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NEWS
March 31, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joni Kasigaire is charged with keeping an eye on the 648 religious groups registered in this East African country, including the deadly Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God. It is an impossible job, especially when measured against the backdrop of a country short on resources and a populace anxious for a divine escape from everyday difficulties endemic to the world's poorest continent.
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NEWS
March 31, 2000 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joni Kasigaire is charged with keeping an eye on the 648 religious groups registered in this East African country, including the deadly Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God. It is an impossible job, especially when measured against the backdrop of a country short on resources and a populace anxious for a divine escape from everyday difficulties endemic to the world's poorest continent.
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NEWS
October 21, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seldom have Africans been asked, and asked themselves, to make so much progress so quickly. Two revolutions, one political and one economic, are under way in East Africa--the result of external pressures from donor nations in the West and internal demands from young Africans for better lives than history has so far given them. If it succeeds, this part of the continent could prove a whole school of African doomsayers wrong.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The customs still practiced in this lush East African nation are strikingly archaic: Women expected to kneel when serving food to their husbands. Mothers forbidden permanent custody of children after a divorce. Men "inheriting" widows of their deceased brothers. Legal polygamy. Yet Uganda has become a key testing ground for a radical political experiment. All elected bodies, from village councils to the national parliament, must have a minimum number of women. In a word, quotas.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | From Reuters
The Ugandan army has arrested 600 men who could not produce army discharge papers after a roundup of former soldiers, a senior officer said Thursday. Col. Fred Bamwesigye said many former soldiers are suspected of being deserters or bandits. He did not say if charges will be brought against the 600 now in detention.
NEWS
July 11, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They can be intensely small, these skirmishes for Africa's future. Like the duel between the cornerstone and the land mine in the red-dirt frontier of northern Uganda. At an essential moment of their history, Ugandans are building the new pride of Africa--and simultaneously threatening to blow it up. Uganda was a human slaughterhouse during the reign of Idi Amin, the bloodthirsty general who was the nation's self-proclaimed "President for Life" from 1971 to 1979.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The customs still practiced in this lush East African nation are strikingly archaic: Women expected to kneel when serving food to their husbands. Mothers forbidden permanent custody of children after a divorce. Men "inheriting" widows of their deceased brothers. Legal polygamy. Yet Uganda has become a key testing ground for a radical political experiment. All elected bodies, from village councils to the national parliament, must have a minimum number of women. In a word, quotas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1985 | From Reuters
The fourth round of peace talks between Uganda's military government and rebels, due to start Tuesday in neighboring Kenya, have been rescheduled for Oct. 28, President Daniel Arap Moi said Sunday. The titular leader of Uganda's military council, Gen. Tito Okello, reportedly told Moi that the delay is necessary because most Ugandan delegates to the talks are attending the Commonwealth meeting.
NEWS
December 4, 1985
Uganda's military government freed from prison the head of former dictator Idi Amin's murderous secret police after he agreed to leave the country. Bob Astles, 64, who had been in prison six years, said, "I have no regrets for anything." He said he hopes to return to his native Britain. The secret police were responsible for the deaths of thousands of Ugandans in Amin's eight-year reign of terror.
NEWS
October 29, 1985
Uganda's government offered the country's main guerrilla group an equal say on the ruling military council and the vice chairmanship of the body. The offer to Yoweri Museveni's Uganda National Resistance Army was cited by the new military leaders as proof of their commitment to end 4 1/2 years of intermittent civil strife in which thousands of people have been killed or displaced in the East African nation.
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seldom have Africans been asked, and asked themselves, to make so much progress so quickly. Two revolutions, one political and one economic, are under way in East Africa--the result of external pressures from donor nations in the West and internal demands from young Africans for better lives than history has so far given them. If it succeeds, this part of the continent could prove a whole school of African doomsayers wrong.
NEWS
July 11, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They can be intensely small, these skirmishes for Africa's future. Like the duel between the cornerstone and the land mine in the red-dirt frontier of northern Uganda. At an essential moment of their history, Ugandans are building the new pride of Africa--and simultaneously threatening to blow it up. Uganda was a human slaughterhouse during the reign of Idi Amin, the bloodthirsty general who was the nation's self-proclaimed "President for Life" from 1971 to 1979.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | From Reuters
The Ugandan army has arrested 600 men who could not produce army discharge papers after a roundup of former soldiers, a senior officer said Thursday. Col. Fred Bamwesigye said many former soldiers are suspected of being deserters or bandits. He did not say if charges will be brought against the 600 now in detention.
NEWS
August 1, 1985 | Associated Press
The army officers who overthrew Uganda's civilian government said today that ousted President Milton Obote went to the central bank and looted it of an undisclosed sum of foreign currency before fleeing into exile in Kenya. The officers also installed Paulo Muwanga, vice president and defense minister in the Obote government, as prime minister of their interim administration in a ceremony today attended by 11 officials of the ousted government.
WORLD
October 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni traveled to southern Sudan to bolster faltering talks between his government and rebels aimed at ending a brutal 19-year conflict in northern Uganda, a government spokesman said. The two sides signed a truce in August, but alleged violations have led to recriminations and walkouts by mediators, raising fear the deal to end one of Africa's longest wars may unravel.
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