Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUfw
IN THE NEWS

Ufw

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
February 3, 2006
I was surprised that in the recent series on the United Farm Workers (Jan. 8-11), The Times did not interview any of the many legislators with whom the UFW has worked over the years. As a result of the UFW's work and the legislative battles it has fought, California's farmworkers have won pesticide protections, farm labor contractor reforms, elimination of backbreaking hand weeding, binding mediation of labor disputes and improved healthcare. Last year, the UFW won for California's workers the right to paid breaks, shade and cool drinking water to recover from the effects of working in the heat.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | Diana Marcum
The audience members stepped off buses waving red UFW flags. Some came straight from the fields. Those from Salinas and Madera and farther away had given up a day's wages to attend. The first feature film about Cesar Chavez had been screened in Los Angeles and at the White House. On Tuesday evening, "Cesar Chavez" played outdoors and in Spanish for the farmworkers Chavez represented. "From the beginning, we said we have to go back and give it to the people," director Diego Luna said.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 29, 1987
Harry Bernstein appropriately noted the ludicrousness of the recent $1.7-million judgment imposed against the United Farm Workers union. However, he understated the UFW's ability to overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles. In its 25-year history, the UFW has tenaciously overcome every threat to its existence. Through its current grape boycott, the UFW will survive this crisis and continue to serve farm workers and consumers. The UFW does face many obstacles. The Deukmejian Administration refuses to enforce a law that protects the right of farm workers to organize.
OPINION
September 25, 2012 | By Matt Garcia
Cesar Chavez died in 1993, but the Mexican American labor leader's prominence continues to grow. Streets in many American cities bear his name; his face appeared on a postage stamp; President Obama embraced Chavez's slogan, " Sí, se puede " ("Yes, it can be done") in his 2008 campaign; and Apple featured the United Farm Workers founder in its "think different" campaign. These honors have all served to heighten public awareness of Chavez, who for a time seemed to be winning the battle to bring justice to the farm fields of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1993
An art auction to raise money for the United Farm Workers will be held at 1:30 p.m. Sunday on the lawn near the Performing Arts Center at Cal State Fullerton, a UFW official said. "We have a Remington bronze sculpture, which was donated to us, and several other valuable artworks," said the official, Russ Jobin. Jobin said that there are more than 65 pieces to be auctioned. There is no charge for admission, and parking is available on campus for $1.50. For more information, call (714) 773-3731.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1986 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
A Ventura County ranch Thursday asked the National Labor Relations Board to seek a federal court order curbing a United Farm Workers boycott of its eggs. The request by Egg City follows an opinion, issued this week by NLRB staff in Washington, that ranch attorneys contend significantly bolsters their challenge to the legality of parts of a farm workers' boycott, such as picketing markets that sell Egg City's eggs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1986 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
Vegetable grower Carl Maggio has won the first round in his $1.8-million civil damage suit against the Cesar Chavez-led United Farm Workers union as a result of the violence-marred 1979 Imperial Valley lettuce strikes in which one striker was shot to death.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | Associated Press
United Farm Workers co-founder Dolores Huerta was hospitalized in stable condition today after surgery for a stomach injury she claims came in a police attack on protesters during Vice President George Bush's visit. The attack on Huerta, the union's vice president, was "totally unwarranted," said UFW field representative Howard Wallace. It took place during protests outside the St. Francis Hotel where Bush spoke Wednesday. Earlier in the day, Bush had said he opposes the UFW's grape boycott.
OPINION
January 15, 1986 | JEROME COHEN, Jerome Cohen was general counsel of the United Farm Workers of America until 1979. He is now in private practice in Carmel Valley, Calif.
One constant in our political life is the shameless manner in which certain politicians cater to the needs of the special interests that nurture them. Agribusiness has contributed almost $1 million to George Deukmejian, and now enjoys immunity from effective enforcement of the Agricultural Labor Relations Act of 1975. Deukmejian's general counsel to the Agricultural Labor Relations Board, David Stirling, has effectively denied farm workers access to the law intended to protect them.
OPINION
September 25, 2012 | By Matt Garcia
Cesar Chavez died in 1993, but the Mexican American labor leader's prominence continues to grow. Streets in many American cities bear his name; his face appeared on a postage stamp; President Obama embraced Chavez's slogan, " Sí, se puede " ("Yes, it can be done") in his 2008 campaign; and Apple featured the United Farm Workers founder in its "think different" campaign. These honors have all served to heighten public awareness of Chavez, who for a time seemed to be winning the battle to bring justice to the farm fields of California.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2012 | By Richard Simon
In another tribute to Cesar E. Chavez and the farm workers movement, the U.S. Labor Department on Monday named the auditorium at its Washington headquarters after the legendary California labor organizer.   It also added pioneers of the farm workers movement to its Hall of Honor , a recognition inside the department's headquarters to Americans who have improved the quality of life for workers.  Chavez, who died in 1993 at the age of 66, was added in 1998 to the group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2011 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
Richard Chavez, who helped his older brother, legendary labor organizer Cesar Chavez, build the United Farm Workers into a force in state politics and agriculture, died Wednesday. He was 81. Chavez died from complications following surgery in a Bakersfield hospital, the UFW announced. "He was one of those little-known giants within the movement. He was extremely effective," Arturo Rodriguez, the union's president, said Wednesday in an interview with The Times. Born on his family's farm near Yuma, Ariz., in November 1929, Chavez was a migrant worker as a child growing up in the Great Depression.
OPINION
June 23, 2011
California's agricultural laborers work hard and lead difficult lives. Wages are low, making it nearly impossible to save enough money to secure better lives for their children. Work is seasonal, leaving long gaps in pay. Affordable housing is scarce. Laborers whose work is badly needed by growers and consumers often come to the U.S. in violation of immigration laws, making them subject to employer exploitation. For years, workers have helped tilt the balance of power in fields and factory farms incrementally by organizing themselves into labor unions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Forty-one years ago, Cesar Chavez and local table grape growers gathered in a squat white building surrounded by vineyards and weeds on the western edge of this Central Valley community to sign contracts that brought large-scale unionization to agriculture for the first time in history. Back then, it was the hub of a United Farm Workers complex known as 40 Acres, and "Huelga! Huelga!" — the Spanish word for "strike" — was the familiar battle cry of fieldworkers and their supporters around the world.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Three decades ago, Dean Florez landed the perfect summer job in this sun-baked, Kern County farm town: filling burlap sacks with 50 pounds of potatoes, then sewing them shut with a steel needle and three loops of twine. It may not sound glamorous, but it was better than his previous job hauling irrigation pipe around rose and vegetable fields for 10 and 12 hours a day in triple-digit heat. Plus, the teenage Florez got to work under a roof, eat lunch in a refrigerated rail car and put in for overtime on long days.
OPINION
April 7, 2010
Chavez's legacy Re "Not just to praise Cesar," Opinion, March 31 Thank you for this nuanced article. Indeed, all heroes are human, with real flaws -- and our history books should take note, because that is how we learn how challenging it is to bring about "change," work with others and be aware of our own flaws. I have not read Miriam Pawel's book, but she might have added in the article that even the first part of Chavez's work as a labor organizer should be told with shades of gray.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2011 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
Richard Chavez, who helped his older brother, legendary labor organizer Cesar Chavez, build the United Farm Workers into a force in state politics and agriculture, died Wednesday. He was 81. Chavez died from complications following surgery in a Bakersfield hospital, the UFW announced. "He was one of those little-known giants within the movement. He was extremely effective," Arturo Rodriguez, the union's president, said Wednesday in an interview with The Times. Born on his family's farm near Yuma, Ariz., in November 1929, Chavez was a migrant worker as a child growing up in the Great Depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | Richard Steven Street, Street is the author, most recently, of "Everyone Had Cameras: Photography and Farmworkers in California, 1850-2000," the third volume in his history of California farmworkers.
The Union of Their Dreams Power, Hope, and Struggle in Cesar Chavez's Farm Worker Movement Miriam Pawel Bloomsbury Press: 372 pp., $28 It's hard to challenge a saint. And so, the story of the United Farm Workers union tends to start and stop with César Chávez, the audacious Mexican American who built the UFW. So great is his accomplishment and so dramatic his story that few writers have ventured beyond hagiography. Accounts glow with a familiar refrain: Chávez patiently waiting for his chance, taking on the Delano table grape growers and emerging as an innovator who injected civil-rights tactics into the farmworker struggle, a modern Gandhi who induced 17 million Americans, and millions more worldwide, to stop eating grapes.
OPINION
September 9, 2009 | Miriam Pawel, Miriam Pawel is the author of the forthcoming book "The Union of Their Dreams: Power, Hope, and Struggle in Cesar Chavez's Farm Worker Movement."
Ayear ago, when state legislators proposed a $9.8-billion water bond, United Farm Workers President Arturo Rodriguez applauded: "We are very excited about that because we want to see a viable agricultural industry throughout the state of California; we want to see farmworkers employed." Last week, Rodriguez created a political committee, bankrolled with $1 million from a national labor coalition, to oppose the very same idea. It's not the interests of farmworkers that have changed; the UFW's about-face appears to have been a clumsy attempt at political blackmail.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|