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BUSINESS
March 25, 2009 | David Pierson
Wall Street may be seeing glimmers of a recovery, but UCLA economists are coming out with a new forecast today that offers a grim picture of the year ahead. Nationwide, the unemployment rate will worsen -- peaking late next year at 10.5%. And in California, which has been battered by tumbling housing, retail and manufacturing sectors, the jobless rate will soar to 11.9% by mid-2010, the latest UCLA Anderson Forecast says.
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BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | Shan Li
The ongoing drought in California could dampen employment growth in coming years and have a ripple effect on several industries in the state, according to a UCLA report released Wednesday. Economists said in the quarterly forecast that arid conditions in 2013, the driest year on record for the Golden State, could diminish the fishing and manufacturing sectors in the state. However, the effect depends on whether the drought is "normal" or the beginning of "a long arid period. " California's employment could be suppressed about 0.2% during the next few years because of the drought, the report concluded.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 2010 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
California stands to gain some jobs this year but recovery will be sluggish, and the state's inland areas will bear the brunt of the continuing economic pain, according to a forecast scheduled to be released Tuesday by UCLA's Anderson School of Business. The state's unemployment rate will average 12.1% this year, economists said, and will not return to single-digit levels until 2012. "We're going to have slow growth this year, accelerating in 2011 and 2012," said Jerry Nickelsburg, senior economist with the UCLA Anderson Forecast.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By Shan Li and Andrew Khouri
California continues to be a story of two economies: coastal regions with healthy job growth and inland areas that are still struggling to recover, according to a UCLA report released Thursday. UCLA economists said in their quarterly forecast that coastal counties stretching from Marin to San Diego have enjoyed employment gains that outpaced the U.S. In contrast, inland areas such as the San Joaquin Valley and the East Bay are showing little or even negative growth. Years of economic turmoil have especially been hard on the Inland Empire, which includes Riverside and San Bernardino counties.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By Shan Li and Andrew Khouri
California continues to be a story of two economies: coastal regions with healthy job growth and inland areas that are still struggling to recover, according to a UCLA report released Thursday. UCLA economists said in their quarterly forecast that coastal counties stretching from Marin to San Diego have enjoyed employment gains that outpaced the U.S. In contrast, inland areas such as the San Joaquin Valley and the East Bay are showing little or even negative growth. Years of economic turmoil have especially been hard on the Inland Empire, which includes Riverside and San Bernardino counties.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2012 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. housing market is becoming the leading source of strength for the long-sluggish American economic recovery, outpacing both business investment and exports. But even with the return of that crucial linchpin, job growth is expected to remain weak next year, a new report says. Job growth will be muted in coming months as employers turn to automation to perform tasks and look for highly skilled workers to fill available jobs, said Edward Leamer, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast.
REAL ESTATE
September 24, 2006
"Buyers Play Wait and See," Sept. 10, quoted Edward Leamer of UCLA Anderson Forecast. He has been forecasting a falling sky since he took that position. Anyone who paid heed to his Chicken Little forecasts over the last several years has suffered significant opportunity costs. Can't you find someone to quote who actually has some skin in the game and isn't locked up in an ivory tower? DALIA WOOD Belmont
BUSINESS
September 26, 2004
Regarding "Some Economists See Risk of a Downturn," Sept. 8: How scary. Sell the stocks. Put the house on the market. But then, as I read further, the article explains that the UCLA Anderson Forecast says that there is only "a 10% chance of a recession" and that "the odds of such an unpleasant event are slight." With a 90% probability of growth and no recession, how did you ever come up with such a deceptive and misleading headline? Glynn Morris Playa del Rey
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2001
Robert M. Williams, a retired business economics professor and founder of the UCLA Anderson Forecast, died Thursday of heart failure. He was 88. Williams, who served on UCLA's business school faculty for more than 30 years, opened the economic forecasting operation now known as the UCLA Anderson Forecast in 1952. The center remains one of the nation's few university-based economic forecasting groups, and its predictions are followed by business analysts across the country.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Christopher Thornberg is founding partner of Beacon Economics, a Los Angeles-based economics consulting firm. Since its founding in 2007, Beacon has provided economic analysis and forecasting for cities, counties and corporate clients. He also worked as chief economic advisor to the state Controller's Office from 2008 to 2012. While he was at the UCLA Anderson Forecast, he began sounding the alarm about an impending housing market crash - and the ensuing recession.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2013 | By Cale Ottens
Commercial real estate industry leaders remain optimistic about the California market, according to a new report published Wednesday.  Allen Matkins, a California law firm, and UCLA Anderson Forecast publish the report twice a year to help predict future commercial real estate rental and vacancy rates.  The organizations polled a panel of California real estate professionals in the development and investment sectors of the industry to...
BUSINESS
July 10, 2013 | By Cale Ottens
As the economy improves, commercial real estate industry leaders are increasingly optimistic about a surge in the California market over the next three years or so, a new report said. Experts said they expect the nonresidential market will keep growing steadily for the next three years but start to slow after 2016 or 2017. There will still be growth, the report said, but at a slower rate. The conclusions are based on a survey of selected California real estate professionals in the development and investment sectors of the industry.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Government workers usually weather economic downturns with little damage, but that hasn't been the case with the Great Recession of 2008-09 and its aftermath. However, things may be starting to look up: After remaining flat for the previous 11 months, the government part of the California economy added a net 8,400 jobs in May, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics figures. One factor is that with a new, balanced state budget approved and in the black, schools, community colleges and state universities have a more secure funding source and can bring back pink-slipped teachers.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2013 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- The nation kept up its moderate but steady job growth in May as employers added 175,000 net new positions, slightly higher than the prior month, the government reported Friday. The unemployment rate edged up to 7.6% from 7.5% in April. That was the first increase since the year began with a jobless figure of 7.9%, but the rise was partly because more people reentered the job market last month -- a sign that workers may be feeling more hopeful about their hiring prospects.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Christopher Thornberg is founding partner of Beacon Economics, a Los Angeles-based economics consulting firm. Since its founding in 2007, Beacon has provided economic analysis and forecasting for cities, counties and corporate clients. He also worked as chief economic advisor to the state Controller's Office from 2008 to 2012. While he was at the UCLA Anderson Forecast, he began sounding the alarm about an impending housing market crash - and the ensuing recession.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Orange County's economy - a standout in Southern California - is expected to accelerate through 2015, as the region's better-than-expected job growth drives the county's housing recovery, according to a UCLA report released Tuesday. Recent revisions from the state's Employment Development Department showed that Orange County gained more jobs than originally estimated. Since February 2012, employers' payrolls grew 2.6%, adding 35,200 net jobs, according to state figures. California payrolls, in comparison, grew 2.1% during the same period.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2004 | Bill Sing, Times Staff Writer
Economists at UCLA have invoked the B-word again. In an outlook to be formally released today, forecasters say California and the nation are beset by a housing "bubble" that will depress construction next year, slowing the nation's economic recovery. Yet the fallout from the bubble in California won't be devastating, according to the UCLA Anderson Forecast.
OPINION
April 12, 2007
Re "Is L.A.'s middle class coming back?" Current, April 8 United Way's Bill Pitkin rightfully questions the newly released UCLA Anderson Forecast, which reports that income inequality in Los Angeles declined from 2000 to 2005. Pitkin points out that L.A. vastly lags the rest of country in some important personal wealth measurements. He also states that the loss of aerospace jobs in the 1990s precipitated the loss of many middle-class jobs. Thankfully, I left the aerospace industry before the downturn.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. economy is ready to stage an earnest comeback this year - led by housing starts and auto sales - and California stands to grab a large proportion of the gains, UCLA economists said Wednesday. Although employment growth slowed at the end of last year, the employment picture this year is expected to brighten, helping the U.S. and California shake off their economic doldrums, according to the quarterly UCLA Anderson Forecast. Join us for a live video chat at 1:30 p.m. on the state of the California economy.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. economy is ready to stage an earnest comeback this year - led by housing starts and auto sales - and California stands to grab a large proportion of the gains, UCLA economists predict. Although employment growth slowed at the end of last year, the employment picture this year is expected to brighten, helping the U.S. and California shake off their economic doldrums, according to the quarterly UCLA Anderson Forecast released Wednesday. Despite recessions in many Eurozone nations and a slowing in exports, the U.S. economy "seems poised for real growth," said David Shulman, a senior economist with the Anderson Forecast.
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