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March 12, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The benevolent autocrat who salvaged Uganda from decades of violence and anarchy faces the toughest challenge of his political career today as voters decide whether to reelect him or follow a trend of change sweeping Africa. President Yoweri Museveni, 56, a former freedom fighter who has been in office for 15 years, is up against five other candidates in his bid for a final five-year term.
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NEWS
March 12, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The benevolent autocrat who salvaged Uganda from decades of violence and anarchy faces the toughest challenge of his political career today as voters decide whether to reelect him or follow a trend of change sweeping Africa. President Yoweri Museveni, 56, a former freedom fighter who has been in office for 15 years, is up against five other candidates in his bid for a final five-year term.
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NEWS
May 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Yoweri Museveni, newly sworn in as Uganda's first directly elected president, vowed to press his campaign against the partisan politics that he blames for many of the ills of Africa. "I will continue to campaign aggressively against multi-partyism," the former guerrilla leader said. Museveni--who seized power in 1986--believes parties are divisive and blames them for Uganda's past violence and chaos.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Yoweri Museveni, newly sworn in as Uganda's first directly elected president, vowed to press his campaign against the partisan politics that he blames for many of the ills of Africa. "I will continue to campaign aggressively against multi-partyism," the former guerrilla leader said. Museveni--who seized power in 1986--believes parties are divisive and blames them for Uganda's past violence and chaos.
NEWS
August 10, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The new military leaders of this East African nation banned political gatherings Friday and pledged to free as many as 1,400 prisoners jailed by the ousted government of President Milton Obote. The moves by the regime that took power in a July 27 coup came as Uganda radio appealed for a "splinter group" of soldiers loyal to Obote to lay down their arms, and the government announced "no fundamental change" in its foreign policy of nonalignment. Gen.
NEWS
July 28, 1985 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
President Milton Obote, a powerful political figure in Uganda since the days before the East African nation became independent from Britain, was overthrown Saturday in a coup led by rebellious elements of the army, a radio broadcast from the capital of Kampala announced. The broadcast--by an army officer at 11:30 a.m., local time--proclaimed that the military had brought a "total end of Obote's tribalistic rule."
NEWS
August 10, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The new military leaders of this East African nation banned political gatherings Friday and pledged to free as many as 1,400 prisoners jailed by the ousted government of President Milton Obote. The moves by the regime that took power in a July 27 coup came as Uganda radio appealed for a "splinter group" of soldiers loyal to Obote to lay down their arms, and the government announced "no fundamental change" in its foreign policy of nonalignment. Gen.
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