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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
After struggling for months with wobbly finances and internal dissension, the director of UCLA Medical Center announced Tuesday that he will leave his job to take a top post at the University of Kentucky's medical center. Dr. Michael Karpf, 58, has been with UCLA since 1995 and oversaw the school's three hospitals and 18 primary-care clinics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Visitors and patients at UCLA hospitals probably won't notice what's gone missing from the chili, hamburgers and chicken dishes they order for lunch. But by putting antibiotic-free ground beef, ground beef patties and chicken breasts on the menus at the university's Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, hospital officials hope to strike a blow against so-called superbugs. Feeding antibiotics to cows, chicken and pigs is a common practice that enhances growth in the animals but also contributes to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance: when microbes evolve to become impervious to attack, making it more and more difficult for physicians to treat infections.
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BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
A national report card on patient safety gave a failing grade to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, one of the country's most prestigious hospitals and one of only 25 nationwide to receive such low marks. In a report issued Wednesday, the Leapfrog Group, an employer-backed nonprofit group focused on healthcare quality, gave a letter grade of F to UCLA Medical Center for performing poorly on several measures tied to preventing medical errors, patient infections and deaths. Leapfrog withheld a failing grade for UCLA in June when it released its first-ever hospital safety scores to give low-performing hospitals time to show improvement.
OPINION
July 4, 2013
Re "Tough to beat care in health system," Column, July 2 David Lazarus' wife spent eight nights in the intensive care unit of the UCLA Medical Center. Last year, my wife went into a coma at home. I was able to quickly and safely transport her the two miles to the local emergency room, where an MRI scan revealed a problem that required a neurological ICU unit. UCLA refused the transfer, but Cedars-Sinai accepted her. Four days in the ICU and a fifth elsewhere in the wards resulted in a hospital charge of $162,000, which was reimbursed by Medicare for $120,000.
NEWS
October 30, 2003 | Paul Brownfield
Siegfried and Roy illusionist Roy Horn has been transferred from Las Vegas' University Medical Center trauma unit to the UCLA Medical Center. "This is the next step in the recovery process," said the magicians' spokesman, David Kirvin. Kirvin declined to comment specifically on Horn's condition. The illusionist was mauled onstage by a tiger during an Oct. 3 performance at the Mirage Hotel and Casino, where the duo has been performing since 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1991
A former UCLA Medical Center employee was convicted of murder Friday in the slaying of a co-worker and the wounding of his supervisor in the hospital's patient escort center last February. A Superior Court jury deliberated just over two days before convicting Brian Keith Major, 19, of the first-degree murder of Diondra Ann Pichou, 22, of Gardena and the attempted murder of Nora S. Arellano, 30, of Los Angeles. The two women were shot shortly before 6 a.m. Feb.
SPORTS
July 28, 1998 | LISA DILLMAN and LARRY STEWART
Tennis Hall of Famer Rod Laver, 59, suffered a stroke Monday shortly after taping a television interview in Los Angeles and was taken to UCLA Medical Center. A nursing supervisor said late Monday night that Laver had undergone diagnostic procedures, that his family was with him and he was resting comfortably. The supervisor said the family requested that no other information be released.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
West Los Angeles families are being asked to provide free temporary lodging to UCLA Medical Center patients and relatives as part of a special program designed to help out-of-town patients avoid the high cost of housing. UCLA's Host Home Program, sponsored by the medical center's Clinical Social Work and Pastoral Care departments and University Religious Conference, is trying to identify about 50 families a year willing to open their doors to patients and families for brief stays. The Rev.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1993
A caravan of more than 80 bikers left here Sunday with toys in tow to help bring some holiday cheer to sick children undergoing treatment at UCLA Medical Center. The event was sponsored by the Fullerton chapter of the Harley Owners Group--or HOG. It began at 9:30 a.m. as the bikers hit the Riverside Freeway from Magnolia Avenue, heading east for the 45-minute ride to the medical center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1994 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The FBI and internal auditors at UCLA are investigating allegations that an employee in the department of radiological sciences embezzled funds by using outside companies to bill the UCLA Medical Center for services that were never performed, sources told The Times on Monday. UCLA issued a statement to The Times acknowledging an ongoing probe into "possible financial irregularities" but gave no details.
SPORTS
June 25, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
DETROIT - Angels pitcher Jason Vargas will undergo surgery this week to remove a blood clot from his left armpit area, a procedure that is expected to sideline the left-hander for three weeks to a month. Vargas was examined Monday by Dr. Peter Lawrence of the UCLA Medical Center. Lawrence confirmed the initial diagnosis and recommended surgery, which will be performed by Dr. Russell Montgomery. Vargas, who was placed on the 15-day disabled list Friday with a 6-4 record and 3.65 earned run average in 14 starts, will not be able to throw for at least two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | By Anna Gorman and Maria L. La Ganga
As the afternoon wore on, the number of union members on the picket lines at the University of California medical centers started to thin. But hundreds of workers concerned about staffing levels and pension reforms planned to continue striking throughout the evening. Union spokesman Todd Stenhouse said that the decision to strike was a difficult one for many. "These folks would not have gone out if they didn't believe their patients were at risk," he said. One of the strikers, Johnnie Macon, said he has worked at UCLA for 19 years.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2013 | David Lazarus
Ted Kamp wanted to make sure his daughter received the medical treatment she needed. That was his first priority. His second was making sure his insurance would cover things and that he'd pay a fair price for any procedures. The fact that this proved so difficult highlights one of the crazier aspects of the U.S. healthcare system: the inability of patients to know how much their treatment really costs. "It's infuriating and it's exhausting," Kamp, 50, told me. "It's clear that the entire system is designed to bully you into submission.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
A national report card on patient safety gave a failing grade to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, one of the country's most prestigious hospitals and one of only 25 nationwide to receive such low marks. In a report issued Wednesday, the Leapfrog Group, an employer-backed nonprofit group focused on healthcare quality, gave a letter grade of F to UCLA Medical Center for performing poorly on several measures tied to preventing medical errors, patient infections and deaths. Leapfrog withheld a failing grade for UCLA in June when it released its first-ever hospital safety scores to give low-performing hospitals time to show improvement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
The psychiatric emergency services at two county-run hospitals are so overcrowded that mentally ill patients have to sleep on mattresses on the floor, health officials acknowledged this week. The packed conditions at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center and Harbor-UCLA Medical Center make it more difficult to de-escalate the emotions of patients who arrive at the hospital agitated and anxious, said Christina Ghaly, deputy director of strategic planning for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
A contract dispute between one of California's largest health insurers and UCLA could force thousands of patients at the university's medical centers to seek treatment elsewhere if the disagreement is not resolved by the end of December. Executives from Blue Shield of California and the University of California's health system are quarreling over reimbursement rates for medical treatment at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Westwood and nearby Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz and Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writers
UCLA Medical Center's new hospital admitted its first patients Sunday after successfully moving patients across the street from its old facility in a delicate, tightly scheduled operation. The transfer occurred even as new mothers delivered their babies and doctors performed organ transplants. The 335 patients were moved at the rate of one every two minutes. The move capped years of planning that began after the 1994 Northridge earthquake badly damaged the old site.
SPORTS
July 15, 1991 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Keri Phebus knew she should not have been out of bed Saturday morning, let alone spending 2 hours and 45 minutes chasing tennis balls. So Phebus, a senior at Corona del Mar High School this fall, was one of the few people who wasn't surprised when she was upset in the first round of the U.S. Olympic Festival women's singles competition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Harbor-UCLA Medical Center has failed to keep its operating rooms clean and safe and to protect its patients from possible infection, according to federal inspection reports recently released to The Times. Inspectors found rooms that had holes in the ceilings or that were dusty and cluttered. Operating rooms were kept at the wrong humidity level, which can lead to the spread of germs, the reports said. Hospital staff members also weren't washing their hands according to policy. "The hospital failed to maintain a sanitary environment for the provision of surgical services," the reports said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2011 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
The chief medical officer at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center may not have followed proper procedures for credentialing doctors at the hospital and is being investigated by the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, according to sources familiar with the inquiry. Gail V. Anderson Jr., who is also an associate dean at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, was placed on paid administrative leave from the county hospital earlier this week and was escorted out of his office. His locks were changed and his computer secured, sources said.
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