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NEWS
November 30, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along with the other millions of victims claimed by Soviet rule in the Ukraine was one liquidated in the 1930s but now restored to its rightful place. It is the letter g , written in Ukrainian like a Greek gamma , with an upswinging hook on the right side of the horizontal stroke.
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NEWS
December 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One offended critic called it the "Chicken Kiev" speech, and it left a bitterness some Ukrainians could still taste as Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Wednesday spelled out American intentions toward their new country. As recently as one month ago, radical Ukrainian lawmaker Ivan Zayets recalled, "We were saying, 'We will be autonomous.' But America was still telling us, 'No, you won't, you'll be in the Soviet Union.'
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NEWS
December 3, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wrenching themselves from Moscow's orbit, Ukrainians voted overwhelmingly for independence, and their new president said Monday that the former Soviet republics, and not the Kremlin, should now take collective command of the country's nuclear arsenal. "A new Ukraine has been born. A great historical event has occurred which will not only change the history of the Ukraine but the history of the world," declared Leonid M. Kravchuk, the wily ex-Communist who became his republic's president-elect.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Ukrainians voted overwhelmingly for independence from the Soviet Union, breaking with decades of failed socialism and centuries of Russian domination, the priority for their newborn nation-state will be to affirm many of the political, economic and security ties it now has with its neighbors, primarily with the Russian Federation. Ukrainian President-elect Leonid M.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One offended critic called it the "Chicken Kiev" speech, and it left a bitterness some Ukrainians could still taste as Secretary of State James A. Baker III on Wednesday spelled out American intentions toward their new country. As recently as one month ago, radical Ukrainian lawmaker Ivan Zayets recalled, "We were saying, 'We will be autonomous.' But America was still telling us, 'No, you won't, you'll be in the Soviet Union.'
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Could they go it alone? As more and more Soviet republics move to declare independence from Moscow, both Western policy-makers and Soviet officials have begun concentrating on an issue that they never had to think about before: Would independent republics be economically and politically viable? To some, the question has an odd ring.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Ukrainians voted overwhelmingly for independence from the Soviet Union, breaking with decades of failed socialism and centuries of Russian domination, the priority for their newborn nation-state will be to affirm many of the political, economic and security ties it now has with its neighbors, primarily with the Russian Federation. Ukrainian President-elect Leonid M.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Ukraine hurtling toward independence, lawmakers from the Soviet republics have agreed in principle on their homelands' right to field their own armies, seemingly posing a threat to the world's largest fighting force, the Soviet army, Ukrainian officials said Saturday. Returning from talks in Moscow, Vasily V.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Friday sought to minimize the danger of a rupture in relations with Moscow over his Administration's planned recognition of an independent Ukraine. "We're all right," Bush insisted during a short shopping trip from his weekend retreat at Camp David, Md. "There's not going to be a big breach here." The attempt by Bush to play down the potential for a U.S.-Soviet rift came a day after Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Defense Minister Yevgeny I. Shaposhnikov, moving to allay Western jitters triggered by the Ukraine's claims to the nuclear weapons based on its territory, declared Saturday that all strategic arms will remain tightly under the Kremlin's control. To avoid further political wrangling over the armed forces, Shaposhnikov called on the republics of the collapsing Soviet Union to sign a treaty creating a "defense union of sovereign states."
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wrenching themselves from Moscow's orbit, Ukrainians voted overwhelmingly for independence, and their new president said Monday that the former Soviet republics, and not the Kremlin, should now take collective command of the country's nuclear arsenal. "A new Ukraine has been born. A great historical event has occurred which will not only change the history of the Ukraine but the history of the world," declared Leonid M. Kravchuk, the wily ex-Communist who became his republic's president-elect.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Ukraine hurtling toward independence, lawmakers from the Soviet republics have agreed in principle on their homelands' right to field their own armies, seemingly posing a threat to the world's largest fighting force, the Soviet army, Ukrainian officials said Saturday. Returning from talks in Moscow, Vasily V.
MAGAZINE
December 1, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, Denise Hamilton is a Times staff writer
A chill clings to Lvov's cobblestone streets, dispelling the milky warmth cast by the late-afternoon sun. Men hurry home, pushing carts piled high with sacks of potatoes. Women pickle the last of the summer vegetables and spoon homemade raspberry jam into jars. * But autumn has brought a new ritual to this picturesque western Ukrainian city 80 miles from the Polish border. In the town square, where V. I. Lenin's statue was recently torn down by an angry crowd, independence fever has broken out.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Friday sought to minimize the danger of a rupture in relations with Moscow over his Administration's planned recognition of an independent Ukraine. "We're all right," Bush insisted during a short shopping trip from his weekend retreat at Camp David, Md. "There's not going to be a big breach here." The attempt by Bush to play down the potential for a U.S.-Soviet rift came a day after Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along with the other millions of victims claimed by Soviet rule in the Ukraine was one liquidated in the 1930s but now restored to its rightful place. It is the letter g , written in Ukrainian like a Greek gamma , with an upswinging hook on the right side of the horizontal stroke.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The readiness of the United States and its European allies to recognize Ukrainian independence brings to a halt any meaningful effort to reconstitute the Soviet Union as a single state, ending an era that shaped much of the 20th Century but providing no clear vision for the future.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an accelerating rush toward independence from the crumbling Soviet Union, Ukrainians have discovered a nuclear bargaining chip in their arsenal of arguments for freedom. There are 200 intercontinental ballistic missiles in the Ukraine, a senior army officer disclosed Wednesday.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The readiness of the United States and its European allies to recognize Ukrainian independence brings to a halt any meaningful effort to reconstitute the Soviet Union as a single state, ending an era that shaped much of the 20th Century but providing no clear vision for the future.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ukrainians on Thursday warmly welcomed Washington's new readiness to recognize the statehood of their homeland, but the Kremlin reacted coolly to the news that the Bush Administration seems to be prepared to support the disintegration of the Soviet Union. "What has been shattered cannot be glued back together, and it is senseless to try," said Victor Burlakov, a leader of the Ukrainian grass-roots nationalist movement Rukh.
NEWS
November 28, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States now plans to offer diplomatic recognition to the soon-to-be independent Ukraine after President Bush and his senior advisers concluded that the Administration should no longer resist the tide of Soviet disintegration, U.S. officials said Wednesday. The decision, reached in a top-level White House meeting Tuesday, marks a significant departure in policy for an Administration that had long sought to prop up the central government in Moscow. "The handwriting is on the wall," a U.
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