Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUganda Population
IN THE NEWS

Uganda Population

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Ronald Kyeyune's odyssey started when the soldiers shot his father. With so many soldiers milling about, "we didn't even bury him," Ronald, 15, recalled the other day. "We just ran away." That was the last he saw of any of his family, and the first step in a sequence of hairbreadth escapes. There were times when trucks crowded with children were halted by rebel-hunting soldiers who wanted to shoot them all on the spot. There were officers who ordered their execution and sergeants who helped spirit them to safety.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Ronald Kyeyune's odyssey started when the soldiers shot his father. With so many soldiers milling about, "we didn't even bury him," Ronald, 15, recalled the other day. "We just ran away." That was the last he saw of any of his family, and the first step in a sequence of hairbreadth escapes. There were times when trucks crowded with children were halted by rebel-hunting soldiers who wanted to shoot them all on the spot. There were officers who ordered their execution and sergeants who helped spirit them to safety.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2002 | Scott Sandell, Times Staff Writer
Crikey, mates, look who's chasing crocs! No, not Steve Irwin, that Aussie bloke who hosts "The Crocodile Hunter." It's Jeff Corwin, that American dude who hosts "The Jeff Corwin Experience" on Animal Planet. Aside from the differences in accents and outfits (Irwin wears a dark khaki ensemble; Corwin gallivants around in an impossibly clean blue shirt and light khaki shorts), you could be forgiven for confusing the two.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the sharpest crackdown on the political opposition here since multi-party democracy was legalized last month, the government has arrested four leaders of a key opposition party and charged them with "spreading malicious rumors" about President Daniel Arap Moi and his administration. One of the opposition leaders, Wangari Maathai, a leading environmentalist, was arrested Monday only after she and a crowd of supporters held off police at her home for 24 hours.
WORLD
January 25, 2009 | Edmund Sanders
It took 12 years for Ojwang Santino to feel safe enough to begin rebuilding his home. Each morning before the sun gets too hot, he makes the trek to his ancestral land to smooth new mud walls and work on the thatched roof. But now he doesn't know whether he'll have the courage to move in. He's afraid the Lord's Resistance Army will come back. Santino, a father and grandfather, is one of the 1.
WORLD
October 10, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Olanya Kasimiro thought he would never escape the Lord's Resistance Army when the rebels kidnapped him as a young boy in 1997 and forced him to join their cult-like movement. Three months ago, however, Kasimiro simply walked away from his rebel camp. The 18-year-old former fighter said the militia he left behind was running short on bullets, lacking medicine to treat the sick and scrambling to dig up emergency weapons caches buried around northern Uganda. "They are much weaker," he said.
WORLD
March 8, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
KAMPALA, Uganda - On Sunday mornings, worshipers arrive two hours early to wait in line for one of 200 seats in the Missionaries of the Poor chapel. By the time Mass begins at 8 a.m., they have been joined by 2,000 more parishioners who sit outside in the sun. Roman Catholic churches in Uganda are packed these days, the participants traditional-minded, their faith vibrant and strong. Across Africa, the church reinforces the staunchly conservative values of a population that often attends services several times a week, for hours on end. Catholic leaders also provide homes and food for poor and disadvantaged people whom the state doesn't help, including orphans, abandoned children, the homeless and the disabled.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Margaret Nandawula's father, a once-prosperous trader, sold the family home last year to pay a few doctors and, when they did not help, a few witch doctors, who could not help either. Then he was buried amid the banana trees behind her grandparents' house here, gone before 35. This year, Margaret's mother was buried next to him. Margaret, 13, and her five brothers and sisters were orphaned by the disease that people here call "slim"--acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|