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February 12, 2001 | Lee Romney
Los Angeles community development guru Denise G. Fairchild is in Tennessee today doing something she hadn't dreamed of a week ago: team teaching with former Vice President Al Gore. Gore recently announced his plans to develop a curriculum in "family-centered community building" with help from UCLA faculty. Fairchild, founder and president of the Los Angeles-based Community Development Technologies Center, has a long career in the field and also teaches at UCLA.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Could Los Angeles prosper without electricity from fossil fuels? Could the city shun water imported from the Sierra Nevada, even as a changing climate brings hotter days and a declining snowpack? Those are some of the questions being tackled by a new research initiative at UCLA that seeks to confront and adapt to climate change at the local level. The project, to be announced Friday, aims to unite more than 60 faculty members from a range of disciplines around an audacious goal: shifting the Los Angeles region to 100% renewable energy and local water by 2050 without harming biodiversity.
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NEWS
April 4, 1991
Six UCLA faculty members have been elected fellows of the prestigious Council of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. They were among 280 chosen nationwide for 1991. The UCLA honorees are: * Robert Coombs, director of the Office of Education at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute, an expert on medical education. * James Lake, professor in the Molecular Biology Institute, who studies the evolution, structure and function of ribosomes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2012
Robert Morgan Fink Biochemist at UCLA Robert Morgan Fink, 96, a retired UCLA biochemistry professor whose groundbreaking research with his biochemist wife included developing a new technique in the late 1940s to study the thyroid, died Wednesday of natural causes at his Pacific Palisades home, said Suzanne Coppenrath, one of his two daughters. He was a pioneer who "is remembered as a very good scientist who did important work," said Elizabeth Neufeld, former chairwoman of the department of biological chemistry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.
NEWS
September 24, 1987
Merlin C. Wittrock, chairman of the UCLA Graduate School of Education's educational psychology division, has received the American Psychological Assn.'s E.L. Thorndike Award for his "superlative contributions to the science of learning and teaching." Wittrock has been a member of the UCLA faculty since 1960.
NEWS
October 25, 1990
The UCLA Department of Theater will present the premiere of "Summer Vacation Madness," a new adaption of the Carlo Goldoni trilogy at the university's Ralph Freud Playhouse Nov. 7 to 18. The play, a look at status-consciousness, also will be featured in a production by the Mark Taper Forum at the John Anson Ford Theater in Hollywood from Nov. 30 to Dec. 9. General admission tickets will cost $10, $7.50 for UCLA faculty, staff and senior citizens and $5 for students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1989
Superior Court Judge Abby Soven has issued a preliminary injunction prohibiting harassment of UCLA faculty members at their homes and other disruptive activities by Last Chance for Animals, an anti-vivisection group opposed to the use of animals in scientific research. The injunction issued May 26 specifies that Last Chance for Animals and six of its leaders cannot threaten, intimidate, harass or annoy UCLA faculty at their homes; break into or block UCLA facilities; interfere with or obstruct the teaching, research or other functions of the Westwood campus, or destroy any property belonging to the regents of the University of California.
NEWS
June 1, 1989
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Abby Soven has issued a preliminary injunction prohibiting harassment of UCLA faculty members at their homes and other disruptive activities by Last Chance for Animals, an anti-vivisection group opposed to the use of animals in scientific research. The injunction, issued May 26, specifies that Last Chance for Animals and six of its leaders may not threaten, intimidate, harass or annoy UCLA faculty at their homes; break into or block UCLA facilities; interfere with or obstruct the teaching, research or other functions of the campus, or destroy any property belonging to the regents of the University of California.
NEWS
March 10, 1989
An 88-year-old UCLA engineering professor emeritus, known for his unrelenting love of learning, leaped to his death from his 12th-floor West Los Angeles apartment Thursday morning, police said. The body of Daniel Rosenthal was found on the sidewalk in the 11700 block of Wilshire Boulevard shortly before 6 a.m., Detective Fred Kahl said. Kahl said Rosenthal left a note to his daughter, Lucy Dale of West Los Angeles, declaring that he could "no longer bear the idea of becoming a useless vegetable."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
Dr. William K. Summers, the Alzheimer's disease researcher embroiled in a protracted wrangle with federal officials over his work with the experimental drug THA, has received a partial vindication from a UCLA faculty committee that reviewed his work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
UCLA faculty leaders on Thursday narrowly approved a controversial plan to wean the campus' signature MBA program off state funding and have it survive on tuition and donations. The move was viewed by many around UC as a possible turning point in how California's public universities should respond to years of state budget cuts. Some said the proposed change at the Anderson School of Management's full-time MBA program may start a trend, particularly among business and law schools that are able to charge high fees and have wealthy alumni to help support them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2012 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
UCLA faculty leaders are scheduled to decide Thursday whether the Anderson School of Management should end all reliance on state funding for its flagship master's degree program and instead rely on tuition and donations. Supporters of the much-debated proposal for the full-time MBA program say it is a necessary reaction to declining state revenues. They contend that it will give administrators more flexibility, encourage more private donations and redirect about $8 million a year mostly in state funds to other campus divisions that are less able to gain financial independence.
OPINION
January 22, 2006 | Saree Makdisi, Saree Makdisi is a professor of English and comparative literature at UCLA.
'UCLA STUDENTS: Do you have a professor who just can't stop talking about President Bush, about the war in Iraq, about the Republican Party, or any other ideological issue that has nothing to do with the class subject matter? It doesn't matter whether this is a past class, or your class from this coming winter quarter. If you help expose the professor, we'll pay you for your work." This grotesque offer appeared last week on a new website taking aim at members of the UCLA faculty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2006 | Stuart Silverstein and Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writers
A fledgling alumni group headed by a former campus Republican leader is offering students payments of up to $100 per class to provide information on instructors who are "abusive, one-sided or off-topic" in advocating political ideologies. The year-old Bruin Alumni Assn. says its "Exposing UCLA's Radical Professors" initiative takes aim at faculty "actively proselytizing their extreme views in the classroom, whether or not the commentary is relevant to the class topic."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2003 | Stuart Silverstein and Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writers
Even as fighting wound down in Iraq, some UCLA faculty members registered a protest Monday against the U.S. invasion and issued a plea for establishing a representative government there answerable to the United Nations. But, not surprising on a campus, there was also a small protest against the faculty protest, with some Republican students mocking both its substance and timing.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2001 | Lee Romney
Los Angeles community development guru Denise G. Fairchild is in Tennessee today doing something she hadn't dreamed of a week ago: team teaching with former Vice President Al Gore. Gore recently announced his plans to develop a curriculum in "family-centered community building" with help from UCLA faculty. Fairchild, founder and president of the Los Angeles-based Community Development Technologies Center, has a long career in the field and also teaches at UCLA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1993
In response to "UCLA Strikers End Fast; Compromise Reached," June 8: I am proud of my Mexican ancestry, but I don't need UCLA or any state agency to help me learn about my cultural heritage. If I feel the need to know about my true culture, all I have to do is pick up a book or go back and visit the country of my roots. Mexico will always be there as a living reminder and teacher. Let's all wake up to the reality that this multicolored melting pot we live in is now the new culture for us all. Our energies would be better spent in coming together instead of pulling ourselves apart, or else we will never find peace.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | LARRY GORDON, Times Education Writer
UCLA biology professor Richard Siegel thought that a course about AIDS would be popular among undergraduates. So he reserved Moore Hall's 474-seat auditorium, the largest lecture hall on campus. However, even that big room proved wildly inadequate. More than 2,000 students tried to enroll in the class, and 550 were finally admitted, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1993
In response to "UCLA Strikers End Fast; Compromise Reached," June 8: I am proud of my Mexican ancestry, but I don't need UCLA or any state agency to help me learn about my cultural heritage. If I feel the need to know about my true culture, all I have to do is pick up a book or go back and visit the country of my roots. Mexico will always be there as a living reminder and teacher. Let's all wake up to the reality that this multicolored melting pot we live in is now the new culture for us all. Our energies would be better spent in coming together instead of pulling ourselves apart, or else we will never find peace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1993 | LARRY GORDON and MARINA DUNDJERSKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Protesting UCLA's recent decision not to give Chicano studies full departmental status, demonstrators occupied the faculty center for several hours Tuesday, breaking windows and damaging computers and artwork. Police arrested about 90 protesters, including 10 on misdemeanor counts and the rest on felony vandalism charges. UCLA officials estimated damage at $35,000 to $50,000.
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