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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to improve on past surveys that emphasized bullet rounds and body counts, a new industry-funded study of televised violence will assess whether broadcast blood and gore are artistically defensible or merely gratuitous, its sponsors said Wednesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Network television's handling of violence within entertainment programming continued to improve last season, despite a disturbing rise in mayhem-laden "reality" specials, according to a report issued Tuesday by the UCLA Center for Communications Policy. The third annual study, sponsored by the four major networks, found half as many prime-time network series raised frequent or occasional concerns about violence compared to the first survey in 1995.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Network television's handling of violence within entertainment programming continued to improve last season, despite a disturbing rise in mayhem-laden "reality" specials, according to a report issued Tuesday by the UCLA Center for Communications Policy. The third annual study, sponsored by the four major networks, found half as many prime-time network series raised frequent or occasional concerns about violence compared to the first survey in 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to improve on past surveys that emphasized bullet rounds and body counts, a new industry-funded study of televised violence will assess whether broadcast blood and gore are artistically defensible or merely gratuitous, its sponsors said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For half a century the Voice of America held a virtual monopoly in telling America's story--warts and all--to the world. And from Africa to the Soviet Union, millions of listeners came to rely on VOA as a truthful, accurate source of news. But the end of the Cold War and the democratization of previously closed societies has brought vast changes to international broadcasting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1996 | SUSAN SHAW
The music throbs. Scenes splash onto the television screen, MTV-style. Handguns glisten, holstered on hips. A handgun fills a full frame alluringly. Gun manufacturers advertising on television? No, it's the commercial for a film "updated for the '90s" about two star-crossed teenage lovers. Since most of us know Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet," we can imagine what role handguns will play.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1996 | DAVID HOROWITZ, David Horowitz is president of the Los Angeles based Center for the Study of Popular Culture
The presidential campaign has stirred up some troubling political winds that are headed, ominously, in the direction of the entertainment industry. Indeed, Hollywood seems to be a favorite scapegoat of both ends of the ideological spectrum this election season. First, Sen. Bob Dole castigated Hollywood for "dealing in nightmares of depravity"--this in a year when the Golden Globes for best pictures went to "Sense and Sensibility" and "Babe."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1994 | Compiled for The Times by James Blair
When President Clinton appeared on MTV recently, a young woman asked him what style of underwear he preferred--briefs or boxer shorts. Clinton answered, politely, that he wore briefs. Both the question and the response created a controversy over whether the President, or any public official, should be asked or respond to that kind of question.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was decades in the making. It's a dauntingly complicated piece of legislation, some of whose finer points escape even the hundreds of lobbyists and congressional aides who have been working on it full time during the final, painful lurch to the finish. Even now that it's about to become law, it is the kind of bill that makes the most devout policy wonk wince.
NEWS
May 2, 1998 | GREG BRAXTON and BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the wake of having inadvertently broadcast a suicide, and still dealing with the outcry from viewers and critics, several local television stations Friday were reevaluating their live coverage policies. But none of the news directors said they would cease live coverage of freeway chases or other potentially dangerous events, only that they would try to prevent the airing of such violent conclusions.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
News Corp. President Peter Chernin confessed at a media conference earlier this month that the company's Fox network had grown too reliant on so-called "reality" programs, comparing the genre to "heroin" Fox injected when in need of a quick ratings fix.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Jerry Springer," with episodes like "Sexy Scenes Caught on Tape" and "Guests Reveal Their Secret Lovers," now ranks near the top of the syndicated talk-show standings. Fox attracted its biggest Tuesday night audience in months with the video mayhem specials "World's Scariest Police Chases" and "World's Deadliest Swarms."
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