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Ucla Aids Institute

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Eleven years after a UCLA researcher became the first person to identify the syndrome now known as AIDS, the university is establishing an institute aimed at increasing the public visibility of AIDS research and treatment at the school. The UCLA AIDS Institute, which will coordinate the work of dozens of researchers university-wide, comes in part in response to some scientists' concerns that AIDS efforts were poorly synchronized and that public support for research is dwindling.
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NEWS
June 7, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The AIDS virus is much more likely to be transmitted through oral sex than researchers had previously believed, according to a new study of monkeys. If confirmed, the results would contradict the conventional wisdom among heterosexuals and homosexuals that this form of sex is safer than anal or vaginal intercourse.
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NEWS
June 7, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The AIDS virus is much more likely to be transmitted through oral sex than researchers had previously believed, according to a new study of monkeys. If confirmed, the results would contradict the conventional wisdom among heterosexuals and homosexuals that this form of sex is safer than anal or vaginal intercourse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Eleven years after a UCLA researcher became the first person to identify the syndrome now known as AIDS, the university is establishing an institute aimed at increasing the public visibility of AIDS research and treatment at the school. The UCLA AIDS Institute, which will coordinate the work of dozens of researchers university-wide, comes in part in response to some scientists' concerns that AIDS efforts were poorly synchronized and that public support for research is dwindling.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2004
James Taylor will headline "Songs for a New Resolution," a concert Monday at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre to benefit the UCLA AIDS Institute's vaccine and microbicide program. Arnold McCuller, Brandi Carlile, Deborah Falconer and Brandon Fields will also perform at the show, which will be hosted by actress Anna Maria Horsford. Tickets are available at www.musicaids.org and at the theater: (323) 939-1128.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Benefit Premieres: The world premiere of Warner's new Mel Gibson-Jamie Lee Curtis-Elijah Wood movie "Forever Young," Thursday night at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, will benefit Santa Monica's Ocean Park Community Drop-in Center and Hollywood's Recovery Center. . . .
NEWS
May 11, 1995
UCLA has been awarded $4 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to study gay and bisexual men infected with HIV or AIDS. The study, called the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, began in 1984 as part of a national study of the disease. Male participants are given exams twice a year and answer questions about their lifestyle, illness and treatment.
HOME & GARDEN
April 5, 2007 | Lisa Boone
SHOW houses can be experimental affairs, places where interior designers test ideas with wild abandon. The just-opened Metropolitan Home showcase, however, reflects its tony locale in the "bird streets" of the Hollywood Hills: modern, classic and tastefully restrained, with not one eye-roller in sight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1996
The UCLA AIDS Institute and Drew University in Los Angeles will share a $100,000 grant to study ways to help poor and minority HIV-infected people benefit from new care for the disease. "Historically, these populations have had limited access to health care, limited economic and employment opportunities and limited mental health services," said Dr. Ronald Mitsuyasu of UCLA.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | PAUL MORSE
Averaging 80 miles a day, some 1,500 cyclists tackled intense terrain and route conditions along the 510-mile Pallotta TeamWorks Alaska AIDS Vaccine Ride. On Aug. 27, riders from around the globe journeyed from Fairbanks to Anchorage, cycling through Alaska's mountain passes, up and down windy roads and through grueling snowstorms, chilling winds and torrential rain. The six-day journey took riders to elevations of up to 3,300 feet. Riders raised $4.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Gays and lesbians who want to come out of the closet on Friday--National Coming Out Day--can place a free phone call anywhere in the country, courtesy of the Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Center. The hours for the "Call Out" are 4-7 p.m. at the center, 1625 N. Schrader Blvd., Los Angeles, says Mike Ausiello, a spokesman. (No reservations are needed; for more information call [213] 993-7640.) National Coming Out Day began in 1988, but this is the first "Call Out."
NEWS
August 1, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
UCLA researchers have discovered that even mild stimulation of the immune system, such as a flu vaccination, appears to accelerate the growth of HIV. Dr. William O'Brien and his colleagues at the UCLA AIDS Institute report in the August issue of the journal Blood that their findings suggest that severely debilitated victims of acquired immune deficiency syndrome should not be immunized with the vaccine.
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