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October 25, 2010
UCLA Film and Television Archive: 'Out of the Past' Screening Series: 'Lonesome' When: 7:30 p.m. Monday Where: James Bridges Theater, UCLA Info: For more information, http://www.cinema.ucla.edu
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Even after nine decades as an actor, Norman Lloyd loves to perform - even if it's for an audience of one. During a recent interview, Lloyd was brandishing the cleaver used in "Man From the South," the landmark 1960 episode of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" starring Steve McQueen and Peter Lorre that Lloyd directed. The ironically macabre tale revolves around a young gambler who makes a gruesome bet with an elderly man to win the man's convertible. If the gambler's lighter lights 10 times straight he will win the car, but if it doesn't the man will cut the gambler's pinkie finger off with a cleaver.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2011 | Kenneth Turan, Film Critic
"I want to be gay, I want to be free," the stunning young woman says, vivacious, casually amoral, all but blistering the screen. "Life is short and I want to live it while I'm alive. " The actress is Jean Harlow, and the bitter irony is that she lived only eight years past that moment of dialogue in Howard Hughes' legendary "Hell's Angels," dying of kidney failure at age 26 in 1937. Yet in that short span of time Hollywood's original platinum blond created an impressive body of work that is shockingly little seen today.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
By 1980, John Landis had a string of successes under his belt - including "The Kentucky Fried Movie," "Animal House" and "The Blues Brothers" - but the writer-director had long been unable to get his script for "An American Werewolf in London" off the ground. Landis had written the script in 1969 as a teenager. The screenplay earned him a number of writing jobs in the ensuing years, Landis recalled this week, but "everyone, literally unanimously, had the same response, which was either 'this is too funny to be frightening' or 'this is too frightening to be funny.' And I kept saying, 'it's both.'" Finally, Universal, home to many horror classics, released the $10-million picture in 1981, and it took in more than $30 million at the domestic box office (about $86 million in today's dollars)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
There are plenty of usual suspects in the UCLA Film & Television Archive's expansive three-month Spencer Tracy film retrospective. Titled "That Natural Thing," the festival opens Saturday evening at the Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood with Tracy's 1960 drama, "Inherit the Wind," directed by Stanley Kramer, which brought the actor an Oscar nomination as an attorney based on Clarence Darrow. Over the months, cinephiles can watch the two-time Oscar-winning actor in classic films made at MGM such as 1936's "San Francisco," which brought him his first Academy Award nomination; 1937's "Captains Courageous," which earned him his first Academy Award as a colorful Portuguese fisherman, and 1938's "Boys Town," for which he received his second Oscar as Father Flanagan, the founder of Boys Town.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Jamaa Fanaka, who emerged as a dynamic black filmmaker with his gritty independent 1979 film "Penitentiary" and later made headlines with his legal battles alleging widespread discrimination against women and ethnic minorities in the film and television industry, has died. He was 69. Fanaka was found dead in his apartment in South Los Angeles on Sunday, said his daughter Tracey L. Gordon. The cause of death has not been determined, but she said it probably was the result of complications of diabetes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
I've been writing about the incomparable UCLA Festival of Preservation for nearly 20 years, and every time a new edition appears, I fear I'll run out of fresh adjectives to describe the UCLA Film & Television Archive's gift for restoring the widest possible spectrum of fascinating and hard-to-see cinema. I'm clearly getting low on superlatives, but UCLA has not run out of films for its festival, which opens Thursday at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater with Robert Altman's "Come Back to the 5 & Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
I love the smell of preservation in the morning. The rest of the day, too, if it comes to that. So it's a pleasure to announce that the UCLA Film and Television Archive's one-of-a-kind Festival of Preservation opens for business Friday night with a knockout new print of one of the killer classics of film noir, Joseph H. Lewis' "Gun Crazy. " It's too bad the concept of preservation has such a musty sound, because what it means in practice is that today's audiences can experience the most unusual, the most entertaining and exciting treasures from the entire range of cinema's past, all brought back to life by the archive's team of crack preservationists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Elegant and economical - with plot, action and character precisely balanced and pared down to iconic essentials - the legendary westerns directed by Budd Boetticher, produced by Harry Joe Brown and starring Randolph Scott are as good as their reputation. Which is saying a lot. If you love westerns, or wonder why others do, these five films speak loud and clear. Known collectively as the Ranown cycle (a mash-up of Randolph and Brown's names), these films are the heart, and the soul, of the splendid UCLA Film & Television Archive series "Ride Lonesome: The Films of Budd Boetticher," which opens Friday at the Hammer Museum's Billy Wilder Theater in Westwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
By 1980, John Landis had a string of successes under his belt - including "The Kentucky Fried Movie," "Animal House" and "The Blues Brothers" - but the writer-director had long been unable to get his script for "An American Werewolf in London" off the ground. Landis had written the script in 1969 as a teenager. The screenplay earned him a number of writing jobs in the ensuing years, Landis recalled this week, but "everyone, literally unanimously, had the same response, which was either 'this is too funny to be frightening' or 'this is too frightening to be funny.' And I kept saying, 'it's both.'" Finally, Universal, home to many horror classics, released the $10-million picture in 1981, and it took in more than $30 million at the domestic box office (about $86 million in today's dollars)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
How do you represent a hundred years of a nation's moviemaking, especially when the country is one as vast and complex as China? In what it's calling a "preliminary" sampling, the UCLA Film & Television Archive is offering Angelenos the chance to experience a striking array of selections of Chinese cinema, from the silent gems of Shanghai's Golden Age to recently unearthed midcentury satires and more familiar art-house hits such as 2000's "In the...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2013 | By Susan King
As both a producer and a director, Stanley Kramer was fearless. As a scrappy young independent producer in the late 1940s, he bought the rights to Arthur Laurents' "Home of the Brave," the hit 1946 Broadway play which exposed anti-Semitism in the military during World War II. But Kramer decided to up the ante, transforming it into a drama about racism, casting young African American actor James Edwards as the soldier who must battle discrimination in...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Susan King
Pier Paolo Pasolini was one of Italian cinema's most influential, controversial and iconoclastic filmmakers, arriving on the scene after neo-realists such as Vittorio De Sica and Roberto Rossellini. The openly gay playwright, novelist, political theorist, journalist, teacher and poet made films in order to "represent reality with reality. " UCLA Film & Television Archive's new retrospective, "Pure and Impure: The Films of Pier Paolo Pasolini," which opens Friday at the Billy Wilder Theater, features new prints from Istituto Luce Cinecitta in Rome.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Several classic feature films such as 1961's "Breakfast at Tiffany's," 1950's "Born Yesterday" and 1983's "A Christmas Story" were among the 25 motion pictures selected last December for inclusion in the prestigious National Film Registry of the Library of Congress because they represent important achievements in filmmaking. But not every film was a familiar title. Also making the list was "Parable," a 20-minute religious allegorical silent short with music. "Parable" was the main attraction of the Protestant and Orthodox Center at the 1964 New York World's Fair.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
"Hungry Hobos," a 1928 Walt Disney animated short film that was considered lost for decades, will screen Saturday at UCLA as part of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra's 24th annual Silent Film Event. The short, which predates Mickey Mouse and stars the character Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, is one of the earliest Disney cartoons. Staff at the Huntley Film Archives, a stock footage company in England, found a 16-mm print of the movie in a vault there in 2011, surprising many in the animation community who assumed it had been destroyed like so many silent-era films.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Susan King
An early film by Robert Atman, a sneak preview of Al Pacino as Phil Spector and a Bob Hope and Bing Crosby "Road" picture double bill are among the highlights this weekend. The UCLA Film & Television Archive's Festival of Preservation offers a rare screening of Altman's 1969 drama "That Cold Day in the Park" Saturday evening at the Billy Wilder Theater. Sandy Dennis and Michael Burns star in this film, which was dismissed by both critics and audiences when released. The follow year, Altman hit big with "MASH.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Genre filmmaking helps make sense of the world, creating codes by which the seemingly irrational ways of human behavior can be understood. With storytelling modes that travel from country to country - the crime picture, the horror film, the action movie - genres cross borders and barriers with audiences the world over. On-screen violence can be seen as an international language. When people decry or defend the graphic depiction of violence on screen, it is usually in reference to mainstream American movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2004
Due to film transport problems, the UCLA Film and Television Archive has rescheduled Sunday's screening of "Tehran, 7:00 A.M." to Sunday, Feb. 22 at 7 p.m. The film is part of the archive's 14th Annual Celebration of Iranian Cinema. Information: (310) 206-FILM or www.cinema.ucla.edu.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Susan King
Oscar-nominated director David Fincher ("The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," "The Social Network") will have an extended conversation at Film Independent at LACMA's "An Evening with David Fincher" Thursday at the Loe S. Bing Theater. The program is to feature the first two episodes of Netflix's new series "House of Cards," starring Kevin Spacey as a manipulative House majority whip. Fincher is the executive producer of the 13-part series and directed the first two installments.
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