," Commentary, April 20: It seems that we have too many of those rotten wealthy people cluttering up the UC system and we must get rid of at least some of them. (We will keep some to pay the bills.) The objective, of course, is to increase the minority enrollment in our UC schools. Gary Byrne's and Richard McKenzie's solution is to raise tuition so that it is equal to the "top-tier" private schools and, presto, the appropriate number (I'm sure our two geniuses will tell us exactly how many)
NEWS
March 17, 1998 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Offering the first look at University of California undergraduate admissions in the post-affirmative action era, three UC campuses Monday reported drops of up to 45% in the number of blacks and Latinos admitted as freshmen for next fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Real estate magnate Donald L. Bren became one of the leading donors in University of California history with the announcement Wednesday of a $15-million gift to operate a new graduate school of environmental science and management at UC Santa Barbara. UC officials said the gift from the 65-year-old owner of the Irvine Co. was the largest to date for the Santa Barbara campus. Bren lives in Newport Beach.
NEWS
October 6, 1997 | DANNY FEINGOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joseph Collier knew that he wanted to go to UCLA Law School. But, with reports of dwindling minority admissions at UC law programs, the 31-year-old black student from Ohio was apprehensive. Then Collier found out how much UCLA wanted him. After receiving his acceptance letter he was courted heavily by the dean, faculty members, alumni and the African American law student organization. "I felt that the university was making a lot of effort to make me come," says Collier.
NEWS
July 15, 1997 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Adding to the controversy over the University of California's ban on affirmative action, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights confirmed Monday that it is investigating allegations that the admissions policies at UC's three law schools are racially discriminatory. In a letter sent late last week to UC President Richard C.
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