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April 4, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
From her majestic hilltop mansion overlooking Lake Victoria, Meena Madhvani has seen enough of the ups and downs of Ugandan life to justify her speaking with a certain tartness. In her time, she has entertained such luminaries as Indira Gandhi. Idi Amin proposed to her and, it is said, infuriated at being rebuffed, expelled tens of thousands of Uganda's Indian citizens. Rebels advancing on Kampala, the capital, camped in her fields of sugar cane.
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NEWS
October 21, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seldom have Africans been asked, and asked themselves, to make so much progress so quickly. Two revolutions, one political and one economic, are under way in East Africa--the result of external pressures from donor nations in the West and internal demands from young Africans for better lives than history has so far given them. If it succeeds, this part of the continent could prove a whole school of African doomsayers wrong.
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NEWS
October 21, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seldom have Africans been asked, and asked themselves, to make so much progress so quickly. Two revolutions, one political and one economic, are under way in East Africa--the result of external pressures from donor nations in the West and internal demands from young Africans for better lives than history has so far given them. If it succeeds, this part of the continent could prove a whole school of African doomsayers wrong.
NEWS
July 11, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They can be intensely small, these skirmishes for Africa's future. Like the duel between the cornerstone and the land mine in the red-dirt frontier of northern Uganda. At an essential moment of their history, Ugandans are building the new pride of Africa--and simultaneously threatening to blow it up. Uganda was a human slaughterhouse during the reign of Idi Amin, the bloodthirsty general who was the nation's self-proclaimed "President for Life" from 1971 to 1979.
NEWS
July 11, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They can be intensely small, these skirmishes for Africa's future. Like the duel between the cornerstone and the land mine in the red-dirt frontier of northern Uganda. At an essential moment of their history, Ugandans are building the new pride of Africa--and simultaneously threatening to blow it up. Uganda was a human slaughterhouse during the reign of Idi Amin, the bloodthirsty general who was the nation's self-proclaimed "President for Life" from 1971 to 1979.
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serious conversations in Africa usually get down to this: Why so much pain here? Well, goes the answer, the gaping wounds of slavery, colonialism and the Cold War are horribly slow to heal. OK, what can be done? The ways of others do not work here, we Africans must find our own way. And what might that be? At this point, the answers become harder.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The motorcade speeds down the center of Uganda's chewed-up highways these days with flashing lights, parting the traffic with an escort of army trucks that sprout soldiers and automatic rifles. "That's His Excellency, Mr. Money," one motorist grumbled as the caravan passed by.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | HENRY WASSWA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Grace Aleng gave birth on the open ground to a girl fathered by one of her rebel abductors. Then she was forced to rejoin the terror campaign being waged by the Lord's Resistance Army in northern Uganda. "I picked up a gun and strapped the baby on my back," the emaciated 18-year-old recalled while nursing her scrawny baby. "But we were defeated by government forces, and I found a way to escape."
WORLD
August 16, 2003 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
Idi Amin, who ravaged Uganda as thoroughly as any leader in modern history ravaged any country, died today in a hospital in Jidda, Saudi Arabia, officials said. He was believed to be 78. Amin, who almost single-handedly turned a nation's prosperity into economic ruin and plunged a peaceful society into a nightmare of chaos and terror, was admitted to King Faisal Specialist Hospital on July 18. He had been in a coma and on life support since his admission.
NEWS
June 27, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serious conversations in Africa usually get down to this: Why so much pain here? Well, goes the answer, the gaping wounds of slavery, colonialism and the Cold War are horribly slow to heal. OK, what can be done? The ways of others do not work here, we Africans must find our own way. And what might that be? At this point, the answers become harder.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
From her majestic hilltop mansion overlooking Lake Victoria, Meena Madhvani has seen enough of the ups and downs of Ugandan life to justify her speaking with a certain tartness. In her time, she has entertained such luminaries as Indira Gandhi. Idi Amin proposed to her and, it is said, infuriated at being rebuffed, expelled tens of thousands of Uganda's Indian citizens. Rebels advancing on Kampala, the capital, camped in her fields of sugar cane.
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