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Uk La 88 Festival

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1988 | RICHARD CROMELIN
POP The Beatles. The Stones. Zeppelin. Elton. The Pistols. The Clash. Costello. The Cure. Considering Britain's monumental contributions to pop music over the past 25 years, not to mention its current productivity, you might have expected the UK/LA Festival to bounce to a prominent rock beat. But the only significant pop entry was the L.A. debut of the eclectic Penguin Cafe Orchestra.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Art What is an Ukla anyway? Would an Ukla by any other name smell so sweet? Is an Ukla something that burns bright in the forest of the night? We are not sure what an Ukla is but we heard there was one in town. Maybe it's one of those beasts that's too big to see up close, like a helaphump. Oh, UK/LA , the United Kingdom/Los Angeles festival. Sure, we heard about that. David Hockney. That's it.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1988 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
They came, they saw, they did lunch. The Duke and Duchess of York delivered in a big way for the UK/LA '88 festival on Wednesday, touring the work of British-born painter David Hockney before spending an evening at the Los Angeles Philharmonic. After Tuesday's hands-on fun at a special-effects studio, Wednesday was hands-behind-the-back, Windsor-style. They strolled through the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, looking at Old Masters and old silver, before lunching with the Board of Supervisors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
Organizers of "UK/LA: '88--A Celebration of British Arts," which ended Sunday, say their festival was a success. But some prominent local participants aren't so sure. "Our purpose was to do a collaboration between L.A. and the United Kingdom, and to heighten the profile of British arts and culture in the Southland," said festival coordinator Bruce Joseph. "That was achieved very admirably."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1988 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
Now then, what did nanny always tell you? After you've first gone to fund-raising dinners and museums and boutique openings like good little dukes and duchesses, then you get to go to a movie studio and smash a whiskey bottle over your secretary's head and scare yourself half to death on a roller-coaster ride. And see? Nanny was right.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
You wouldn't think of David Cale as a shy guy. But he is. "Painfully shy," said the man who spends his evenings alone on stage telling stories to an audience of complete strangers. "It's curious, because I really am very shy--and what I do isn't." To use the current popular term, the British-born Cale, 28, is a monologuist. His newest piece, "The Redthroats," which opened Friday at Taper, Too, is part of the UK / LA '88 Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
George Bernard Shaw may have made his tart joke about Britain and America being divided by a common language. But in practical fact, the shared language has led to an interrelationship in arts and letters between two powerful nations that is without exact parallel in the world. In the early years of the Republic, an Englishman sneeringly asked, "Who reads an American book?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1988 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
Won't someone please give these two kids a couple of margaritas and some nachos? If the UK/LA festival is all about Britain meeting California, then on Monday, Britain was winning.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1988 | ZAN DUBIN
Organizers of "UK/LA: '88--A Celebration of British Arts," which ended Sunday, say their festival was a success. But some prominent local participants aren't so sure. "Our purpose was to do a collaboration between L.A. and the United Kingdom, and to heighten the profile of British arts and culture in the Southland," said festival coordinator Bruce Joseph. "That was achieved very admirably."
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
The Southern California visit of the Duke and Duchess of York has been profiled and pounded by two London newspapers as a brash, vulgar, excessive, weak-humored exhibition by two royals flushed with a touch of lower middle class. Now Los Angeles has put up its dukes--as if in defense of its own youngsters, and certainly in protection of a young couple it clearly has adopted, received and perceived as crown jewels. "I'm offended by the criticism, absolutely," snapped the city official.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Today 'INVOCATION: MAYA DEREN'/'SEEING FOR OURSELVES' Goodson, 6:30 p . m. Two-part program with a feminist slant. Best is JoAnn Kaplan's sympathetic documentary on American avant-garde film maker Maya Deren--whose darkly sexual Bohemian image and bizarre blend of interests (dance, radical politics and voodoo) made her a figure ahead of her time.
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