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Ukraine Elections

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NEWS
November 22, 1994 | Reuters
Weekend parliamentary by-elections in Ukraine filled just nine of 56 vacant seats as voters stayed away in droves, election officials said Monday. They said a second round will be held in two weeks for four seats where turnout was more than 50% Sunday, but no candidate won an overall majority. Elections for the remaining 43 seats will be put off indefinitely. This was the third round of parliamentary voting since March in addition to two rounds of presidential elections.
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WORLD
February 7, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
Sinking into irrelevance as rival politicians scrapped to take his place, Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko lobbed a grenade into the final days of the campaign: He named a controversial anti-Soviet nationalist assassinated by the KGB half a century ago a "Hero of Ukraine." Here in Ukraine's most avidly Western-leaning, anti-Russian city, news that the rare honor had been bestowed on Stepan Bandera was met with jubilation. Disgust and dismay swept the Russian-speaking provinces, where Bandera is remembered as a Nazi collaborator.
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NEWS
June 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Final returns in Ukraine's presidential election showed a nation polarized between the pro-Russian east, which supported former Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma, and the more nationalist west, which supported President Leonid Kravchuk. The two will face a July runoff. Kravchuk had 38% of the vote in Sunday's balloting, while Kuchma finished second in the seven-man race with 31%.
WORLD
October 2, 2007 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Warning that falsification of parliamentary election results would be punished, President Viktor Yushchenko on Monday ordered a criminal inquiry into delayed vote counting in regions that are strongholds of his longtime rival, Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich. The prime minister, for his part, accused parties associated with the president of prematurely claiming victory based on exit polls rather than waiting for the ballots cast in Sunday's election to be counted.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
All their careers, California political consultants Sal Russo and Tony Marsh have worked for candidates who have extolled freedom and warned voters not to trust the Soviet empire. But it was like a bolt out of the blue when they recently were invited to the Ukraine to help pitch a similar message. Now, they are celebrating one of their strangest and most satisfying election victories ever--the landslide vote in the Ukraine to declare independence from Moscow and the Soviet Union.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a historic but wildly confusing exercise in democracy, Ukrainians head for the polls today to try to elect their first post-Communist Parliament. The contest could bring an end to the chronic political chaos that has plagued and impoverished this new nation of 52 million. Or it could doom a still-nuclear country the size of France to more infighting, corruption and political paralysis, deeper regional rifts, and even disintegration.
NEWS
June 27, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ukrainians voted in large numbers Sunday in a presidential election that boiled down to a referendum on whether post-Soviet Europe's most disastrous peacetime economy should remain at arm's length from its former masters in Moscow. Pre-election polls indicated that President Leonid Kravchuk, who led Ukraine to independence 2 1/2 years ago, is ahead in the seven-man field but will get fewer than half the votes.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Volodymyr Volkov counts his wife's monthly wage in bags of mushrooms. "She earns three of these," he said, pointing to the two-pound bags of creamy white champignons he was selling Sunday at Kiev's Bessarabian Market. Volkov's wife, a government office worker, isn't the only one who couldn't afford them. "If you're living on your salary, don't bother," he told a matron who groused at the price of a bag, equal to about $4. Still, it took just 10 minutes for Volkov to sell four bags of mushrooms.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Both reformers and Communists claimed victory Monday in Ukraine's parliamentary elections as unofficial returns from weekend runoffs trickled into the capital. But with 330 of the legislature's 450 seats filled by two weeks of voting, neither the right nor the left had won a clear majority.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was only noon, but this was the third campaign stop of the day, and Vyacheslav Chornovil's voice, damaged by 15 years in labor camps and Siberian exile, had been reduced to a croaking whisper. Wearing a blue suit, he stood amid the drill pressers at the Fiolent Radio Parts Factory, addressing 80 or so workers clad in greasy overalls. His broad forehead, accentuated by a receding hairline, glistened with sweat.
WORLD
November 28, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Parliament on Saturday boosted the opposition's challenge of a presidential runoff election, saying the results handing victory to Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich were invalid because of fraud. The nonbinding resolution, which also expressed no confidence in the Central Election Commission, provided important moral and political backing to a call by opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko for repeat balloting in December.
WORLD
November 23, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A political crisis erupted here Monday as official results showed Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich winning a bitterly contested presidential election, while opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko brought supporters into the streets to press his own claim of victory. Ukrainian security forces threatened a crackdown as tens of thousands of protesters massed in central Kiev chanting the name of the pro-Western opposition leader. Foreign observers -- including President Bush's personal envoy, Sen.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Voters have given Ukrainian President Leonid D. Kuchma a strong mandate to expand his controls over an unruly parliament, but the vote alone does not ensure him a decisive victory in his power struggle with legislators. During a weekend referendum, voters overwhelmingly approved four Kuchma proposals that would alter parliament. However, the proposals still require approval of parliament itself, and if it is withheld, a deep political crisis could ensue.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Leonid D. Kuchma won a second term Sunday with a convincing victory over a Communist who frightened many voters with his calls to turn back to the Soviet era. With more than 97% of the votes counted in the runoff election, Kuchma won 56% to Communist Party chief Petro Simonenko's 38%, the Central Elections Commission reported. Victory had been expected for Kuchma, despite unhappiness with his failure to rescue the economy or crack down on corruption.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Ukrainian President Leonid D. Kuchma looked well placed to hang on to his job for another five years after establishing an early election lead over Communist Party chief Petro Simonenko. Initial returns from the voting, billed as a choice between continued pro-market reforms and a return to the Soviet past, showed Kuchma leading comfortably but unlikely to win outright in the first round. Returns based on 17% of the ballots cast showed Kuchma with 37.05%, ahead of Simonenko's 22.02%.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With President Leonid D. Kuchma facing 14 challengers, Ukraine's third presidential race in eight years of independence was bound to heat up in the weeks before the Oct. 31 election. After months of mudslinging, pundits wondered what heavy artillery the candidates were reserving for the final showdown of this country's nastiest campaign.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wrenching themselves from Moscow's orbit, Ukrainians voted overwhelmingly for independence, and their new president said Monday that the former Soviet republics, and not the Kremlin, should now take collective command of the country's nuclear arsenal. "A new Ukraine has been born. A great historical event has occurred which will not only change the history of the Ukraine but the history of the world," declared Leonid M. Kravchuk, the wily ex-Communist who became his republic's president-elect.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Leonid D. Kuchma won a second term Sunday with a convincing victory over a Communist who frightened many voters with his calls to turn back to the Soviet era. With more than 97% of the votes counted in the runoff election, Kuchma won 56% to Communist Party chief Petro Simonenko's 38%, the Central Elections Commission reported. Victory had been expected for Kuchma, despite unhappiness with his failure to rescue the economy or crack down on corruption.
NEWS
October 4, 1999 | From Associated Press
Ukraine's presidential campaign turned violent when assailants hurled two grenades at an election rally, injuring a top contender and more than 30 other people, police said Sunday. The attack Saturday night on lawmaker Natalia Vitrenko, a radical leftist, was the most serious outburst of violence in the run-up to the Oct. 31 presidential ballot in the former Soviet republic.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | Associated Press
A strengthened Communist Party will lead the way in a new Ukrainian parliament crowded with foes of President Leonid D. Kuchma, preliminary election results indicated Tuesday. The Communists tapped into widespread economic discontent in the former Soviet republic. Other leftists and more moderate opponents of the president also made gains in the parliament, known as the Verkhovna Rada.
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