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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The surprise selection of former U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano to head the UC system has fueled criticism over the secret selection process. Supporters of a more open method say that better decisions are made when three or four finalists for a university presidency or chancellorship are formally identified to the public. At that point, faculty and students could have a chance to meet them before a final selection. Though widely praised, the selection of Napolitano in July also came as a shock to many outside a relatively small circle of UC regents and other officials.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
After a meeting that lasted until dawn Wednesday, the UCLA undergraduate student government voted against a measure that would have urged the UC system to sell off stocks of companies that do business with the Israeli military and profit from Israel's occupation of Palestinian territories. The highly emotional issue attracted more than 500 people to the UCLA meeting and the public comment lasted nearly nine hours, according to the Daily Bruin, the campus newspaper. The council moved to a secret ballot and then voted 7-5 against the divestment measure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
SAN FRANCISCO -- The UC regents on Thursday confirmed U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano as the next president of the 10-campus system during a sometimes rowdy meeting marked by a protest from students and others who contend Napolitano expanded deportations of undocumented immigrants. The regents set Naplitano's salary at $570,000 a year, which is $21,000 less than the pay for current UC president Mark G. Yudof and avoids a political furor about executive pay inflation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Michael V. Drake, who as chancellor of UC Irvine enhanced the school's reputation as a first-rate research institution and boosted enrollment, was named Thursday as the new president of Ohio State University. Drake's appointment was announced at a meeting of the Board of Trustees in Columbus. He was the consensus candidate, officials said. "He is exactly the right leader at the right moment in the university's history as we address the challenges of affordability and access, while building on the already strong momentum we have generated at Ohio State in increasing the university's academic excellence," board Chairman Robert H. Schottenstein said.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Peter Taylor
In arguing that the individual campuses of the University of California would be better served by having a looser relationship with a drastically downsized UC office of the president, UCLA history professor David Myers relies in part on the late Clark Kerr to make his case. In a May 31 Times Op-Ed article , Myers cites the former UC president's observation that the "university-wide system has no alumni, no students, no faculty, no sports teams, no one to cheer for it. " Myers' selective quotation doesn't actually reflect Kerr's broader view on this subject.
OPINION
July 16, 2009 | Robert Cooter and Aaron Edlin, Robert Cooter is a professor of law and Aaron Edlin is a professor of law and of economics, both at UC Berkeley.
The University of California remains outstanding. By some rankings, three of its schools are among the top 20 universities in the world. But for how long? The budget has been cut by 20%. The Board of Regents votes today on UC President Mark Yudof's plan to deal with the shortfall. Yudof's original proposal included salary cuts across the board of 8% or furloughs leading to an equivalent reduction. This at a time when UC salaries are already 10% or more below those at peer institutions.
OPINION
February 23, 2011 | By Peter Baldwin
In both of the two most respected global rankings of universities, the University of California system supplies at least 10% of the top 50 institutions worldwide. In the Academic Ranking of World Universities put out by Shanghai Jiao Tong University (usually referred to as the Shanghai index), seven of the UC's 10 campuses rank in the top 50. In Britain's Times Higher Education World University Rankings, the UC system has five campuses in the top 50 with a sixth four notches lower. This is an extraordinary achievement for a publicly financed system of higher education, particularly for one that was founded just a century ago. If we add in the three private California universities (Caltech, USC and Stanford)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The nomination of Janet Napolitano, the U.S. secretary of Homeland Security, to be the next president of the University of California signals a desire for change at the sprawling 10-campus system and hopes that a highly visible political personality may be able to raise more money and play a more influential role in Sacramento and Washington. Besides being the first woman expected to be named president in UC's 145-year history, Napolitano is thought to be only the second true outsider and the first without any record of helping to run a university.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2001
Re "UC Regents Told of Bleak '02-03 Outlook," Nov. 16: The story about cutbacks for the UC system is distressing. What was not particularly distressing was the news that normally top-paid administrators, usually at the vice chancellor level on up, will no longer get their raises, hovering in the 25% range. Poor babies. As a former staffer at UC Irvine, I was appalled each autumn when Vice Chancellor Wendell Brase would e-mail the "good news"that the regents had approved our 1% raise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1988
Your editorial contains some rather ill-considered suggestions for the UC system. In particular, your suggestion that "Berkeley and UCLA should continue as graduate-research universities, but the other UC campuses . . . must rededicate themselves to teaching first, research second" is quite shortsighted. As a graduate student who is completing his Ph.D. at UC Irvine, and who attended UCI as an undergraduate, I feel that to follow your suggestion would injure both the undergraduate and graduate studies at UC. When I applied for admission to UC as an undergraduate, the major attraction for me was the opportunity to work under persons striving to extend the bounds of human knowledge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
The number of applicants for next fall's freshman class in the UC system rose by 6.2% over last year, driven mainly by a continuing boost in interest from out-of-state and international students, according to data released Friday. Applications from Californians to at least one UC campus totaled 99,761, just 632 or 0.6% more than the previous year. This came as the population of high school seniors in the state is declining, the report showed. However UC has been recruiting heavily outside of California to gain the higher tuition revenues paid by non-residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details.
Susan Desmond-Hellmann, chancellor of the medical-oriented UC San Francisco since 2009, is resigning to become chief executive of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, a charity that has been active worldwide on health issues. Desmond-Hellmann will leave UC in March, and a search committee for her replacement is expected to begin work in January, according to an announcement Tuesday by UC system President Janet Napolitano. The dean of the campus medical school, Sam Hawgood, will serve as UCSF's interim chancellor until a permanent chancellor is hired.  An oncologist, Desmond-Hellmann previously held high executive positions at biotechnology giant Genentech Inc. and was key in the development of cancer therapies there, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Some surgeries were postponed, some student dining hall hours reduced and some classes canceled as UC's medical centers and academic campuses reported an uneven impact of a one-day labor strike Wednesday. The walkout by thousands of service workers, patient care employees, student tutors and others was said to be peaceful with no arrests at the nine campuses and five medical centers affected throughout the state. UC Santa Cruz appeared to be the most heavily affected: Demonstrators blocked the two campus auto entrances and, as a result, many operations such as libraries and cafeterias there were significantly reduced or shut for the day, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
An unusual effort by the UC system to raise scholarship money through online crowd-funding tactics -- including promises by faculty and students to lead hikes, wash cars and wear kooky costumes -- has garnered $1.3 million, officials said Wednesday. The formal part of the six-week Promise for Education campaign ended Oct. 31, and about 4,000 people donated to it via social media. “We are really pleased. In addition to the amount of money raised, just seeing the visibility for scholarships was important,” said Jason Simon, UC's executive director of marketing communications.
SPORTS
October 24, 2013 | By Chris Foster
California has shared two conference football championships since 1960. Its basketball team has won one title during that time. Now the Bears sit atop the Pac-12 Conference schools in the least desirable standings. Golden Bears athletes have the worst graduation rates in both sports, according to an NCAA report released Thursday. The Bears graduated only 44% of its football players who came to school from 2003-06. Only 38% of its basketball players had earned a degree in that time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
A former UC Davis police officer who received worldwide notoriety for pepper-spraying campus protesters two years ago will be receive $38,055 in workers' compensation after claiming he suffered depression and anxiety as result of the public outcry. John Pike, who had filed for the compensation from the University of California system, also cited the stress he endured from death threats he received after the incident. Pike was fired in July 2012, after being on paid administrative leave for eight months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Larry Gordon and Jason Wells
An attorney supportive of the protesters who were pepper-sprayed two years ago at UC Davis criticized a recent decision to pay the former campus police officer involved in the incident $38,055 in worker's compensation. As the result of a claim filed with the University of California system, John Pike will receive the compensation for depression and anxiety he says he suffered after receiving death threats when his identity became known. Bernie Goldsmith, a Davis lawyer supportive of the protesters, told the Davis Enterprise  that Pike's workers' comp settlement sent a dangerous message.
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