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WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Sixteen people were killed in a clash between Chinese police and ethnic Uighurs near the far western city of Kashgar, one of a string of similar incidents in the ethnically divided region. The regional government's website said police were trying to make arrests at 11 p.m. local time Sunday when they were attacked by people who “threw explosive devices and wielded knives. " “The police dealt with it decisively and shot 14 thugs to death," Tianshannet, the website of the Xinjiang region, reported.
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WORLD
March 13, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - At least four people were reported dead after knife-wielding assailants stabbed and slashed passers-by Friday morning in Changsha, in China's south-central Hunan province. Witnesses described the assailants as Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking minority from northwestern China's Xinjiang region. Militants from that region were implicated in a knifing rampage March 1 that left 33 people dead at a train station in Kunming, China. 12:15 a.m. update: The death toll from Friday's knife attack in Changsha has reached six. Initial witness reports indicated that members of a Turkic minority from northwestern China could have been involved.
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WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Police in China's far western Xinjiang region killed eight people Monday when a group wielding knives and throwing explosives attacked a police station, local authorities said. The official Xinhua news agency referred to the incident in Yarkand county as a “terrorist attack,” and the incident comes just two weeks after 16 people were reported killed in a clash between police and ethnic Uighurs near the city of Kashgar, in the same vicinity. Uighurs, a mostly Muslim ethnic minority more closely related to the Turks than the Chinese, complain of harassment and discrimination at the hands of authorities in Xinjiang.
WORLD
March 2, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
KUNMING, China - Deng Wei, his wife and 8-month-old baby were having dinner in a little restaurant in an alleyway next to this city's main train station Saturday night when a man and a woman, both in black, came striding by, clutching large knives. “They were headed toward the station, and I decided to follow them, at a distance. They began slashing people, and when they passed the police kiosk on the corner of the square, the officers did nothing to stop them,” Deng, 26, recalled Sunday in front of the station.
WORLD
June 14, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Sipping guava juice under cover from a steamy tropical downpour, Tommy Remengesau Jr. says he's always considered his Pacific island home a refuge from the troubles of the outside world. "While the rest of the planet was in conflict, waging its wars, we remained a little piece of paradise," the former Palauan president said as his pet fruit bat swayed upside down in a nearby cage. "Now, the world's headaches have come home to roost in Palau."
OPINION
February 21, 2011
It's a high compliment when someone seeks to live in a country that imprisoned and abused him. That's what five Chinese Muslims held at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility want to do, but they're encountering resistance from the Justice Department. It is urging the Supreme Court not to review an appeals court decision holding that a judge may not release them into this country. The Muslims, members of an ethnic group called the Uighurs who want independence from China, had traveled to Afghanistan, where Uighur military training camps had been set up. After the United States launched a military offensive in Afghanistan, they and others were captured by Pakistani and other coalition forces and brought to Guantanamo.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | By Michael McGough
With the release of the remaining three Uighur inmates at Guantanamo Bay, the Obama administration has ended one of the most poignant chapters in the story of the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. It's no longer controversial that many of the men who ended up at Guantanamo were bystanders and wannabes, not anti-American terrorists, and the 22 Uighurs -- Muslims from Western China -- were an especially sympathetic group.  The Uighurs had traveled to Afghanistan, where they joined training camps run by a Uighur separatist group.
OPINION
March 2, 2009
Re "Free the Uighurs," editorial, Feb. 23 We are writing to express our deep concern about The Times' appeal to release 17 Chinese Uighur terror suspects detained at Guantanamo. The Chinese Uighurs are not average people -- they are suspected members of the East Turkestan Islamic Movement, which has been listed as an international terrorist group by the United Nations. We believe the ETIM has long been colluding with Al Qaeda, Taliban remnants, Chechen terrorist groups and other international terrorist organizations.
WORLD
April 24, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- In the deadliest ethnic violence in China since 2009, 21 people were killed in confrontations Tuesday between police and Uighur residents of Kashgar, the country's westernmost city. Among the dead were 15 police and neighborhood security officers and six people that the state media described as “mobsters. " Kashgar, which lies close to China's borders with Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan, has been a frequent site of violence between the dominant ethnic Han Chinese and the Uighurs, a Muslim minority.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2010 | By David G. Savage
The Supreme Court backed away Monday from a confrontation with the Obama administration and Congress over the handling of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, who are judged to be wrongly held as "enemy combatants." The justices dismissed a case brought on behalf of 17 Chinese Muslims, or Uighurs, who were held as prisoners at Guantanamo even after a judge ruled they deserved to go free. Congress and the Justice Department balked at a judge's plan to release them into the United States.
WORLD
March 1, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
China's state media called Saturday night's knifing attack at a train station in Kunming “China's 9/11” and called for a crackdown on terrorism. The death toll from the attack rose to 33 with four of the perpetrators among the dead. One suspect is in custody, a woman, who was reported to be hospitalized. The perpetrators were said to be Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking Muslim minority from northwestern China's Xinjiang region. Chinese authorities showed on a television station a black flag recovered at the scene which they said was calling for independence for the region that some Uighurs refer to as East Turkestan.
WORLD
January 17, 2014 | By Julie Makinen, This post has been updated. See the note below for details
BEIJING -- The U.S. government and human rights activists are voicing concern about the detention of a professor who has been an outspoken advocate for China's Uighur minority group.  Ilham Tohti's home in Beijing was ransacked Wednesday afternoon by more than 20 police officers who seized computers, phones, credit cards and documents and took him into custody, his wife, Guzaili Nu'er, said by phone Friday. About 10 officers remained posted outside, she said, adding that she has had no contact with Tohti for 48 hours, and authorities have refused to divulge his whereabouts.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | By Michael McGough
With the release of the remaining three Uighur inmates at Guantanamo Bay, the Obama administration has ended one of the most poignant chapters in the story of the detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. It's no longer controversial that many of the men who ended up at Guantanamo were bystanders and wannabes, not anti-American terrorists, and the 22 Uighurs -- Muslims from Western China -- were an especially sympathetic group.  The Uighurs had traveled to Afghanistan, where they joined training camps run by a Uighur separatist group.
WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Police in China's far western Xinjiang region killed eight people Monday when a group wielding knives and throwing explosives attacked a police station, local authorities said. The official Xinhua news agency referred to the incident in Yarkand county as a “terrorist attack,” and the incident comes just two weeks after 16 people were reported killed in a clash between police and ethnic Uighurs near the city of Kashgar, in the same vicinity. Uighurs, a mostly Muslim ethnic minority more closely related to the Turks than the Chinese, complain of harassment and discrimination at the hands of authorities in Xinjiang.
WORLD
December 16, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Sixteen people were killed in a clash between Chinese police and ethnic Uighurs near the far western city of Kashgar, one of a string of similar incidents in the ethnically divided region. The regional government's website said police were trying to make arrests at 11 p.m. local time Sunday when they were attacked by people who “threw explosive devices and wielded knives. " “The police dealt with it decisively and shot 14 thugs to death," Tianshannet, the website of the Xinjiang region, reported.
WORLD
October 31, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - At a restaurant with an arbor of green plastic grape leaves out front and a grill inside for skewers of roast lamb, police have been popping in regularly the last two days to check residency documents of ethnic Uighurs. In the same neighborhood, a Uighur family who had moved into their apartment a few days ago were told to leave immediately, although they paid their rent a month in advance. The midday attack this week at Tiananmen Square has made the Uighurs the least favored ethnic minority in Beijing for the moment.
WORLD
October 31, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - At a restaurant with an arbor of green plastic grape leaves out front and a grill inside for skewers of roast lamb, police have been popping in regularly the last two days to check residency documents of ethnic Uighurs. In the same neighborhood, a Uighur family who had moved into their apartment a few days ago were told to leave immediately, although they paid their rent a month in advance. The midday attack this week at Tiananmen Square has made the Uighurs the least favored ethnic minority in Beijing for the moment.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
Lawyers for 17 Chinese Muslims held at the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to order their clients' release into the United States. The Muslims, members of the Uighur minority from China's Xinjiang region, have been held without charge at Guantanamo Bay for more than seven years despite their military jailers' concession years ago that they posed no threat to the United States.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- More than 48 hours after a car plowed down pedestrians and burst into flames at Beijing's Tiananmen Square, the Chinese government broke its near-silence on the incident and characterized it as a “terrorist attack. " Chinese state media on Wednesday identified the people in the car as members of one family --- the driver, Usmen Hasan; his mother, Kuwanhan Reyim; and his wife, Gulkiz Gini. All three were killed, along with two tourists. Chinese authorities also said five people were arrested as accessories in Beijing on Monday night.
WORLD
October 28, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - Chinese authorities were scouring Beijing for suspects from a region of northwestern China with a large Muslim population after a brazen attack at Tiananmen Square the day before that left five people dead. In what could hardly have been a more audacious attack at the spiritual heart of China, a white sport-utility vehicle entered a sidewalk at the Beijing square midday Monday and drove nearly 500 yards, plowing through tourists and police, until it crashed near the iconic portrait of Mao Tse-tung that hangs over a main gate in the square.
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