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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Michael V. Drake, who as chancellor of UC Irvine enhanced the school's reputation as a first-rate research institution and boosted enrollment, was named Thursday as the new president of Ohio State University. Drake's appointment was announced at a meeting of the Board of Trustees in Columbus. He was the consensus candidate, officials said. "He is exactly the right leader at the right moment in the university's history as we address the challenges of affordability and access, while building on the already strong momentum we have generated at Ohio State in increasing the university's academic excellence," board Chairman Robert H. Schottenstein said.
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OPINION
May 14, 2013
Re "Reagan and the fall of UC," Opinion, May 10 Seth Rosenfeld argues that then-Gov. Ronald Reagan's opposition to the 1960s radicalization of the University of California campuses - Berkeley in particular - was the main driver in the decline of the UC system. He overlooks that this very radicalization has diminished the value of a UC education. In the 1950s, when the UC system was at its peak, students were "well groomed and complacent" (to use Rosenfeld's words). They were in college to learn, not to protest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2010 | By Richard Marosi, Los Angeles Times
When protesting students spilled into University of California campus courtyards in March, Ricardo Dominguez took to the streets in his own way — digitally — leading a march to the online office of the UC president. The bespectacled associate professor triggered a software program that continuously reloaded the home page of UC President Mark G. Yudof's website. "Transparency," hundreds of protesters wrote, over and over again, in the search box of the home page.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1998 | GARY C. BYRNE and RICHARD B. McKENZIE, Gary C. Byrne is president of a Newport Beach investment firm. Richard B. McKenzie is a professor in the Graduate School of Management at UC Irvine and an adjunct fellow at the Center for the Study of American Business in St. Louis
The precipitous decline in the count of African Americans and Latinos in the 1998 freshmen class at UC Berkeley has been heralded as a political problem in need of a political solution, namely the resurrection of affirmative action. The Board of Regents of the UC system and state legislators would be well advised to see the problem in economic terms. Education is a service in high demand, commanding a high price.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
In the nearly two decades since California voters banned the use of affirmative action in college admissions, the two most competitive University of California schools - UCLA and Berkeley - saw enrollments of black and Latino students plunge and have struggled to recover. The UC system has adopted a number of recruiting and admissions measures to legally work around the 1996 ban, Proposition 209. But the enrollment of these two groups has not completely rebounded. At UCLA, for example, African American freshmen dropped from 7.1% of the class in 1995 to 3.6% last fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1989
As a graduate student in the UC system and having served for nine months on a tenure and promotions committee at UC Irvine, I find Miles' argument both misleading and wrongheaded. First, he gives no supporting evidence for the "distressingly large" number of tenured deadwood in the system, something that in my experience with the actual promotions committee caseload was very rare. For what I found to be the few tenured UC faculty who fit his image of deadwood, Miles' promotes a wrong-headed vision of education by insisting that UC system students be exposed to even more of their teaching.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1992
President David Gardner of the UC system is correct about the proposal that UC professors should conduct class more than the present six hours per week. It certainly would "fundamentally change the character of the institution," as he says ("UC Chief Blasts Call to Increase Teaching Load," March 3). Professors' promotion and tenure would be based more on teaching than on research. The enormous glut of useless articles in academic journals would decrease. The money saved could go to needy students.
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