Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUffizi Palace
IN THE NEWS

Uffizi Palace

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 28, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A terrorist bomb that killed five people outside Florence's Uffizi Palace early Thursday destroyed several minor 17th-Century works of Italian art and damaged some works by renowned artists but left the museum's most famous paintings and sculptures unharmed. Italy's interior minister promptly called the bombing the work of "Mafia terrorism" at a time when Italian authorities are waging their most successful campaign ever against organized crime.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1993
Re "Hollywood Fails to Understand Latino Culture" by Raymund A. Paredes (June 21): While I agree that Hollywood has really failed to understand our goals, dreams and sorrows, a lot of responsibility must be borne by those within our own community who are not interested in investing in our own projects. Take a look, for example, at the Spanish TV network in the United States and you will find very few programs that will merit our time and attention. Paredes suggests, for example, the making of exciting films based on the lives of Jose Marti, the Cuban poet and patriot, and Oscar Zeta Acosta, the lawyer and activist.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1993
Re "Hollywood Fails to Understand Latino Culture" by Raymund A. Paredes (June 21): While I agree that Hollywood has really failed to understand our goals, dreams and sorrows, a lot of responsibility must be borne by those within our own community who are not interested in investing in our own projects. Take a look, for example, at the Spanish TV network in the United States and you will find very few programs that will merit our time and attention. Paredes suggests, for example, the making of exciting films based on the lives of Jose Marti, the Cuban poet and patriot, and Oscar Zeta Acosta, the lawyer and activist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1993 | JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Uffizi Gallery in Florence, home to one of the world's favorite art collections, returned to life Sunday and opened its doors free of charge in celebration of a remarkable recovery. Tens of thousands of art lovers--some from the United States and Japan--waited for hours under the broiling sun Sunday morning to visit the museum, which was seriously damaged by a bomb explosion 24 days ago that killed five people.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1993 | JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Uffizi Gallery in Florence, home to one of the world's favorite art collections, returned to life Sunday and opened its doors free of charge in celebration of a remarkable recovery. Tens of thousands of art lovers--some from the United States and Japan--waited for hours under the broiling sun Sunday morning to visit the museum, which was seriously damaged by a bomb explosion 24 days ago that killed five people.
TRAVEL
June 13, 1993 | KIM UPTON
Florence's cherished Uffizi Palace, which was badly damaged by a car bomb two weeks ago, will reopen two days later than first reported, next Sunday rather than Friday, according to Francesco Sisinni, director general of Italy's culture ministry. The 400-year-old museum, home to one of the world's greatest collections of Renaissance art, was damaged by a May 27 bomb that killed five people.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
The terrorist bombing of the Uffizi Palace in Florence, Italy, first engenders panic in the heart and mind. Then, slowly, the blood turns to ice. The panic comes from a sudden jamming of the mental circuits. Which beloved works of art in this most extraordinary museum might have been damaged or destroyed? Among the countless masterpieces of the Uffizi, which would you grab first, in any unthinkable emergency, to rush to safety? The task of choosing is impossible.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
No Joy in Whoopi-ville: Whoopi Goldberg will no longer whoop it up with celebrities on her late-night talk show. The show has stopped production and will not return for a second season due to poor ratings, Genesis Entertainment, an independent TV distribution company, announced. The syndicated show, which aired locally on KCAL Channel 9 at midnight, featured Goldberg one-on-one with her guest of the evening in an informal living-room setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1993 | J.L. JONSSON, Jonsson teaches English at El Camino College in Torrance. and
A single death is a tragedy; a million deaths is a statistic. --Josef Stalin Once upon a time not so very long ago, when Stalin is reported to have made his famous remark, it still took thousands of deaths to turn personal tragedy into mere statistics. Today, life is much cheaper.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uffizi Gallery officials began picking up the pieces Friday as thousands of Italians took to the streets of Florence to protest Thursday's car-bomb attack on the famed museum. A tour of the gallery, on the top floor of the 16th-Century Uffizi Palace, revealed extensive damage both to the structure of the building and to about three dozen paintings and sculptures. "The damage is serious but nothing like what it could have been," said Anna Maria Petrioli Tofani, the gallery's director.
TRAVEL
June 13, 1993 | KIM UPTON
Florence's cherished Uffizi Palace, which was badly damaged by a car bomb two weeks ago, will reopen two days later than first reported, next Sunday rather than Friday, according to Francesco Sisinni, director general of Italy's culture ministry. The 400-year-old museum, home to one of the world's greatest collections of Renaissance art, was damaged by a May 27 bomb that killed five people.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
The terrorist bombing of the Uffizi Palace in Florence, Italy, first engenders panic in the heart and mind. Then, slowly, the blood turns to ice. The panic comes from a sudden jamming of the mental circuits. Which beloved works of art in this most extraordinary museum might have been damaged or destroyed? Among the countless masterpieces of the Uffizi, which would you grab first, in any unthinkable emergency, to rush to safety? The task of choosing is impossible.
NEWS
May 28, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A terrorist bomb that killed five people outside Florence's Uffizi Palace early Thursday destroyed several minor 17th-Century works of Italian art and damaged some works by renowned artists but left the museum's most famous paintings and sculptures unharmed. Italy's interior minister promptly called the bombing the work of "Mafia terrorism" at a time when Italian authorities are waging their most successful campaign ever against organized crime.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
The May 27 bombing of the Uffizi Gallery set off a barrage of questions about artworks in Florence's magnificent treasure trove. Which works were lost? Which were damaged, and how badly? Answers came quickly--3 paintings destroyed, 30 paintings and 3 sculptures damaged--but the news only inspired new questions. What kinds of injuries were sustained by the artworks? Who will heal them? What methods will be used?
TRAVEL
November 18, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
As part of its celebrations of the 125th anniversary of the first ascent of the Matterhorn this past summer, the Swiss town of Zermatt erected a statue of St. Bernard, the patron of mountain guides, just below the mountain's 14,688-foot summit. Detracting somewhat from Bernard's looks, unfortunately, is the inclusion of a lightning rod poking out of the saint's head--a reminder of the sudden electrical storms that can break out on the peak.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|