Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUkraine Elections
IN THE NEWS

Ukraine Elections

NEWS
June 28, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Divided sharply over whether to look toward Europe or Russia, voters in this nation's presidential election put incumbent Leonid Kravchuk ahead in the west, favored former Prime Minister Leonid Kuchma in the east and sent them into a two-man runoff next month. Official returns Monday from 16 of 27 regions gave Kuchma 36% of the votes in Sunday's election to 30% for Kravchuk, followed by five other candidates. But that count was somewhat weighted toward Kuchma's expected strongholds.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 27, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ukrainians voted in large numbers Sunday in a presidential election that boiled down to a referendum on whether post-Soviet Europe's most disastrous peacetime economy should remain at arm's length from its former masters in Moscow. Pre-election polls indicated that President Leonid Kravchuk, who led Ukraine to independence 2 1/2 years ago, is ahead in the seven-man field but will get fewer than half the votes.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A furious voice rang out from the packed auditorium, interrupting the speaker. "Whose fault is it that the Soviet Union collapsed?" Leonid Kuchma, President Leonid Kravchuk's main challenger to lead this nuclear-armed nation, peered into the crowd. "I was against that uncivilized divorce," said the former rocket builder and ex-premier, referring to the breakup of the 15 Soviet republics three years ago. "It cut through economic ties like through living flesh."
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Both reformers and Communists claimed victory Monday in Ukraine's parliamentary elections as unofficial returns from weekend runoffs trickled into the capital. But with 330 of the legislature's 450 seats filled by two weeks of voting, neither the right nor the left had won a clear majority.
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Disillusioned by this nation's economic tailspin, pro-Russian residents of eastern Ukraine and Crimea have voted overwhelmingly for more autonomy from Kiev, according to preliminary results released Monday. Local ballot initiatives making Russian as well as Ukrainian an official language passed easily Sunday in two regions of Russophone eastern Ukraine. Also, a huge majority of voters in depressed industrial Donetsk and Lugansk favored closer economic ties with Russia.
NEWS
March 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
Angered by an economy that's going nowhere fast, Ukrainians voted in large numbers Sunday to replace the Communist-dominated Parliament that has blocked reforms and opposes nuclear disarmament. Crimea and parts of eastern Ukraine ignored a presidential order by holding referendums on closer ties with Russia. The brisk turnout for parliamentary elections, Ukraine's first since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, defied predictions of voter apathy.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a chilly, darkened schoolhouse that bears witness to the energy crisis that is sapping Ukraine's economic vitality, Environment Minister Yuri Kostenko looks as worn as his old gray overcoat. "Had more attention been paid to Ukraine's energy supplies two or three years ago, then our economy would not be in such a terrible state today," the 42-year-old physical chemist said.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a historic but wildly confusing exercise in democracy, Ukrainians head for the polls today to try to elect their first post-Communist Parliament. The contest could bring an end to the chronic political chaos that has plagued and impoverished this new nation of 52 million. Or it could doom a still-nuclear country the size of France to more infighting, corruption and political paralysis, deeper regional rifts, and even disintegration.
NEWS
March 22, 1994
Ukrainians will go to the polls Sunday for their first elections since independence from the Soviet Union in 1991. More than 3,600 candidates will contest 450 seats in the Rada, Ukraine's Parliament.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The man on whom the Clinton Administration has pinned its hopes for Ukrainian nuclear disarmament may look like a lame duck when he arrives in Washington for an official visit Thursday. But President Leonid Kravchuk isn't nicknamed "the wily fox" for nothing.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|