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Uday Hussein

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July 24, 2003 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Uday Hussein, who headed Iraq's Olympic Committee, was so feared within the country that the glee many Iraqi sports officials felt Wednesday over the prospect of his death was muted by concern that he was somehow still alive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | Special to the Los Angeles Times
Based on an autobiographical novel by Latif Yahia, an army lieutenant who was forced to become a body double for Saddam Hussein's notoriously decadent son Uday, "The Devil's Double" strives to be an absorbing and suspenseful adventure. Despite numerous pluses — Lee Tamahori's vigorous direction, handsome cinematography, outstanding production design, an impressive dual performance by Dominic Cooper as Uday and Latif — the film is more wearying than entertaining. That's because as a character, Uday is not intriguing, and Michael Thomas' script places the emphasis on him when Latif has by far the more interesting story, much of it not covered in the film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | Special to the Los Angeles Times
Based on an autobiographical novel by Latif Yahia, an army lieutenant who was forced to become a body double for Saddam Hussein's notoriously decadent son Uday, "The Devil's Double" strives to be an absorbing and suspenseful adventure. Despite numerous pluses — Lee Tamahori's vigorous direction, handsome cinematography, outstanding production design, an impressive dual performance by Dominic Cooper as Uday and Latif — the film is more wearying than entertaining. That's because as a character, Uday is not intriguing, and Michael Thomas' script places the emphasis on him when Latif has by far the more interesting story, much of it not covered in the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In "The Devil's Double," which opens in Los Angeles on Friday, actor Dominic Cooper does double duty. Not only does he play Uday Hussein, the notorious sadistic playboy son of Saddam Hussein, he also plays Latif Yahia — a man whose resemblance to Uday earned him the unwelcome job of his body double. Audiences have long loved a twin-type story — and given the economics of modern Hollywood, getting two performances out of one star must seem like a good deal. Although making it appear as if the same person is doubled on-screen is one of the oldest camera tricks around, digital technology has given filmmakers more options than ever to work their sleight-of-hand.
WORLD
July 23, 2003 | Mark Fineman and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
Both were rich and famous, the sons of a president-for-life. Both loved their father, blindly loyal to him throughout their lives. Both were murderers, leaving behind a body count that some analysts say ran into the thousands. And both died at the same place and time, at the hands of 200 American soldiers in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul on Tuesday. But that's where the similarities began and ended for brothers Qusai and Uday Hussein. "Qusai was not a serial rapist, and Uday, of course, was.
NEWS
March 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's elder son, Uday, won an overwhelming victory in parliamentary elections. The younger Hussein won "the highest number of votes among all candidates," Justice Minister Shabib Maliki said. The state-run weekly newspaper Al Ittihad said Uday Hussein was named on 99.99% of ballots cast Monday. His entry into parliament will also give him a chance at the powerful post of speaker.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Saddam Hussein's son Uday appeared on Iraqi television for the first time since surviving an assassination attempt last week and said he was recovering from his wounds. "I'm fine," Uday Hussein told the television station that he owns. "I'm recovering." He implied that neighboring Iran was behind the assassination attempt. The TV footage showed Uday Hussein in what appeared to be a hospital room, draped with a sheet from his upper chest to his feet.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The eldest son of President Saddam Hussein has called for greater progress toward multiparty democracy in Iraq. Uday Hussein, who was elected to parliament in March, also attacked the poor performance of government ministries in a paper he submitted to the assembly when he made his first appearance there Dec. 24.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uday Hussein, the son of and heir apparent to Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, was shot in the head Thursday during an ambush in Baghdad, according to Iraqi media reports and U.S. intelligence. Details were sketchy late Thursday. Iraqi television described Uday's condition as "stable" and "not a matter of concern." "He was the target of a cowardly attack which led to a light wound," reported Youth TV, which is run by Uday, 32, and serves as one of several instruments of power. But U.S.
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Iraqi sources gave conflicting reports Friday about the condition of President Saddam Hussein's eldest son, one day after assailants attacked him as he drove through a Baghdad suburb. Iraqi opposition sources in Amman, Jordan, said heavy machine guns and grenades were used in Thursday's attack on Uday Hussein, 32, and that as many as 120 people, most of them passersby, were arrested at the scene.
WORLD
August 3, 2003 | From Associated Press
Saddam Hussein's two older sons and a grandson were buried as martyrs Saturday in rocky soil near the deposed leader's hometown, where insurgents afterward attacked U.S. troops with three remote-controlled bombs. At least two American soldiers were injured in the explosions in Tikrit after elders of Hussein's tribe buried the ousted dictator's sons, Uday and Qusai, along with Qusai's 14-year-old son, in an outlying village.
WORLD
August 2, 2003 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Weeds grow in the cracks of the concrete pavement now and the summer wind off the Tigris stirs the empty liquor cartons in the trashed Boat Club, Uday Hussein's favorite party spot. The former bodyguard picks his way through the shattered glass, twisted metal, torn magazines and bottle tops to show a reporter where he and other members of Uday's security detail used to sit in a small building just across from the club.
WORLD
July 25, 2003 | Alissa J. Rubin and John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writers
The U.S. military took the unusual step Thursday of releasing graphic photographs of the blood-spattered bodies of Saddam Hussein's sons as proof to the Iraqi people that the two feared members of the past regime are dead. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told reporters in Washington that the release of the images was justified "because these two are particularly bad characters."
SPORTS
July 24, 2003 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Uday Hussein, who headed Iraq's Olympic Committee, was so feared within the country that the glee many Iraqi sports officials felt Wednesday over the prospect of his death was muted by concern that he was somehow still alive.
WORLD
July 24, 2003 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
The shopkeeper leaned over the counter, almost chortling with excitement Wednesday as he talked about the killings of Saddam Hussein's two sons by American soldiers. Then he paused, a look of doubt passing over his face. "I would like to make sure 100% that they are dead," said Majid Rasheed, 40, the owner of a small shoe store in Baghdad's affluent Mansour neighborhood.
WORLD
July 23, 2003 | Robin Wright, Times Staff Writer
The deaths of Saddam Hussein's powerful sons Tuesday is a badly needed boost for the Bush administration, a major strategic gain for U.S. forces battling Iraqi resistance and a boon for the fragile new governing council in Iraq. The raid in the northern city of Mosul, perhaps the most dramatic event in Iraq since the toppling of Hussein's statue in downtown Baghdad more than three months ago, signals a psychological turning point, according to U.S.
NEWS
December 29, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 600 officials have been arrested following an assassination attempt on the eldest son of President Saddam Hussein, according to former Iraqi intelligence chief. "The arrests were made within what is called in Iraq an emergency plan, which stipulates the detention of all suspected figures within the army, government and party," said former intelligence chief Wafiq Samaraei, who defected to Syria in 1994. Authorities said Uday Hussein, 32, was shot in an ambush Dec.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's son had been operated on four times in two days and was in serious condition owing to the attempt on his life in Baghdad, according to an Iraqi opposition group based in Jordan. Uday Hussein, 32, was wounded in the neck when gunmen ambushed his armored car Thursday, said the opposition Iraqi National Accord. Iraq's official media remained silent on Uday's condition and details of the attack, and reports from the opposition could not be independently confirmed.
WORLD
July 23, 2003 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
Acting on a tip from an Iraqi informant, U.S. forces backed by rocket-firing helicopters stormed a luxury home on the outskirts of this northern city on Tuesday. After a six-hour operation they removed the bodies of two of the most hated and feared men in Iraq: Saddam Hussein's sons Uday and Qusai. Two other Iraqis were killed in the assault. Residents of the neighborhood said they were a bodyguard and a teenager, believed to be Qusai's son. U.S.
WORLD
July 23, 2003 | Mark Fineman and Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writers
Both were rich and famous, the sons of a president-for-life. Both loved their father, blindly loyal to him throughout their lives. Both were murderers, leaving behind a body count that some analysts say ran into the thousands. And both died at the same place and time, at the hands of 200 American soldiers in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul on Tuesday. But that's where the similarities began and ended for brothers Qusai and Uday Hussein. "Qusai was not a serial rapist, and Uday, of course, was.
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