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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Remember when you had to jiggle an antenna on your TV set to get good reception for a UHF signal? Well, those days are long gone and the Federal Communications Commission thinks it is time to stop treating a UHF channel as a weak sister to a VHF channel. For those of you born after the days of rabbit ears, UHF stands for ultra high frequency and refers to channels above 13. A UHF signal was not as strong as a VHF signal. VHF stands for very high frequency and refers to channels 2 through 13. Why "ultra" was weaker than "very" when it seems that it should have been the other way around will just have to remain a mystery.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before figuring out what shows to drop from my DVR. The Skinny: Last season, I got hooked on ABC's "Nashville. " Unfortunately, the rest of the country didn't follow my lead, and ABC started to turn the show about country music artists into another guilty-pleasure soap. I watched last night's season premiere and it was as if NFL RedZone had produced the show. It was nothing but quick cuts from silly plot line to sillier plot line. Bummer. Thursday's headlines include an important FCC proceeding on TV ownership rules and reviews of new sitcoms from Michael J. Fox and Robin Williams.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before figuring out what shows to drop from my DVR. The Skinny: Last season, I got hooked on ABC's "Nashville. " Unfortunately, the rest of the country didn't follow my lead, and ABC started to turn the show about country music artists into another guilty-pleasure soap. I watched last night's season premiere and it was as if NFL RedZone had produced the show. It was nothing but quick cuts from silly plot line to sillier plot line. Bummer. Thursday's headlines include an important FCC proceeding on TV ownership rules and reviews of new sitcoms from Michael J. Fox and Robin Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Remember when you had to jiggle an antenna on your TV set to get good reception for a UHF signal? Well, those days are long gone and the Federal Communications Commission thinks it is time to stop treating a UHF channel as a weak sister to a VHF channel. For those of you born after the days of rabbit ears, UHF stands for ultra high frequency and refers to channels above 13. A UHF signal was not as strong as a VHF signal. VHF stands for very high frequency and refers to channels 2 through 13. Why "ultra" was weaker than "very" when it seems that it should have been the other way around will just have to remain a mystery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1996
Rita Lepicier raises an apt point ("KMEX: L.A.'s Forgotten Star," Counterpunch, Dec. 25). Spanish-language broadcasters--and publishers--have had to wrestle with the problem of under-recognition for many years. I am reminded of the pioneering efforts of Angel Lerma-Mahler, who first brought Hispanic television to Los Angeles with his long-running Channel 13 show, "Panorama Latino," years before there was commercial UHF programming here--even before XEWT lit up on Channel 12 down in Tijuana.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1985 | DAVID CROOK and THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writers
In the recent feast of corporate mergers involving media companies, three of those who have come to the table--media baron Rupert Murdoch, cable-TV entrepreneur Ted Turner and Chicago-based Tribune Co.--appear interested in what up to now has seemed a vain desire: launching a fourth television network. In the first 40 years of television, at least three others have attempted to break into the network oligopoly, with little result.
NEWS
December 11, 1985
UHF-TV Channel 16 was allocated Tuesday by the Federal Communications Commission to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department so that it can modernize an "outmoded and inadequate" emergency communications system.
NEWS
September 10, 1985 | (UPI)
An $85-million satellite launched from the shuttle Discovery Aug. 29 has broken down, officials said Monday, threatening to deal another crippling blow to the ailing aerospace insurance industry. Engineers scrambled to find a way to activate the UHF communications system on the military relay station by remote control, but they were not optimistic. "We're not yet claiming it as a complete loss," said Penelope Longbottom, a spokesman for Hughes Communications Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
In "UHF" (citywide), writer-star "Weird Al" Yankovic tries to jam dozens of movie and TV parodies into the kind of dopes-on-the-job plot that was already a self-parody in the days of the first "Police Academy." The parodies are sometimes amusing, in a talk-back-to-the-TV-screen sort of way, but the movie they're stuck in is beyond sendups. It's another daffy, goofy, sex-crazed-guys story: "The daffy, goofy, sex-crazed guys take over a TV station."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1987 | MICHAEL ABRAMOWITZ, The Washington Post
Wednesday morning, members of Congress and federal regulators are expected to get a firsthand look at what broadcasters hope will be the television picture of the 21st Century. If all goes well, a special transmitter at Washington's WUSA-TV Channel 9 will begin beaming videotape of the 1984 Olympic Games to special receivers located in the Capitol and the offices of the Federal Communications Commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1996
Rita Lepicier raises an apt point ("KMEX: L.A.'s Forgotten Star," Counterpunch, Dec. 25). Spanish-language broadcasters--and publishers--have had to wrestle with the problem of under-recognition for many years. I am reminded of the pioneering efforts of Angel Lerma-Mahler, who first brought Hispanic television to Los Angeles with his long-running Channel 13 show, "Panorama Latino," years before there was commercial UHF programming here--even before XEWT lit up on Channel 12 down in Tijuana.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County's only commercial broadcast station, KDOC-TV (Channel 56), pulled the plug on reruns of "Combat" two years ago. What a mistake. "You would have thought that I took their firstborn as hostage," said Chuck Velona, the station's general manager. "The switchboard lit up for days. We found out that it does draw viewers."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1992 | RYAN MURPHY
The last time we saw Morticia Addams, she was knitting something very, very small. It's a boy. In a first draft of the script for Paramount Pictures' "Addams Family II," the sequel to the 1991 holiday hit, Morticia gives birth to a son, Pubert, who is the spitting image of Gomez. But who will care for the child? Naughty siblings Wednesday and Pugsley torture the first string of nanny applicants (they set one on fire, send another out of the house wearing a straitjacket).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1990 | RICHARD MAHLER
The fate of a black-owned public-television station in Los Angeles that has been kept off the air for more than 2 1/2 years has stalled within the Federal Communications Commission. "Nothing official is happening on the case pending a recommendation by the (FCC) general counsel's office on a request to disqualify the judge assigned to hear the case," explained Rod Porter, deputy chief of the regulatory agency's Mass Media Bureau.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
In "UHF" (citywide), writer-star "Weird Al" Yankovic tries to jam dozens of movie and TV parodies into the kind of dopes-on-the-job plot that was already a self-parody in the days of the first "Police Academy." The parodies are sometimes amusing, in a talk-back-to-the-TV-screen sort of way, but the movie they're stuck in is beyond sendups. It's another daffy, goofy, sex-crazed-guys story: "The daffy, goofy, sex-crazed guys take over a TV station."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1988 | KEVIN BRASS
It has always been an ignominious existence for KCST-TV (Channel 39), which begins life anew on Friday as KNSD, "Bringing it straight to you." This is a station that has never been able to get any respect. In the '60s, the ABC television network shunned Channel 39 and its weak UHF signal, preferring to hook up with the Mexican-based XETV (Channel 6). It took a long, bitter court battle to force ABC to dump Channel 6 and latch on with with the best available American station, KCST.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1988 | KEVIN BRASS
It has always been an ignominious existence for KCST-TV (Channel 39), which begins life anew on Friday as KNSD, "Bringing it straight to you." This is a station that has never been able to get any respect. In the '60s, the ABC television network shunned Channel 39 and its weak UHF signal, preferring to hook up with the Mexican-based XETV (Channel 6). It took a long, bitter court battle to force ABC to dump Channel 6 and latch on with with the best available American station, KCST.
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