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December 1, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Ukraine hurtling toward independence, lawmakers from the Soviet republics have agreed in principle on their homelands' right to field their own armies, seemingly posing a threat to the world's largest fighting force, the Soviet army, Ukrainian officials said Saturday. Returning from talks in Moscow, Vasily V.
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NEWS
September 28, 2000 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mack, Vakh and Diana were once among the elite of the Soviet navy. They were trained to locate underwater mines, detect enemy frogmen and, according to some, kill without warning. That was a decade ago, and the country they served no longer exists. Today they still live at the Kazachya Bay Naval Base on the Black Sea, but they have a new job: helping cure children of their nightmares, phobias and bed-wetting. Call it military conversion, Ukrainian-style.
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NEWS
April 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried by territorial claims, political pressure and possible economic boycotts from its powerful neighbor Russia, Ukraine will demand international guarantees for its security as it gives up the nuclear arsenal inherited from the Soviet Union, Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk said Tuesday.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sailors based at this naval port, sprawled among five jagged bays of the Black Sea, walk the hilly streets in smart black uniforms. You have to look hard at the Cyrillic lettering on their hatbands to tell which of two rival navies they serve. The sailors themselves eye each other warily, especially at night. Every few weeks, a Ukrainian navy shore patrol arrests a Russian sailor and roughs him up, prompting retaliation by the Russian-dominated Black Sea Fleet.
NEWS
February 15, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Commonwealth of Independent States ceased to exist as a unified military bloc on Friday after Russia failed to dissuade Ukraine and two other republics from breaking away to establish their own separate armies. Through 10 hours of often heated, emotional discussions with other Commonwealth leaders, Ukraine's President Leonid Kravchuk remained staunch in his commitment to raise a Ukrainian army as a symbol and guarantor of his nation's emergence as an independent state.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tensions between the two largest republics of the former Soviet Union flared again Friday, when Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin threatened to take the Black Sea Fleet under his control if "anyone"--meaning Ukraine--attempts to change its status.
NEWS
April 21, 1992
Russian and Ukrainian officials plan five days of meetings in this seaside Ukrainian city starting Wednesday in one more attempt to resolve their differences over the future of the former Soviet Black Sea Fleet. With 345 surface ships, 28 submarines, 159 aircraft and 90,000 men, the Black Sea Fleet is roughly the same size as the British or French navy, and is a prize that both states would love to have.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | Associated Press
Russian and Ukrainian negotiators failed to show up for talks Wednesday on the disputed Black Sea Fleet, apparently because of political turmoil in Russia, the Russian news agency Itar-Tass reported. The two sides were scheduled to discuss their conflicting claims to the fleet, which has more than 300 ships.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia and Ukraine took a major step toward reconciliation on Saturday in their confrontation over who controls the Black Sea Fleet and how the former Soviet Union's massive armed forces should be divided up in general. Russian and Ukrainian officials, meeting for urgent negotiations in Kiev, agreed to set up a panel of military experts to resolve their disagreements and "pledged not to take any unilateral actions," according to a joint statement.
NEWS
January 17, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressed to decide the future of the former Soviet armed forces before 5,000 disgruntled officers meet in the Kremlin today, leaders of the Commonwealth of Independent States struggled Thursday night to hammer out a unified military policy but to little avail. Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin, who chaired the meeting at an estate in southwestern Moscow, announced at its conclusion: "Today, we agreed calmly, with mutual understanding, on all the issues we intended to resolve."
NEWS
July 20, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER; Sergei L. Loiko and Andrei V. Ostroukh of The Times' Moscow Bureau contributed to this report
One daily drill of soldiers in the new Georgian army is to launch rockets across the Gumista River at a three-story building by the Black Sea. Their aim is lousy, but after months of occasional hits, the windows are gone and the concrete walls look like Swiss cheese. Still, the strategic value of the site is intact--a deep underground seismic laboratory used by Russia's army to detect nuclear explosions in Southern Europe, the Middle East and Africa.
NEWS
June 18, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia and Ukraine agreed Thursday to split the Black Sea Fleet down the middle in hopes of finally ending the chronic disputes over its control that have riled sailors and set the two Slavic nations against each other. The agreement between Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and Ukrainian leader Leonid Kravchuk amounted to an admission that they cannot abide by their previous plan to share the fleet, once a jewel of the Soviet navy, for two years while they worked out its future.
NEWS
May 25, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 100 disputed warships of the former Soviet Black Sea Fleet hoisted the Russian naval ensign Monday as a quarrel over ownership of the armada again threatened relations between Moscow and Kiev. In defiance of an agreement between Russian and Ukrainian leaders, pro-Moscow officers raised the cross of St. Andrew--for centuries the emblem of the czarist navy--over dozens of support ships of the 380-vessel fleet.
NEWS
May 27, 1992 | Reuters
The Black Sea Fleet of the former Soviet Union is to be removed from joint control of the Commonwealth of Independent States and divided between Ukraine and Russia, the Commonwealth's top military commander said Tuesday. Marshal Yevgeny I. Shaposhnikov said bilateral talks between Russia and Ukraine will determine how to divide the fleet.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | ALEX SHPRINTSEN and MICHAEL PARKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After four months of political sparring, Russian and Ukrainian negotiators met here Wednesday to resolve the future of the Soviet Union's powerful Black Sea Fleet, an issue that has embittered relations between the two former Soviet republics and consequently jeopardized the whole Commonwealth of Independent States. Air Marshal Yevgeny I.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried by territorial claims, political pressure and possible economic boycotts from its powerful neighbor Russia, Ukraine will demand international guarantees for its security as it gives up the nuclear arsenal inherited from the Soviet Union, Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk said Tuesday.
NEWS
April 28, 1992
Negotiators for Russia and Ukraine on Wednesday will try again in this port city to decide the fate of the former Soviet Union's Black Sea Fleet. At issue is one of the largest naval forces in Europe, boasting 345 ships as well as submarines and aircraft. Previous agreements between Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and Ukrainian President Leonid M. Kravchuk on dividing the fleet have repeatedly fallen apart.
NEWS
April 21, 1992
Russian and Ukrainian officials plan five days of meetings in this seaside Ukrainian city starting Wednesday in one more attempt to resolve their differences over the future of the former Soviet Black Sea Fleet. With 345 surface ships, 28 submarines, 159 aircraft and 90,000 men, the Black Sea Fleet is roughly the same size as the British or French navy, and is a prize that both states would love to have.
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