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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although a Texan will soon be in the White House, "Walker, Texas Ranger" is riding off into the sunset after eight years patrolling Saturday nights. The Chuck Norris action series about a modern-day Texas Ranger will officially end its run on CBS this spring, the actor confirmed in an interview. Norris, who doubles as the program's executive producer along with his brother, Aaron, stressed the decision was his own.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1994
A recent conference on children and computers raised issues that should concern every responsible official, educator and parent. For if one thing is clear about the information superhighway--and little else is clear--it is that the computer revolution isn't going to go away. Neither, of course, is society's solemn obligation to educate its children as best it possibly can.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1995
The first of a projected three annual reports on violence on prime-time network television by UCLA's Center for Communication Policy has found that while levels of brutality, mayhem and bloodletting are not as bad as some fear, there is ample room for reducing the gore and destruction. Even casual channel surfers should have no trouble agreeing with the second part of that conclusion.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | PANCHO DOLL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not often you hear people say, "Doggone it! There's just not enough public access TV on." Yet an Ojai group is gearing up a campaign to create a media network for public access channels across the county. "Our main purpose is to create a telecommunications center in Ojai," said Carol McCartney, a documentary filmmaker on the board of the newly minted Ventura County Media Network. "We've been talking with the schools about ways we could bring multimedia into the classroom."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1994
As the hoopla surrounding television's new fall season escalates, so too does the seemingly unending debate over the extent, nature and dangers of violence on TV and in movies. That we live in an increasingly brutal world seems beyond dispute. And that movie makers, television producers and video game designers have, in recent decades, "pushed the envelope" in depicting murder and torture is also self-evident. But beyond agreement on these basics, consensus evaporates.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UCLA researchers are expected to unveil today plans for an ambitious, long-term study designed to track the social consequences of the Internet and its expanding role in consumers' lives. The project will involve periodic surveys of thousands of households in as many as 18 countries and has the financial backing of technology giants including America Online Inc. and Microsoft Corp.
NEWS
November 29, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Americans are abandoning television for cyberspace--a trend that's being fueled by the spread of faster Internet connections, which have enticed even devout couch potatoes to spend more time online, according to a new report on Internet use. The 95-page report, published by the UCLA Center for Communication Policy, found that Internet users watch TV 4.5hours less each week than Americans who don't use the Internet. The study found that television viewing decreases as Net experience increases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1996
Uneasy over viewer discontent with sex and violence on TV, network bosses appear poised to offer a rating system on the content of their programs. Some critics are dismissing the move as self-serving or a preemptive strike against the possibility of government-imposed ratings. However, ratings could mark a historic shift for the networks, which traditionally have made content decisions on economic grounds--what sells--rather than on taste and quality.
OPINION
June 30, 2003
Democratic presidential hopeful Howard Dean is barely registering 6% support in the latest national Gallup poll, but the former Vermont governor's voracious campaigning on the Internet isn't being easily dismissed. With more than 39,000 Dean volunteers signed up on the Internet's meetup.com, he is getting his support faster and cheaper than any other candidate. Meetup.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what amounts to a repudiation of the current elected regime at the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, Bryce Zabel was elected chairman of the organization Wednesday night and will oversee the nonprofit group responsible for handing out the nighttime Emmy Awards as it heads into a significant window in its history.
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