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WORLD
July 11, 2010 | From Times Wire Services
Bomb blasts ripped through two separate bars packed with soccer fans watching the World Cup final in the Ugandan capital Kampala late Sunday, killing dozens of people, including an American, police said Monday. The deadliest attack occurred at a rugby club as people watched the game between Spain and the Netherlands on a large-screen TV outdoors. The second blast took place at an Ethiopian restaurant, where at least three Americans were wounded. "At this moment we can confirm that one American has been killed," U.S. Embassy public affairs officer Joan Lockard said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
So, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni doesn't like gays. In fact, he thinks they're “disgusting.” Oh, and he doesn't think much of the West either. And he says Uganda would be just fine without Western aid . So why haven't we halted - in a New York minute - the $450 million a year or so in foreign aid we give this clown and his country? On Monday, Museveni signed a harsh anti-gay bill into law that basically declares open season on homosexuals in Uganda. But not content to simply spout nonsense about gays, he also blasted Western “cultural imperialism” and Western aid, which he said was a problem itself for Uganda.
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NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Maeve Reston
Making a quick trip to California after Tuesday night's debate in Nevada, Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann sought to broaden the conversation to national security - chiding President Obama for “leading from behind” and accusing him of overstretching the nation's military resources. Lamenting the fact that Republican candidates have spent very little time debating foreign policy, Bachmann told a group of "tea party" activists in Pasadena on Wednesday that the president was wrong to send armed advisors to Uganda and several surrounding countries to target the militia known as the Lord's Resistance Army, which has killed thousands of people over the last two decades.
WORLD
February 24, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Human rights groups and Western leaders condemned harsh anti-gay legislation signed into law Monday by Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni, calling it draconian, offensive and an affront to basic rights. But Ugandan officials and parliamentarians, including David Bahati, who introduced the law in parliament, celebrated the move. Bahati posted a thank you message to Museveni on his Facebook page: "If you are involved in the gay and lesbianism lifestyle you are liable to life imprisonment.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | Reuters
President Clinton has nominated E. Michael Southwick, a career Foreign Service diplomat, to be the U.S. ambassador to Uganda, the White House announced. Southwick, 49, is deputy chief of mission at the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
A plan by women's rights groups to stage the graphic theater work "The Vagina Monologues" to raise money for war-affected African women failed when the government banned the performance as contrary to Ugandan values. Several groups had planned to present American playwright Eve Ensler's performance over the weekend to help women affected by an 18-year insurgency in northern Uganda, as well as domestic and sexual abuse in this poor central African country.
WORLD
July 15, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Lutfi Sheriff Mohammed, Los Angeles Times
The streets of Mogadishu echo with the footsteps of Shabab fighters, the rattle of their rifles and their recitations of a medieval version of Islamic law that espouses public beheadings and the stoning of adulterers. The militant group has loomed as a dangerous and fanatical curiosity contained from the outside world by war and the cruel designs of a failed state. But Shabab expanded its battlefield by hundreds of miles Sunday when it reached across porous borders and claimed responsibility for twin bombings that killed 76 people in Uganda.
NEWS
February 20, 1986 | United Press International
President Yoweri Museveni has lifted censorship imposed by the previous military regime and encouraged the nation's press to expose government corruption, Ugandan officials said Wednesday. Information Minister Abu Mayanja told a meeting of newspaper editors that Museveni believes a free press can serve as a watchdog against human rights abuses. Museveni's National Resistance Army seized power in Uganda on Jan. 25, ousting Gen.
WORLD
January 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Ugandan rebel leaders who have exploited thousands of kidnapped children as soldiers or sex slaves will be the target of the first investigation by the International Criminal Court in The Hague, the chief prosecutor said. The world's only permanent war crimes tribunal won jurisdiction for its first case when Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni asked it to investigate possible crimes against humanity by the Lord's Resistance Army.
WORLD
July 12, 2010 | From Times Wire Services
— In simultaneous bombings bearing the hallmarks of international terrorists, two explosions ripped through crowds watching the World Cup final in two places in Uganda's capital late Sunday, killing 64 people, police said. One American was slain and several were wounded. The deadliest attack occurred at a rugby club as people watched the game between Spain and the Netherlands on a large-screen TV outdoors. The second blast took place at an Ethiopian restaurant, where at least three Americans were wounded.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. - President Obama squeezed in one last round of golf on Monday before wrapping up his secluded Presidents Day weekend and heading back to Washington. Obama made no public appearances for three full days while hosting his three closest high school buddies at a sun-splashed private estate that has become one of his favorite getaway destinations. The president also spent part of the weekend consulting with National Security Advisor Susan Rice, who was along on the trip to attend the president's Friday night meeting with the king of Jordan concerning the crisis in Syria and Middle East peace negotiations.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. - President Obama warned Sunday that a harsh new anti-gay law in Uganda would “complicate our valued relationship” with the east African country, which receives hundreds of millions of dollars a year in U.S. aid. In a last-ditch effort to derail the measure, national security advisor Susan Rice called Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni over the weekend and urged him not to sign the measure. The law includes a provision of life in prison for “aggravated homosexuality.” But amid news reports that Museveni was intent on pressing forward, Obama said Sunday that the move would be “a step backward for all Ugandans” and would reflect poorly on the country's commitment to protecting the human rights of its people.
OPINION
February 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
A disturbing new law in Nigeria establishes sweeping restrictions on homosexuality and has already led to dozens of arrests. Even before the law went into effect, it was illegal to engage in same-sex relations. But the new law goes further, prohibiting civil unions and same-sex marriages and threatening to slap a 10-year prison sentence on anyone who officiates at such a marriage. The law bans public displays of affection between people of the same sex, outlaws gay support organizations and makes it illegal for gay groups to meet.
OPINION
December 27, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Uganda's deplorable Anti-Homosexuality Bill has reappeared periodically for consideration by its parliament, but until now it has always been withdrawn or placed on the back burner. Last week, however, it failed to disappear; instead, it was approved and awaits the president's signature. That's very bad news. It is already illegal in Uganda for men to engage in sexual relations with other men. But the proposed law strengthens and clarifies the prohibition, setting a 14-year jail term for a first conviction and "imprisonment for life for the offense of aggravated homosexuality," according to a government statement.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Congolese troops backed by a U.N. force on Wednesday drove insurgents from the M23 group from their last stronghold in eastern Congo, raising hopes that the government might defeat the rebels and begin to bring some stability to the troubled region. Bertrand Bisimwa, civilian leader with the M23 rebels, reportedly fled across the border into Uganda, with Congolese officials calling on authorities there to hand him over. The fall of Bunagana, the rebels' headquarters, follows intense fighting in the eastern reaches of the Democratic Republic of Congo after the collapse of peace talks last week over M23's demands that its leaders receive amnesty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
While Uganda's parliament considers an anti-homosexuality bill, which would mandate the death penalty for serial "offenders," Western-supported megachurches flourish in the African country. Roger Ross Williams' incisive and absorbing documentary "God Loves Uganda" makes a compelling case for the link between the two situations without connecting all the dots for viewers, and without condemning the young missionaries who flock to "the pearl of Africa" believing they are saving souls. Williams' alarm is balanced by his measured observation of a group of twentysomethings from the Kansas City-based International House of Prayer.
WORLD
October 7, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The International Criminal Court has issued its first arrest warrants, naming five members of Uganda's notorious Lord's Resistance Army, said William Lacy Swing, the top U.N. envoy to the Democratic Republic of Congo. The LRA has abducted more than 30,000 children, forcing them to become fighters, porters or concubines. The group has killed thousands of civilians and forced more than 1,000,000 from their homes. Officials in The Hague, where the court is based, would not comment.
WORLD
July 30, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Uganda's notorious former dictator Idi Amin remains in a coma, his condition unchanged in recent days, Saudi hospital workers said. Amin, who is believed to be 78, has been on life support since July 18. He was in a coma and suffering from high blood pressure when he was admitted to King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Jidda. He later suffered kidney failure, hospital officials said. Human rights groups say as many as 500,000 people were killed during Amin's rule from 1971 to 1979.
WORLD
October 10, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
M23 rebels in the lawless eastern reaches of the Democratic Republic of Congo have built alliances with local gangs to gain control of lucrative gold mines and smuggle out $500 million a year of the precious metal to finance their brutal attacks, a Washington-based human rights group reported Thursday. Despite M23 leader Bosco Ntaganda's surrender to war crimes investigators in The Hague this year, his co-commander has succeeded in reviving a brisk trade in "conflict minerals," according to the report by Enough, which bills its mission as ending genocide and crimes against humanity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In a time when states are ratifying gay marriage at a record pace and the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy is old news, when the Boy Scouts of America reverse a controversial policy and now accept gay scouts, "Call Me Kuchu," a documentary on Uganda's gay rights debate, hits like a series of shock waves. Filmmakers Katherine Fairfax Wright and Malika Zouhali-Worrall use understatement in laying out the explosive realities of life in Uganda for the LGBT community, the so-called kuchus.
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