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WORLD
May 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- What happens when the president doesn't like what the media say? Uganda just found that out, when two newspapers that published a letter from a general attacking President Yoweri Museveni's increasingly autocratic leadership style were closed down for 10 days, declared "crime scenes," raided by police and pressed to reveal the story's source. On Wednesday, journalists who protested were tear-gassed. Rumors swirled that the government would keep the Daily Monitor, widely seen as a serious daily newspaper, and its more sensationalist rival Red Pepper closed until they went bankrupt, Ugandan journalists said in phone interviews Thursday, describing an atmosphere of fear and intimidation.
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WORLD
March 24, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon said Monday that it is stepping up the search for fugitive rebel leader Joseph Kony in Central Africa, deploying 150 Air Force special operations troops and four tilt-rotor transport planes to Uganda to help with the manhunt. The aircraft -- V-22 Ospreys that can land and take off like helicopters -- will be used to move African troops and their U.S. advisors faster and farther across the vast distances in the  countries where Kony's Lord's Resistance Army operates.
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WORLD
April 3, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Uganda's military has suspended its hunt for notorious warlord Joseph Kony after rebels toppled the president of the Central African Republic last month. Kony, indicted by the International Criminal Court on charges of crimes against humanity, is believed to be hiding in the eastern Central African Republic with his Lord's Resistance Army of several hundred fighters. A spokesman for the Ugandan military, Felix Kulayigye, told journalists Wednesday that Seleka, the rebel alliance that ousted Central African Republic President Francois Bozize, isn't willing to cooperate with the Kony hunt, so the operation had been suspended.
WORLD
February 24, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Human rights groups and Western leaders condemned harsh anti-gay legislation signed into law Monday by Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni, calling it draconian, offensive and an affront to basic rights. But Ugandan officials and parliamentarians, including David Bahati, who introduced the law in parliament, celebrated the move. Bahati posted a thank you message to Museveni on his Facebook page: "If you are involved in the gay and lesbianism lifestyle you are liable to life imprisonment.
NEWS
February 15, 1987 | From Reuters
At least 36 people died in a continuing cholera outbreak in and around the Ugandan capital in the first two months of the year, health authorities reported late last week. They added that a special cholera unit has been set up at Kampala's Mulago Hospital.
WORLD
May 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The joint United Nations-African Union mission in Sudan's Darfur region said a Ugandan member of the peacekeeping force had been fatally shot. He was the first member slain since the troops deployed five months ago. John Kennedy Okecha was found dead Wednesday in a peacekeeper vehicle on the outskirts of the Zam Zam refugee camp. He had been wounded in the neck, chest and stomach. U.N. peacekeeping chief Jean-Marie Guehenno warned this month of an increase in violence in Darfur, where hundreds of thousands are estimated to have died since 2003.
WORLD
February 18, 2011 | By Emmanuel Gyezaho and Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
Ugandans voted Friday in an election that saw President Yoweri Museveni seeking a fourth term after 25 years in power and his rival Kizza Besigye vowing a parallel vote count to guard against fraud. Museveni, 66, is widely expected to win another five years in office, with final results expected Sunday. But Besigye has announced plans to try to whip up Egypt-style protest rallies if the election is seen as tainted. There was a heavy police and military presence in many parts of the country, and clashes between opposition supporters and police were reported in some districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Phiona Mutesi's journey from a Ugandan slum to the world stage as champion chess player was inspired by hunger. "I was yearning for porridge," the 16-year-old Mutesi said as she recalled how one day in 2005 she followed her brother to a place where poor kids gathered and she knew she would get food. There she met Robert Katende, a missionary, who was trying to improve the lives of local Ugandan children by teaching them to play chess on boards spread out on the dirt. Those who showed up got a free bowl of porridge.
WORLD
March 8, 2012 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Even after decades of well-documented murder and plunder, even after the International Criminal Court indicted him and a U.S. president dispatched a special forces team to help catch him, African warlord Joseph Kony remained largely obscure to the West. That changed with startling swiftness this week, with the viral proliferation of a smoothly produced 29-minute video, "Kony 2012," that calculatedly taps the power of social media in an effort to make the fugitive leader of the Lord's Resistance Army a figure of global infamy.
WORLD
August 12, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
A former university librarian on Thursday said he wanted to kill as many Americans as possible in bomb attacks that killed 76 people in the Ugandan capital last month. In a public confession at a news conference in Kampala arranged by Ugandan military intelligence, Issa Ahmed Luyima said he planned the July 11 attacks and roped his younger brother and others into the plot. His motive was a deep hatred of Americans, the 33-year-old Ugandan said. "My rage was with the Americans whom I deemed responsible for all the suffering of Muslims around the world," he was quoted as saying by news agency reports.
WORLD
December 20, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Uganda's parliament on Friday passed tough anti-gay legislation that will punish those found guilty of "aggravated homosexuality" with life in jail. While same-sex marriage has been enshrined in a growing number of Western countries, human rights advocates say gay rights are receding in much of Africa. Homosexual acts have long been illegal in Uganda and many other parts of the continent, where gays and lesbians are at risk of being beaten up, jailed and even killed.
WORLD
November 12, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- After 19 years of fighting in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, diplomats and envoys gathered for the signing of a deal to seal the defeat of the Congolese rebel group, M23. But the Congolese government and M23 couldn't even agree to get into the same room in Uganda late Monday. The deal, which appeared to offer the first glimmer of hope for peace in years, went unsigned. The hitch? Whether the document was to be called an “agreement” or a “declaration.” The agreement, understanding, deal or declaration was supposed to lay down the process for the disarming and demobilization of M23. Under its terms, lower-ranking soldiers were to be integrated into the Congolese army.
WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Congo's M23 rebels, the latest in a succession of militias responsible for horrific attacks on civilians in the east of the country, effectively surrendered Tuesday when they announced that they were laying down their arms and disbanding. The announcement comes after the Democratic Republic of Congo's army heavily bombarded two hills overnight, Chanzu and Runyonyi, the last rebel strongholds. In recent days the rebels abandoned a swath of territory, including many towns and villages, after being overpowered by Congolese army attacks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In a time when states are ratifying gay marriage at a record pace and the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy is old news, when the Boy Scouts of America reverse a controversial policy and now accept gay scouts, "Call Me Kuchu," a documentary on Uganda's gay rights debate, hits like a series of shock waves. Filmmakers Katherine Fairfax Wright and Malika Zouhali-Worrall use understatement in laying out the explosive realities of life in Uganda for the LGBT community, the so-called kuchus.
WORLD
May 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- What happens when the president doesn't like what the media say? Uganda just found that out, when two newspapers that published a letter from a general attacking President Yoweri Museveni's increasingly autocratic leadership style were closed down for 10 days, declared "crime scenes," raided by police and pressed to reveal the story's source. On Wednesday, journalists who protested were tear-gassed. Rumors swirled that the government would keep the Daily Monitor, widely seen as a serious daily newspaper, and its more sensationalist rival Red Pepper closed until they went bankrupt, Ugandan journalists said in phone interviews Thursday, describing an atmosphere of fear and intimidation.
WORLD
May 4, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
KAMPALA, Uganda - He is a celebrity across eastern and central Africa, a gospel music star known to many as the "Dancing Priest. " But for years he also was a keeper of painful secrets - his own and many others'. In going public, Anthony Musaala has forced the Roman Catholic Church in Uganda to confront a problem it had insisted didn't exist. And he may stir a debate far beyond Africa's most Catholic of countries. The Ugandan priest has been suspended indefinitely by the archbishop of Kampala for exposing what he calls an open secret: Sex abuse in the Catholic Church is a problem in Africa as well as in Western Europe and North America.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Martin Miller, Los Angeles Times
The idea that Salt Lake City could be a paradise is meant to be absurdly funny to the big city folks piling into the touring production of "The Book of Mormon" now at the Pantages Theatre. As it turns out, the notion is also humorous to someone from Lincoln, Neb. "I've never been to Salt Lake," said Nebraskan Samantha Marie Ware, who stars as the innocent Ugandan teen Nabulungi in the Tony Award-winning musical. "Maybe I'll make it there soon. " Ware's song "Sal Tlay Ka Siti" - what the Utah capital sounds like when pronounced with a heavy Central African accent - marks a critical moment in the hit musical created by "South Park's" Trey Parker and Matt Stone along with composer and lyricist Robert Lopez.
SPORTS
January 27, 2012 | Chris Dufresne
Ayeet Timothy Odeke, basketball coach at Nkumba University in Kampala, gets the look - the same one Bill Walton might have given John Wooden years ago - when he instructs his players on the proper way to put on their socks and lace up their shoes at the start of each season. "If you didn't get the words, the face would talk to you," Odeke explained. "Are you mad? Are you crazy?" It was 10 years ago, at a basketball clinic in Uganda, when Odeke was exposed to certain Wooden life lessons for the first time: Don't mistake activity with achievement.
OPINION
April 14, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A bill before Parliament in Uganda would prohibit women from wearing miniskirts in public. The government's ethics minister, Simon Lokodo, has taken the lead in defending it. "Anything above the knee is outlawed," he said. "If a woman wears a miniskirt, we will arrest her. " If the bill were to become law, Uganda would hardly be the first country to institute harsh restrictions on women's dress in public. Saudi Arabia, for instance, famously expects women to be shrouded head to toe in public.
WORLD
April 3, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Uganda's military has suspended its hunt for notorious warlord Joseph Kony after rebels toppled the president of the Central African Republic last month. Kony, indicted by the International Criminal Court on charges of crimes against humanity, is believed to be hiding in the eastern Central African Republic with his Lord's Resistance Army of several hundred fighters. A spokesman for the Ugandan military, Felix Kulayigye, told journalists Wednesday that Seleka, the rebel alliance that ousted Central African Republic President Francois Bozize, isn't willing to cooperate with the Kony hunt, so the operation had been suspended.
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