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May 5, 2013 | By Karen Wada
The story of the Beat Generation is often seen as a tale of two cities: The movement began in New York and blossomed in San Francisco. A UCLA Library exhibit sheds light on "a third, lesser-known hub" - Los Angeles, specifically the beachside bohemia of Venice. "The Beats were an influential part of our literary environment," says Susan D. Anderson, a library special collections curator who specializes in modern L.A. history. "We want to highlight their presence as well as the rich diversity of other nonmainstream writing [that was]
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
The body of a man found on UCLA's campus was the result of a suicide, according to the Los Angeles County coroner Thursday. The body was identified as Reynaldo Quitos, 47, an assistant in the school's Southern Regional Library Facility, coroner officials said. The body was found Tuesday afternoon across campus, outside of Boelter Hall. It appears the man either fell or jumped from the building, which has many engineering classrooms. The cause of death was “multiple traumatic injuries,” authorities said, and coroner officials have closed the case as a suicide.  ALSO: Edison employees shot 'Star Trek' spoof video at San Onofre L.A. mayor: Villaraigosa, Garcetti promise 'seamless transition' Twitter : @RosannaXia
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REAL ESTATE
June 6, 1993
Architect Ming Fung, who designed the UCLA Towell Library, will speak Tuesday at a 6 p.m. dinner meeting of the Assn. of Women in Architecture at the Shangri-La Restaurant, 313 S. Boylston St., in downtown Los Angeles. Scholarship winners also will be announced at the dinner. More details may be obtained by phoning (310) 827-8332.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2013 | By Karen Wada
The story of the Beat Generation is often seen as a tale of two cities: The movement began in New York and blossomed in San Francisco. A UCLA Library exhibit sheds light on "a third, lesser-known hub" - Los Angeles, specifically the beachside bohemia of Venice. "The Beats were an influential part of our literary environment," says Susan D. Anderson, a library special collections curator who specializes in modern L.A. history. "We want to highlight their presence as well as the rich diversity of other nonmainstream writing [that was]
NEWS
May 23, 1994
Robert Gordon Vosper, the venerated UCLA librarian who is credited with directing the growth and direction of the university's volumes into what is acknowledged today as a world-class collection, has died. A spokesman for the Westwood university said Vosper died at his Los Angeles home May 14. He was 80 and directed the school library from 1961 until his retirement in 1973. UCLA Chancellor Charles E.
NEWS
September 10, 1987
UCLA's Map Library, the largest of its kind in the nation, has been renamed in honor of Henry J. Bruman, professor emeritus, who retired from the faculty in 1982. In 1980, Bruman established an educational foundation that has provided more than $100,000 for the UCLA Library. The Westwood resident joined the faculty in 1945, served as chairman of the geography department from 1957 to 1961 and has received numerous academic awards including West Germany's 1971 Gold Humboldt Medal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Clark Powell, the legendary librarian and literary bibliographer who founded the UCLA School of Library Service and built the fledgling UCLA library into an institution worthy of his name, has died. He was 94. Powell died Wednesday in La Rosa Health Center in Tucson, university officials announced Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1994 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All Zepur Jakmakian wanted was a quick trip to the library to get started researching a paper for her biology class at Cal State Northridge. Last year, that would have meant a 10-minute walk across campus. This week, it turned into a 3 1/2-hour ordeal. Because the Jan. 17 earthquake closed CSUN's sole library and it may take a year to reopen, campus officials have had to arrange alternate service at UCLA.
NEWS
May 16, 1985
Cliff May, a leading exponent of the California ranch-house style, is the subject of a new oral history volume in the UCLA library. A resident of Brentwood, he is a designer, contractor and real estate developer. UCLA's Oral History Program was established in 1959 to document regional history and includes more than 300 interviews. Bound volumes containing the interviews may be read in the special collections section of the University Research Library.
NEWS
June 5, 1986
Two groups of reference librarians formerly housed at the fire-damaged Los Angeles Central Library have found new quarters at the UCLA Library, university librarian Russell Shank announced. Nine staff members of the Southern California Answering Network are working in offices in the university's research library and six staff members of the Metropolitan Cooperative Library System are being housed at the Powell library.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2009 | Susan King
The literary papers of the late Los Angeles novelist John Fante have been acquired by the UCLA Library, it was announced Tuesday. The collection features his book manuscripts, short stories and screenplays, as well as personal letters, business records and memorabilia such as his typewriter, pencil and a lock of his hair. "We are delighted to announce this noteworthy acquisition in conjunction with the centennial of Fante's birth on April 8," said UCLA University Librarian Gary E. Strong in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2009 | Larry Gordon
The UCLA library has received a $5-million donation from the London-based Arcadia Fund in what officials said Tuesday was the single largest gift for library collections on the Westwood campus. In expressing his thanks for the gift, which will be paid over five years, university librarian Gary E. Strong said the funds may be used to purchase new materials or to expand digitization efforts, among other things. The Arcadia Fund specializes in helping with the preservation of cultural knowledge, such as rare archives and artifacts, and the protection of threatened natural environments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2006 | Chris Pasles
The UCLA Library has acquired the largest private collection ever assembled of materials on the life and career of modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan. Compiled over more than 30 years by Southland lawyer Howard Holtzman, who died in 1990, the roughly 1,500 items include unpublished letters, manuscripts, photographs, sculptures, dance programs and contracts, and other materials. UCLA paid "slightly less" than the $1.
SPORTS
November 17, 2001 | Valerie Gutierrez
The outlandish behavior of fans helps make college football so entertaining, and during rivalry week that wacky behavior intensifies with inventive pranks against the archrival leading up to the big game. For example, three years ago a group of California students uprooted the Stanford tree costume and took it hostage. A photo of the captive tree wearing a blindfold was sent to the Cal student paper. However, this tradition is fading, at least when it comes to the Southern California rivalry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Clark Powell, the legendary librarian and literary bibliographer who founded the UCLA School of Library Service and built the fledgling UCLA library into an institution worthy of his name, has died. He was 94. Powell died Wednesday in La Rosa Health Center in Tucson, university officials announced Monday.
NEWS
February 9, 2000
James G. Davis, 64, veteran librarian for UCLA's Powell Library and an expert on rare books. Educated at Willamette University and the University of Washington, Davis worked briefly in publishing in New York City. But he spent virtually his entire career--38 years--at UCLA after he was hired in 1959 by library Director Lawrence Clark Powell. In 1983, Davis became rare books librarian in the university's Department of Special Collections, a position he held until his retirement in 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2006 | Chris Pasles
The UCLA Library has acquired the largest private collection ever assembled of materials on the life and career of modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan. Compiled over more than 30 years by Southland lawyer Howard Holtzman, who died in 1990, the roughly 1,500 items include unpublished letters, manuscripts, photographs, sculptures, dance programs and contracts, and other materials. UCLA paid "slightly less" than the $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2009 | Susan King
The literary papers of the late Los Angeles novelist John Fante have been acquired by the UCLA Library, it was announced Tuesday. The collection features his book manuscripts, short stories and screenplays, as well as personal letters, business records and memorabilia such as his typewriter, pencil and a lock of his hair. "We are delighted to announce this noteworthy acquisition in conjunction with the centennial of Fante's birth on April 8," said UCLA University Librarian Gary E. Strong in a statement.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1999 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government on Wednesday charged three Southern California men, including two recent UCLA graduates, with stock fraud, saying they used the Internet to manipulate the price of a tiny stock and generate a fast $364,000 profit. The case, an allegedly elaborate stock fraud using Internet bulletin boards--and many aliases--to pump up investor interest in thinly traded shares, reflects a surprisingly rapid response by regulators: The alleged fraud occurred just one month ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1996
Charles Oakley vividly recalls how his heart sank when he surveyed UCLA's Lawrence Clark Powell Library one dim winter evening after the Northridge earthquake. Workers' lamps in the attic shone through fissures in the ornate plaster ceiling, casting a web of light against the dark beams. "It lit up like a city at night with street lights," said Oakley, the campus architect. "It was then that I realized how much damage there was. I was, quite frankly, devastated."
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