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NEWS
November 21, 1992 | CHRYSTYNA LAPYCHAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A severe fuel shortage has crippled the provision of basic goods and services throughout Ukraine as the government of this fledgling country grapples with erratic deliveries of oil from its neighbor and sole supplier, Russia. About 40,000 Kiev residents could not buy bread earlier this week after the city's transport service failed to deliver 11 1/2 tons of bread to stores because of the fuel shortage.
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NEWS
April 9, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Mikhalevich was a hard-working coal miner humiliated by his inability to feed his family; Pavlo Lazarenko was a masterful politician who became Ukraine's prime minister at 43. The two men, 10 years and a world apart, never crossed paths. Mikhalevich spent his working life half a mile underground, hacking coal from the earth; Lazarenko lived in a mansion outside Kiev, spruced up with half a million dollars that Ukrainian prosecutors allege he stole from the government.
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BUSINESS
December 29, 1993 | MARY MYCIO
ISSUE: A drastic energy shortage is putting a stranglehold on the desperately weak Ukrainian economy and forcing the government to plunge its populace into darkness. Street lights go out at 9 p.m., buildings go unheated and television viewing for Ukraine's 52 million citizens is restricted to six hours a day. BACKGROUND: Ukraine depends on Russia for nearly all its oil and most of its natural gas.
NEWS
July 24, 1998 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fresh from a helicopter tour of the site of the world's worst nuclear accident and a stroll through the ghost town abandoned in its wake, Vice President Al Gore on Thursday used the images of Chernobyl's devastation to urge India and Pakistan to renounce a new round of nuclear competition. "Today, for the first time, I saw Chernobyl," Gore said after making the highest-level visit here of any U.S. official.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Volodymyr Volkov counts his wife's monthly wage in bags of mushrooms. "She earns three of these," he said, pointing to the two-pound bags of creamy white champignons he was selling Sunday at Kiev's Bessarabian Market. Volkov's wife, a government office worker, isn't the only one who couldn't afford them. "If you're living on your salary, don't bother," he told a matron who groused at the price of a bag, equal to about $4. Still, it took just 10 minutes for Volkov to sell four bags of mushrooms.
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Mikhalevich was a hard-working coal miner humiliated by his inability to feed his family; Pavlo Lazarenko was a masterful politician who became Ukraine's prime minister at 43. The two men, 10 years and a world apart, never crossed paths. Mikhalevich spent his working life half a mile underground, hacking coal from the earth; Lazarenko lived in a mansion outside Kiev, spruced up with half a million dollars that Ukrainian prosecutors allege he stole from the government.
NEWS
September 24, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new Ukrainian government reached a preliminary accord Friday with the International Monetary Fund to launch market reforms in one of the weakest and most Communist economies of the former Soviet Union. The handshake agreement was the first clear sign that President Leonid Kuchma, who took office two months ago, is ready to move ahead with a promised economic overhaul in return for financial backing from the West.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wrenching themselves from Moscow's orbit, Ukrainians voted overwhelmingly for independence, and their new president said Monday that the former Soviet republics, and not the Kremlin, should now take collective command of the country's nuclear arsenal. "A new Ukraine has been born. A great historical event has occurred which will not only change the history of the Ukraine but the history of the world," declared Leonid M. Kravchuk, the wily ex-Communist who became his republic's president-elect.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hottest restaurant here these days is a retro-chic diner that sports "Miami Vice" pink walls, halogen lighting and oversized Marilyn Monroe portraits with the idol's lips outlined in fuchsia neon. The waitresses wear pastel suspenders and the itsy-bitsy black spandex skirts that seem to define the female dress code in every go-go economy of the former East Bloc. "It looks just like the West," said a young American admiring the posh crowd at the hard-currency-only Studio eatery.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin lands here today with a long-coveted invitation to the World's Most Important Countries Club, marking a new phase in Russia's bumpy rapprochement with the West. For the first time, Yeltsin does not come seeking international aid. Rather, he aims to show the West that Russia, however troubled, is no longer a charity case.
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | From Reuters
Ukrainian President Leonid D. Kuchma fired Prime Minister Yevhen Marchuk on Monday, blaming him for the former Soviet republic's economic crisis. "Premier Yevhen Marchuk did not effectively carry out his duties in running the government," Kuchma's press office said in a statement. "Rather than fulfilling his day-to-day duties, he has most recently been using all his energy to promote his own political image."
NEWS
December 11, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeing signs of Christmas all around this economic hub of the Pacific has made Mikhail Yavtushenko wistful for a Ukrainian-style Noel, with family gathered around a table laden with roast duck stuffed with apples, beef ribs and dried prunes. "I dream of it every night," said the 49-year-old lifelong seaman with piercing blue eyes and a handlebar mustache. "But I do not know when I will be getting home."
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hottest restaurant here these days is a retro-chic diner that sports "Miami Vice" pink walls, halogen lighting and oversized Marilyn Monroe portraits with the idol's lips outlined in fuchsia neon. The waitresses wear pastel suspenders and the itsy-bitsy black spandex skirts that seem to define the female dress code in every go-go economy of the former East Bloc. "It looks just like the West," said a young American admiring the posh crowd at the hard-currency-only Studio eatery.
NEWS
September 24, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new Ukrainian government reached a preliminary accord Friday with the International Monetary Fund to launch market reforms in one of the weakest and most Communist economies of the former Soviet Union. The handshake agreement was the first clear sign that President Leonid Kuchma, who took office two months ago, is ready to move ahead with a promised economic overhaul in return for financial backing from the West.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With one hand on a 16th-Century Bible and the other on Ukraine's 1991 Declaration of Independence, Leonid Kuchma was sworn in Tuesday as this nation's second president. It was the first peaceful transfer of executive power in Ukraine's turbulent modern history. But even as he took over from outgoing rival Leonid Kravchuk, Kuchma called for "essential changes in Ukraine's economic and political course" to avert economic disaster.
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | MARY MYCIO and SONNI EFRON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President-elect Leonid Kuchma will try to boost this nation's moribund economy by reviving its military industries and teaming up with Russia to grab a bigger share of the arms export market, Ukrainian lawmakers said Tuesday.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Prime Minister Vitold Fokin, under fire for advocating that Ukrainians return to a state-run economy, tendered his resignation Wednesday, but the fate of his ultraconservative economic plan remained unclear. A few hundred of Fokin's supporters, holding signs declaring "No to Capitalism," stood outside the Parliament building in a downpour to protest criticism of the prime minister, whose resignation offer came as a surprise.
NEWS
February 3, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After 13 months of dithering, Ukraine's government on Tuesday presented its hard-line Parliament with a make-or-break reform program to lift the country out of post-Soviet economic chaos. Outlining his controversial plans before parliamentary critics, many of whom are already demanding an end to economic reform, Economics Minister Viktor Pynzenik said his one-year austerity plan is designed to cut the spiral of hyper-inflation and industrial decline.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Volodymyr Volkov counts his wife's monthly wage in bags of mushrooms. "She earns three of these," he said, pointing to the two-pound bags of creamy white champignons he was selling Sunday at Kiev's Bessarabian Market. Volkov's wife, a government office worker, isn't the only one who couldn't afford them. "If you're living on your salary, don't bother," he told a matron who groused at the price of a bag, equal to about $4. Still, it took just 10 minutes for Volkov to sell four bags of mushrooms.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin lands here today with a long-coveted invitation to the World's Most Important Countries Club, marking a new phase in Russia's bumpy rapprochement with the West. For the first time, Yeltsin does not come seeking international aid. Rather, he aims to show the West that Russia, however troubled, is no longer a charity case.
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