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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1997
The Sept. 14 Orange County Voices op-ed article, "For-Profit Plan Wrong Idea for UCI Med Center," concludes that a cooperative effort is key to the survival of UCI Medical Center and the UCI College of Medicine. We agree. UCIMC's strains are shared by all local hospitals, physicians and community clinics who attempt to balance financial solvency with their struggle to care for underfunded Medicare, Medi-Cal, county indigent and uninsured patients. Without a county hospital, the burden to maintain a health care "safety net" for all residents--rich and poor alike--falls on private health care providers, most notably UCIMC.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1997
The Sept. 14 Orange County Voices op-ed article, "For-Profit Plan Wrong Idea for UCI Med Center," concludes that a cooperative effort is key to the survival of UCI Medical Center and the UCI College of Medicine. We agree. UCIMC's strains are shared by all local hospitals, physicians and community clinics who attempt to balance financial solvency with their struggle to care for underfunded Medicare, Medi-Cal, county indigent and uninsured patients. Without a county hospital, the burden to maintain a health care "safety net" for all residents--rich and poor alike--falls on private health care providers, most notably UCIMC.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1997
It is refreshing to see the state finally realizing that keeping UCI Medical Center a public and independent institution may better serve the public's interest (July 9). At least one of UCIMC's current suitors has long been known as a predator which has shown little hesitancy in closing up a hospital if it will boost its bottom line at another. Enabling UCIMC to enroll a larger number of indigent patients will not only provide the patients with better care but will enhance the learning experience of our medical school's students and residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1997
It is refreshing to see the state finally realizing that keeping UCI Medical Center a public and independent institution may better serve the public's interest (July 9). At least one of UCIMC's current suitors has long been known as a predator which has shown little hesitancy in closing up a hospital if it will boost its bottom line at another. Enabling UCIMC to enroll a larger number of indigent patients will not only provide the patients with better care but will enhance the learning experience of our medical school's students and residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1985
Having been associated with the Orange County Medical Center and the UC Irvine Medical Center for 20 years, I was particularly pleased with the recent articles on the quality of the medical care and devotion of the medical and support services at UCIMC. Those of us who have been affiliated with this institution for many years have labored long and hard to improve the quality of the care rendered to the patients who have come to our doorstep. Unfortunately, not all people involved in the finances of the institution are interested in quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989
The plight of the poor and the necessity for medical research and education have come into horrible conflict in our county. Orange County and the state are relying on an institution whose primary purpose is to expand knowledge, teach physicians and improve health care for all of us. The UCI Medical Center cannot be expected to carry the burden of indigent health care. How tragic it would be if health care in Orange County deteriorated. How precarious our lives would become if our only Level 1 trauma center closed, our nationally recognized burn center shut its doors, our extraordinary neonatal intensive care facility no longer saved our children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1989
In reading the article (June 5) on the dangerous overcrowding at the obstetrics unit of the UCI Medical Center, I was somewhat amused to read the statements by Michael Stephens, the administrator of Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach. Stephens said he was uncertain whether the action by UCIMC (turning away women in labor due to overcrowding) is legal. He is quoted as saying, "As health care providers, we certainly have an obligation to patients . . . instead of telling them to go elsewhere."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1988 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
UCI Medical Center will report to the UC Board of Regents this week that it is plunging back into red ink because of a high percentage of poor patients whose care is not fully reimbursed by the state or the county. The medical center's annual report, to be released at a regents meeting Thursday and Friday at UC Davis, mentions no specific deficit figure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1987 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
The cost of treating poor patients will put UCI Medical Center into debt by up to $9 million this year, some of which may not be recovered from the state, hospital director Leon Schwartz said Thursday. Gov. George Deukmejian's newly signed state budget provides up to $8 million to cover the possible $9-million deficit at the hospital, Schwartz said. In 1983-84, the medical center suffered multimillion-dollar deficits that similarly necessitated special state bailouts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1988 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Concerned about overcrowding and its public image, the UCI Medical Center in Orange will not renew its $2.5-million county contract for operating a jail ward, hospital officials said Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1989
In reading the article (June 5) on the dangerous overcrowding at the obstetrics unit of the UCI Medical Center, I was somewhat amused to read the statements by Michael Stephens, the administrator of Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach. Stephens said he was uncertain whether the action by UCIMC (turning away women in labor due to overcrowding) is legal. He is quoted as saying, "As health care providers, we certainly have an obligation to patients . . . instead of telling them to go elsewhere."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989
The plight of the poor and the necessity for medical research and education have come into horrible conflict in our county. Orange County and the state are relying on an institution whose primary purpose is to expand knowledge, teach physicians and improve health care for all of us. The UCI Medical Center cannot be expected to carry the burden of indigent health care. How tragic it would be if health care in Orange County deteriorated. How precarious our lives would become if our only Level 1 trauma center closed, our nationally recognized burn center shut its doors, our extraordinary neonatal intensive care facility no longer saved our children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1988 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Concerned about overcrowding and its public image, the UCI Medical Center in Orange will not renew its $2.5-million county contract for operating a jail ward, hospital officials said Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1988 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
UCI Medical Center will report to the UC Board of Regents this week that it is plunging back into red ink because of a high percentage of poor patients whose care is not fully reimbursed by the state or the county. The medical center's annual report, to be released at a regents meeting Thursday and Friday at UC Davis, mentions no specific deficit figure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1987 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
The cost of treating poor patients will put UCI Medical Center into debt by up to $9 million this year, some of which may not be recovered from the state, hospital director Leon Schwartz said Thursday. Gov. George Deukmejian's newly signed state budget provides up to $8 million to cover the possible $9-million deficit at the hospital, Schwartz said. In 1983-84, the medical center suffered multimillion-dollar deficits that similarly necessitated special state bailouts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1985
Having been associated with the Orange County Medical Center and the UC Irvine Medical Center for 20 years, I was particularly pleased with the recent articles on the quality of the medical care and devotion of the medical and support services at UCIMC. Those of us who have been affiliated with this institution for many years have labored long and hard to improve the quality of the care rendered to the patients who have come to our doorstep. Unfortunately, not all people involved in the finances of the institution are interested in quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1997
In your Aug. 24 editorial, "It Requires Patients," you outline several of the challenges currently facing the UCI Medical Center and describe several of its attempts to remain viable in a rapidly changing health care industry. As you suggested, community-based solutions to UCIMC's problems are preferable. UCIMC has historically been a valuable part of the safety net in Orange County and has served many of the county's poor and uninsured residents. In the past, the poor had very little choice but UCIMC.
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