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NEWS
January 20, 1988 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Samson Kisekka of Uganda has returned to Kampala after four weeks in London for treatment of a chest problem, officials said Tuesday. Kisekka, 75, has recovered, but his doctors have advised him to rest for two weeks, they said.
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NEWS
March 12, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The benevolent autocrat who salvaged Uganda from decades of violence and anarchy faces the toughest challenge of his political career today as voters decide whether to reelect him or follow a trend of change sweeping Africa. President Yoweri Museveni, 56, a former freedom fighter who has been in office for 15 years, is up against five other candidates in his bid for a final five-year term.
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NEWS
March 12, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The benevolent autocrat who salvaged Uganda from decades of violence and anarchy faces the toughest challenge of his political career today as voters decide whether to reelect him or follow a trend of change sweeping Africa. President Yoweri Museveni, 56, a former freedom fighter who has been in office for 15 years, is up against five other candidates in his bid for a final five-year term.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The customs still practiced in this lush East African nation are strikingly archaic: Women expected to kneel when serving food to their husbands. Mothers forbidden permanent custody of children after a divorce. Men "inheriting" widows of their deceased brothers. Legal polygamy. Yet Uganda has become a key testing ground for a radical political experiment. All elected bodies, from village councils to the national parliament, must have a minimum number of women. In a word, quotas.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The customs still practiced in this lush East African nation are strikingly archaic: Women expected to kneel when serving food to their husbands. Mothers forbidden permanent custody of children after a divorce. Men "inheriting" widows of their deceased brothers. Legal polygamy. Yet Uganda has become a key testing ground for a radical political experiment. All elected bodies, from village councils to the national parliament, must have a minimum number of women. In a word, quotas.
NEWS
December 27, 1989
With the death of Romania's Ceausescu and the toppling of Panama's Noriega, the dictator seems to be an endangered species at the close of the 1980s. Here are some examples of tyrants in this century: ADOLF HITLER--Germany A frustrated artist and master orator, Hitler blamed Germany's World War I defeat on Jews and Marxists. He was a founder of the Nazi Party and welded it into a strong paramilitary group. The Great Depression brought his party mass support.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sherahi Jaffer had just opened a $1.5-million hotel in downtown Kampala when Idi Amin ordered all Asians to leave the country within 90 days. "Someone from the military had told me I was a fool to build the hotel because they were just going to take it away from me," said Jaffer, 68, the Ugandan-born son of an Indian cotton trader who immigrated around the turn of the century. "But I never thought they would just take our property without compensating us and throw us out." Yet on Aug.
NEWS
December 27, 1989
With the death of Romania's Ceausescu and the toppling of Panama's Noriega, the dictator seems to be an endangered species at the close of the 1980s. Here are some examples of tyrants in this century: ADOLF HITLER--Germany A frustrated artist and master orator, Hitler blamed Germany's World War I defeat on Jews and Marxists. He was a founder of the Nazi Party and welded it into a strong paramilitary group. The Great Depression brought his party mass support.
NEWS
January 20, 1988 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Samson Kisekka of Uganda has returned to Kampala after four weeks in London for treatment of a chest problem, officials said Tuesday. Kisekka, 75, has recovered, but his doctors have advised him to rest for two weeks, they said.
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