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July 21, 1995 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Officials of the second-largest Ukrainian city shut off all running water Thursday to try draining a flooded sewage system and appealed to residents to leave town, if they can. "The bacterial danger is real," Mayor Yevhen Kusharov warned television viewers. "Please, take a vacation for a while, take your children to visit their grandparents." The flooding began June 29 when a two-hour cloudburst dumped more than an inch of rain on this city in eastern Ukraine.
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NEWS
July 21, 1995 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Officials of the second-largest Ukrainian city shut off all running water Thursday to try draining a flooded sewage system and appealed to residents to leave town, if they can. "The bacterial danger is real," Mayor Yevhen Kusharov warned television viewers. "Please, take a vacation for a while, take your children to visit their grandparents." The flooding began June 29 when a two-hour cloudburst dumped more than an inch of rain on this city in eastern Ukraine.
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NEWS
April 27, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine years after the world's worst nuclear accident, scientists marked the grim anniversary Wednesday by disclosing that their gravest fears about radiation risks have become reality. When an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power station sent a radioactive cloud across Ukraine, Russia and much of Europe on April 26, 1986, the disaster turned those nations into laboratories and the populations into guinea pigs.
NEWS
April 27, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine years after the world's worst nuclear accident, scientists marked the grim anniversary Wednesday by disclosing that their gravest fears about radiation risks have become reality. When an explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power station sent a radioactive cloud across Ukraine, Russia and much of Europe on April 26, 1986, the disaster turned those nations into laboratories and the populations into guinea pigs.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | From Reuters
Fourteen years after the world's worst nuclear disaster, the Chernobyl power plant is still killing people, Ukraine's Health Ministry said Friday. About 3.5 million people, more than a third of them children, have fallen ill as a result of the contamination, while the incidence of some cancers is 10 times the national average. "The health of people affected by the Chernobyl accident is getting worse and worse every year," Deputy Health Minister Olha Bobyleva told a news conference.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ukrainian parliamentary commission, concluding a sweeping probe of the Chernobyl disaster, has accused Communist leaders at the time, including Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, of a massive criminal cover-up that led to thousands of deaths. Faced with the worst accident in the history of nuclear power, Soviet authorities in April, 1986, reacted with "a total lie, falsehoods, cover-up and concealment," the commission chairman, Volodymyr Yavorivsky, said.
NEWS
December 30, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With much of Moscow down with the flu, President Boris N. Yeltsin returned to the Kremlin on Friday after two months of treatment for heart disease and stepped out in the snow to talk politics with passersby. Meeting with ordinary citizens for the first time since falling ill, Yeltsin looked vigorous and vowed again to defend his post-Soviet reforms from the Communist-led parliament elected Dec. 17. "We won't give anyone an opportunity to move backward," he said.
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