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NEWS
March 29, 1992 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Which came first, the chocolate chicken or the colored egg? Hardly a subject of international importance--unless the eggs are pysanky. A pysanka is an intricately painted egg, filled with Ukrainian tradition. For centuries Ukrainians have designed the eggs--using scalpel-like tools and a keen eye--to represent aspects of life. The pysanky are traditionally blessed on Easter morning and shared on special occasions--weddings, the birth of a child, when friends visit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1996 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's in a name? In the case of the Leontovych String Quartet, one hopes not too much: The classical string ensemble is named for Nicola Leontovych, a 19th century composer best known for choral arrangements of folk music. "The name was not chosen by the members of the quartet," assured first violinist Yuri Mazurkevich in a recent phone interview from his home in Boston. "The name was given to the quartet by the Minister of Culture in the Ukraine. It was not a matter of choice at all.
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NEWS
November 30, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along with the other millions of victims claimed by Soviet rule in the Ukraine was one liquidated in the 1930s but now restored to its rightful place. It is the letter g , written in Ukrainian like a Greek gamma , with an upswinging hook on the right side of the horizontal stroke.
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | ANGELA CHARLTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Broken Hand and his wife, Butterfly, are preparing their feathered headgear and practicing Sioux dances for the "gathering of the tribes" in late June. The couple, otherwise known as Sergei and Viktoria Tsyganyuk, will leave their apartment in eastern Ukraine, board a Soviet-made train and pitch their tent at the festival--near St. Petersburg, Russia.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing a week of religious and national renewal in the Ukraine, returning Catholic Cardinal Myroslav Lubachivsky on Sunday conducted a Byzantine Mass in a Lvov cathedral for the first time in half a century. Inside the freshly gilded, exuberantly baroque Cathedral of St. George, the seat of his church, Lubachivsky raised his voice in triumph through the prayers and incense.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If salo had wings, it would fly to the heavens. --Ukrainian proverb * Slabs of creamy white fat trimmed with golden pigskin covered Maria Olexiev's counter at the farmers market. "How much for the salo ?" asked a middle-aged man in a stylish jacket. "Just 150,000," said Olexiev, expertly slicing off a sliver for him to sample. The price in Ukraine's inflation-ravaged currency, the karbovanet , was about 50 cents a pound. "It's wonderful!"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1996 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What's in a name? In the case of the Leontovych String Quartet, one hopes not too much: The classical string ensemble is named for Nicola Leontovych, a 19th century composer best known for choral arrangements of folk music. "The name was not chosen by the members of the quartet," assured first violinist Yuri Mazurkevich in a recent phone interview from his home in Boston. "The name was given to the quartet by the Minister of Culture in the Ukraine. It was not a matter of choice at all.
NEWS
May 1, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hundreds of years as the brunt of Russian jokes and the subject of countless decrees from whatever czar or general secretary was sitting in the Kremlin, Ukrainians are forging a new relationship with Moscow--one of equals, whether Russia likes it or not. "Russians love to refer to the relations between Russia and Ukraine as the relations of an older brother and a younger brother," said Anatoly Z. Moskalenko, a prominent Ukrainian historian and journalist.
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | ANGELA CHARLTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Broken Hand and his wife, Butterfly, are preparing their feathered headgear and practicing Sioux dances for the "gathering of the tribes" in late June. The couple, otherwise known as Sergei and Viktoria Tsyganyuk, will leave their apartment in eastern Ukraine, board a Soviet-made train and pitch their tent at the festival--near St. Petersburg, Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2009 | Associated Press
Ukraine's Culture Ministry says it has banned Sacha Baron Cohen's new movie "Bruno" because it is immoral. The movie is centered around the adventures of a flamboyant gay fashion journalist from Austria. The ministry said this week that Baron Cohen's depictions of sexual organs, homosexual intercourse and language are obscene and improper. Some Austrian officials have spoken out against the film but have not taken any action against it. Baron Cohen's previous movie, "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan," was banned in Kazakhstan and Russia.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If salo had wings, it would fly to the heavens. --Ukrainian proverb * Slabs of creamy white fat trimmed with golden pigskin covered Maria Olexiev's counter at the farmers market. "How much for the salo ?" asked a middle-aged man in a stylish jacket. "Just 150,000," said Olexiev, expertly slicing off a sliver for him to sample. The price in Ukraine's inflation-ravaged currency, the karbovanet , was about 50 cents a pound. "It's wonderful!"
NEWS
May 1, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hundreds of years as the brunt of Russian jokes and the subject of countless decrees from whatever czar or general secretary was sitting in the Kremlin, Ukrainians are forging a new relationship with Moscow--one of equals, whether Russia likes it or not. "Russians love to refer to the relations between Russia and Ukraine as the relations of an older brother and a younger brother," said Anatoly Z. Moskalenko, a prominent Ukrainian historian and journalist.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Which came first, the chocolate chicken or the colored egg? Hardly a subject of international importance--unless the eggs are pysanky. A pysanka is an intricately painted egg, filled with Ukrainian tradition. For centuries Ukrainians have designed the eggs--using scalpel-like tools and a keen eye--to represent aspects of life. The pysanky are traditionally blessed on Easter morning and shared on special occasions--weddings, the birth of a child, when friends visit.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along with the other millions of victims claimed by Soviet rule in the Ukraine was one liquidated in the 1930s but now restored to its rightful place. It is the letter g , written in Ukrainian like a Greek gamma , with an upswinging hook on the right side of the horizontal stroke.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing a week of religious and national renewal in the Ukraine, returning Catholic Cardinal Myroslav Lubachivsky on Sunday conducted a Byzantine Mass in a Lvov cathedral for the first time in half a century. Inside the freshly gilded, exuberantly baroque Cathedral of St. George, the seat of his church, Lubachivsky raised his voice in triumph through the prayers and incense.
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