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Ukraine Foreign Policy

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NEWS
December 22, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The four republics that hold the Soviet Union's strategic nuclear arms declared their intention Saturday to place the weapons under joint control and pledged that they will not launch a first strike. But they still must agree on who will have the authority to order the weapons' use in the event of war. Russian Federation President Boris N.
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NEWS
December 22, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The four republics that hold the Soviet Union's strategic nuclear arms declared their intention Saturday to place the weapons under joint control and pledged that they will not launch a first strike. But they still must agree on who will have the authority to order the weapons' use in the event of war. Russian Federation President Boris N.
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NEWS
December 7, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cotton to make flags for the free Ukraine will have to come from someplace else. None is grown here. To administer the world's newest country, the government can muster a total of 8,900 Kiev-based civil servants. They now must take charge of everything from mail delivery to running nuclear power plants and a fledgling navy. As a newly independent country, Ukraine naturally wants its own currency. But it will have to have it printed in Canada because the republic lacks the proper presses.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cotton to make flags for the free Ukraine will have to come from someplace else. None is grown here. To administer the world's newest country, the government can muster a total of 8,900 Kiev-based civil servants. They now must take charge of everything from mail delivery to running nuclear power plants and a fledgling navy. As a newly independent country, Ukraine naturally wants its own currency. But it will have to have it printed in Canada because the republic lacks the proper presses.
WORLD
September 15, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
They are at each other's throats again, this country's political lions: the president whose face is pocked from the poison that didn't quite kill him four years ago, and the prime minister with the golden braid who once fought alongside him in the name of democracy. The president's office now calls Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko a traitor who refuses to speak out against Moscow. She shoots back that President Viktor Yushchenko is a loose cannon who has antagonized Russia to the point of endangering Ukraine.
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