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October 10, 2010 | By Jack Peters, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Position No. 6128: White to play and win. From the game Shane Matthews-Pradeep Seegolam, 39th Olympiad, Khanty-Mansiysk 2010. Solution to Position No. 6127: White wins with 1 Bxf7!, as 1?Rxh1 allows 2 Bxe6! Qxe6 3 Qc7 mate. Ukraine, the second seed, won the 39th Olympiad in Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia. The five-man team went undefeated, winning eight matches and drawing three in the 148-team competition. Ukraine was led by Vassily Ivanchuk, whose 8-2 score (a 2890 performance)
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WORLD
April 27, 2014 | Sergei L. Loiko
They sat at a long table, appearing tense and tired Sunday as they looked over the heads of gathered journalists toward the armed, masked men in unmarked uniforms sitting at the back of the nearly empty auditorium. Then the leader of the unsmiling group on stage spoke. They were “guests” of self-proclaimed mayor of Slovyansk, Vyacheslav Ponomaryov, “a man of honor” at whose initiative they were holding this news conference in “this bizarre situation,” said Col. Axel Schneider, a German.
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WORLD
February 7, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
When it comes to messy politics -- and old-fashioned entertainment -- it's hard to top the theatrics of the relatively young democracy in Ukraine. Here are a few choice moments from the presidential campaign that ended with Sunday's runoff election: While on a campaign stop in the western city of Lviv -- an area typically unreceptive to his historically pro-Russia politics -- candidate Viktor Yanukovich had an embarrassing slip of the tongue, Ukrainian...
WORLD
April 26, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
SLOVYANSK, Ukraine -- Pro-Russia gunmen refused Saturday to release a group of European observers and accompanying Ukrainian army officers seized a day earlier in this eastern Ukrainian town, the epicenter of the pro-Moscow rebellion. “These guys are not hostages, but they are our POWs and we intend to keep them in custody,” Vyacheslav Ponomaryov, a local separatist leader and self-proclaimed mayor of Slovyansk, said in an interview with The Times. “They are NATO officers and spies who infiltrated our territory illegally, without our permission.” The Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe inspectors -- from Germany, Poland, Denmark, Czech Republic and Sweden -- “represent the countries which supply the illegitimate government in Kiev with arms and money,” Ponomaryov added.
OPINION
April 25, 2014
Re “Biden in Ukraine in show of support,” April 22 For a nation that espouses democracy, the U.S. is showing its dictatorial side in Ukraine. We have no more business being involved in Ukraine than I do in the marital affairs of the couple down the street. We decry Russia putting troops on its border with Ukraine, but we then put our troops in Poland and ships in the Black Sea on its border. At least the Russians are in their own domain; we are not. Phil Wilt Van Nuys As the Russians consolidate their hold on Crimea and begin their move into the rest of Ukraine, as the Iranians move toward a nuclear weapon capability that will change the balance of power in the Middle East, and as the Chinese expand their territorial claims into the waters of their neighbors, President Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of State John F. Kerry threaten “consequences” and try to engage each of them in negotiations that inevitably will lead nowhere.
WORLD
December 12, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine -- As thousands of pro-European-integration protesters were rebuilding barricades in Kiev's Independence Square which were destroyed the previous day by police, Russian President Vladimir Putin maintained a focus Thursday on Ukraine. Putin, in his annual state of the union address, said that Ukraine's leaders are continuing to consult with Moscow about about post-Soviet economic reintegration. “Even before all these [protests] which we now see in Kiev … Ukraine more than once declared its interest in joining some agreements of the customs union [with Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan]
WORLD
April 30, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Ukraine violated the rights of former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko by jailing her for political reasons during her trial in 2011, the European Court of Human Rights ruled Tuesday. Tymoshenko, an opponent of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich's government, is serving seven years in prison for allegedly abusing her powers while negotiating a gas deal with Russia while she was prime minister. Many critics condemned her trial as politically motivated. The charismatic opposition leader claims to have been mistreated while in detention and has brought several complaints to the European human rights court about her case.
WORLD
December 10, 2013 | By Victoria Butenko and Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine -- The four men who have served as Ukraine's presidents since independence held an unusual meeting Tuesday, but failed to break the stalemate in the country's worst political crisis since its 2004 Orange Revolution. In a nationally televised round-table discussion with his three predecessors, incumbent President Viktor Yanukovich offered tokens of reconciliation to his political opposition, but nothing that was likely to end the demonstrations that have roiled Kiev, the capital, for nearly two weeks.
WORLD
December 1, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine -- The political confrontation between President Viktor Yanukovich and his opposition reached fever pitch Sunday as protesters, armed with flares and bricks, attempted to storm the Presidential Administration building. But just as the demonstration threatened to veer into hand-to-hand combat between protesters and police, Vitali Klitschko, the 6-foot-7-inch super heavyweight boxing champion and opposition leader, broke through the lines of attackers. Towering two heads over the crowd, he raised his arms and shouted at the top of his lungs for both sides to stop fighting.
OPINION
December 12, 2013 | By John Bolton
Ukraine's civil conflict strikes many Americans as a distant and unimportant dispute, one hardly connected to their daily lives. Such a lack of interest in international affairs is understandable, perhaps, because of the focus on economic recovery since 2008, but it's badly misplaced given the stakes involved, not just in eastern and central Europe but around the world. More alarming, and far less justifiable, as a cause for such inattention is the failure of America's national political leadership.
OPINION
April 25, 2014
Re “Biden in Ukraine in show of support,” April 22 For a nation that espouses democracy, the U.S. is showing its dictatorial side in Ukraine. We have no more business being involved in Ukraine than I do in the marital affairs of the couple down the street. We decry Russia putting troops on its border with Ukraine, but we then put our troops in Poland and ships in the Black Sea on its border. At least the Russians are in their own domain; we are not. Phil Wilt Van Nuys As the Russians consolidate their hold on Crimea and begin their move into the rest of Ukraine, as the Iranians move toward a nuclear weapon capability that will change the balance of power in the Middle East, and as the Chinese expand their territorial claims into the waters of their neighbors, President Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of State John F. Kerry threaten “consequences” and try to engage each of them in negotiations that inevitably will lead nowhere.
WORLD
April 25, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Separatist gunmen occupying the volatile eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk detained a 13-member team of military analysts from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe Friday in defiance of international agreements signed by Russia and Ukraine. The German-led OSCE team was on a mission to evaluate a potential security threat and operating under a treaty provision known as the Vienna Document, which obliges the OSCE's 57 member states to "consult and cooperate in case of unusual military activity or increasing tensions.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By David Horsey
Besides sending a chill up the spine of the international community, Vladimir Putin has accomplished one other thing by seizing Crimea and threatening the rest of Ukraine: Putin has brought back the bear.  Like Uncle Sam, the Republican elephant and the Democratic donkey, the Russian bear was a stock character in decades of political cartoons drawn by pretty much every caricaturist in the business, including me. The dissertation I wrote for my...
WORLD
April 25, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
SEOUL -- President Obama conceded Friday that sanctions on Russia may not force President Vladimir Putin to alter his decisions on Ukraine, but he then offered a spirited defense of how they might still influence a leader he said is “not a stupid man.” Putin surely realizes that sanctions have hurt the Russian economy, Obama said, and knows there is much more pain ahead if he doesn't live up to his pledge to ease tensions in Ukraine, where Russian-speaking...
WORLD
April 25, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
SLOVYANSK, Ukraine - At the epicenter of the pro-Russia rebellion in eastern Ukraine, masked men on Friday raced around in commandeered police cars, blowing through stop lights and flying over speed bumps. Although it was a warm spring day, the streets were nearly empty. Separatists described taking up sniper positions in an unfinished office building, only to find that two floors down their enemies had the same idea. The Ukrainian government declared Friday that it planned to surround and blockade this town, which is completely controlled by the separatists.
WORLD
April 25, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Christi Parsons and Don Lee
SEOUL - Halfway through a long-delayed visit to four allies in Asia, President Obama is struggling to sell a foreign policy strategy that seems under siege on multiple fronts. When he landed in Seoul on Friday, Obama had not locked down a key portion of a long-promised Pacific Rim free-trade deal, had made scant progress in forcing Russia to retreat on Ukraine, and had just seen his administration's Mideast peace efforts put on life support. The setbacks involved unrelated disputes thousands of miles apart, but together they dealt a harsh blow to the president's second-term foreign policy agenda, including its much-touted rebalancing of U.S. strategic interests to the Asia-Pacific region.
WORLD
March 2, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine -- Ukraine's acting president, Oleksandr Turchynov, fired his new navy commander on Sunday for “high treason” after the admiral pledged allegiance to pro-Russian forces in Crimea, a Ukrainian news agency reported. Earlier in the day, Adm. Denis Berezovsky appeared in public in Sevastopol in the company of Crimea's newly elected pro-Moscow premier, Sergei Aksenov, and pledged allegiance to his administration. “I, Denis Berezovsky, swear an oath of allegiance to the residents of the republic of Crimea,” Berezovsky said in televised remarks.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams, This post has been updated and corrected. See the notes below for details.
MOSCOW -- Ukraine's acting president said Tuesday that it would be at least two more days before an interim government is in place as further negotiations are needed to ensure that a genuine “coalition of national faith” agrees to see the divided country through to May 25 elections. Interim President Olexander Turchynov made the announcement to the parliament now dominated by opposition figures and defected members of fugitive ex-President Viktor Yanukovich's Party of Regions.
WORLD
April 25, 2014 | Kathleen Hennessey, Christi Parsons
The White House said Saturday that the world's leading industrialized nations had agreed to impose targeted sanctions on Russia as early as Monday in response to its actions toward neighboring Ukraine. "Leaders have agreed that there must be further sanctions on Russia for their actions," a senior Obama administration official said. "Each country will determine which targeted sanctions they will impose. These sanctions will be coordinated and complementary, but not necessarily identical.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - As President Obama warned of possible new U.S. sanctions against Russia, a senior Ukrainian official Thursday urged the West to move immediately to impose penalties against entire sectors of the Russian economy. Danylo Lubkivsky, Ukraine's deputy foreign minister, said the United States and Europe need to move beyond sanctions on individuals to the more far-reaching “sectoral” sanctions because Russia “has already crossed the red line.” With Russia sending more troops to its region bordering Ukraine, “we have to do it right now,” he said in an appearance at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington.
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