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NEWS
March 2, 1997 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the oldest and largest living things in the land, it was probably an acorn when Genghis Khan's descendants sacked Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, in the 13th century. Four hundred years later, Cossacks gathered under its boughs before battle. But after 700 years on Earth, the mighty Zaporizhian Oak is dying. "It's not completely dead yet," says grizzled Cossack watchman Boris Stupachenko, pointing to the sole living branch near the top of the 120-foot-tall tree.
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NEWS
March 2, 1997 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the oldest and largest living things in the land, it was probably an acorn when Genghis Khan's descendants sacked Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, in the 13th century. Four hundred years later, Cossacks gathered under its boughs before battle. But after 700 years on Earth, the mighty Zaporizhian Oak is dying. "It's not completely dead yet," says grizzled Cossack watchman Boris Stupachenko, pointing to the sole living branch near the top of the 120-foot-tall tree.
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NEWS
October 1, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 32 pupils in Mrs. Sidneva's third-grade class listened with rapt attention Monday as she described how Nazi soldiers shot more than 30,000 people in two days 50 years ago in a wooded area on the edge of Kiev. "The Nazis hated all of us--the Ukrainians, the Russians and the Byelorussians--but who did they hate the most?" Inna M. Sidneva asked the 8- and 9-year-olds sitting erect at their desks. Several hands shot up, and the teacher motioned to a boy sitting in the front row.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years after the Nazis slaughtered tens of thousands of people, mostly Jews, in a ravine outside Kiev, a Ukrainian leader stood at Babi Yar and vowed that such an atrocity must never happen again. "Anti-Semitism still finds in some places its speakers, but they will have to know they will get no support on Ukrainian lands," Leonid Kravchuk, the president of the Ukrainian Parliament, told a crowd of about 10,000 who gathered on a chilly autumn evening to honor those killed.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years after the Nazis slaughtered tens of thousands of people, mostly Jews, in a ravine outside Kiev, a Ukrainian leader stood at Babi Yar and vowed that such an atrocity must never happen again. "Anti-Semitism still finds in some places its speakers, but they will have to know they will get no support on Ukrainian lands," Leonid Kravchuk, the president of the Ukrainian Parliament, told a crowd of about 10,000 who gathered on a chilly autumn evening to honor those killed.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Attila the Hun is back. After resting peacefully in the history books for 1,500 years, the barbarian warlord, dubbed "the Scourge of God" after he plundered 5th-Century Europe, is again at the center of a battle. This time, the conflict is academic. The weapons are obscure citations in Byzantine texts. And the prize, if one could call him that, is Attila himself--and a new, prouder sense of Ukrainian identity.
OPINION
March 16, 2014
Re "Threat from within," Opinion, March 13 While Robert English has impressive credentials as director of USC's School of International Relations, I question his view that the woes of the Ukrainians can be laid largely at the feet of the "neofascists" and American politicians trying to make points. He fails to explain why Russian President Vladimir Putin has surrounded himself with ex-KGB people in an effort to consolidate power, why he jails or otherwise persecutes political opponents, or why he demands that the Russian oligarchs bring all their wealth back inside Russia or risk losing it. These are not the moves of a misunderstood leader, but rather the well-laid plans of an aspiring despot.
WORLD
October 31, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Amid fears that disputes over the vote count could trigger violence, citizens head to the polls here today in a presidential election marked by a fierce battle between pro-Western and Moscow-oriented candidates. Opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko, widely viewed as a free-market democratic reformer, is facing Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich, who is popular in Ukraine's largely Russian-speaking east, in an exceptionally harsh campaign.
WORLD
January 9, 2006 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
After last week's signing of a five-year natural gas agreement with Russia, President Viktor Yushchenko was basking in self-congratulation. "I would call it a brilliant achievement," he told Ukraine's NTN television. But former ally Yulia Tymoshenko thought otherwise. "Only a person with a huge New Year's hangover can call this a success," declared Tymoshenko, who was a partner in the 2004 Orange Revolution that brought Yushchenko to power and was his prime minister until last fall.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meetings of the management team at the Vatican tend to be almost quaint by the standards of modern industry or diplomacy: Pope John Paul II with a few well-read aides around a polished antique table. In recent weeks, strategy sessions have lengthened, sometimes stretching through lunch and beyond. The Pope is preparing for history.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 32 pupils in Mrs. Sidneva's third-grade class listened with rapt attention Monday as she described how Nazi soldiers shot more than 30,000 people in two days 50 years ago in a wooded area on the edge of Kiev. "The Nazis hated all of us--the Ukrainians, the Russians and the Byelorussians--but who did they hate the most?" Inna M. Sidneva asked the 8- and 9-year-olds sitting erect at their desks. Several hands shot up, and the teacher motioned to a boy sitting in the front row.
WORLD
December 13, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine - After more than three weeks of street protests against his rule, Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich on Friday met with opposition leaders, who came away declaring that little had been achieved. “Talking to these high-placed bureaucrats felt like traveling back to the U.S.S.R.,” opposition leader Vitali Klitschko said Friday night. “None of our demands were met. But the good thing is we personally delivered them to Yanukovich and looked into his eye.” The meeting at Ukraina Palace in downtown Kiev included Prime Minister Mykola Azarov, Ukraine's top clergy, former presidents and others.
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