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February 23, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The customs still practiced in this lush East African nation are strikingly archaic: Women expected to kneel when serving food to their husbands. Mothers forbidden permanent custody of children after a divorce. Men "inheriting" widows of their deceased brothers. Legal polygamy. Yet Uganda has become a key testing ground for a radical political experiment. All elected bodies, from village councils to the national parliament, must have a minimum number of women. In a word, quotas.
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WORLD
April 29, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
KASANA, Uganda - When Joyce Birabwa's husband was killed in a suicide bomb attack in Mogadishu, 1,000 miles away, her whole world fell apart. Left to raise two children alone, Birabwa barely had time to grieve before discovering her in-laws had plans that would leave her penniless. First, they grabbed the land and cows her husband, Eriya Kabuye, kept in a rural village outside the central Ugandan town where the couple rented a house. And then there was the compensation for the 2010 death of Kabuye, 27, a Ugandan soldier who served in an international peacekeeping force in Somalia.
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WORLD
April 29, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
KASANA, Uganda - When Joyce Birabwa's husband was killed in a suicide bomb attack in Mogadishu, 1,000 miles away, her whole world fell apart. Left to raise two children alone, Birabwa barely had time to grieve before discovering her in-laws had plans that would leave her penniless. First, they grabbed the land and cows her husband, Eriya Kabuye, kept in a rural village outside the central Ugandan town where the couple rented a house. And then there was the compensation for the 2010 death of Kabuye, 27, a Ugandan soldier who served in an international peacekeeping force in Somalia.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS and ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The customs still practiced in this lush East African nation are strikingly archaic: Women expected to kneel when serving food to their husbands. Mothers forbidden permanent custody of children after a divorce. Men "inheriting" widows of their deceased brothers. Legal polygamy. Yet Uganda has become a key testing ground for a radical political experiment. All elected bodies, from village councils to the national parliament, must have a minimum number of women. In a word, quotas.
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