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Ukraine Labor

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NEWS
June 16, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nation's embattled president backed down Tuesday in the face of political and economic demands by hundreds of thousands of striking miners and factory workers. As part of a series of concessions, President Leonid Kravchuk acceded to demands to hold a referendum on his own leadership and new elections to the widely discredited Parliament.
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NEWS
April 9, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Mikhalevich was a hard-working coal miner humiliated by his inability to feed his family; Pavlo Lazarenko was a masterful politician who became Ukraine's prime minister at 43. The two men, 10 years and a world apart, never crossed paths. Mikhalevich spent his working life half a mile underground, hacking coal from the earth; Lazarenko lived in a mansion outside Kiev, spruced up with half a million dollars that Ukrainian prosecutors allege he stole from the government.
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NEWS
June 12, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This nation's biggest labor protest of the post-Soviet era spread Friday as workers from at least half the 250 coal mines were reported on strike demanding better wages and a change in the country's leadership. More than 150,000 miners have walked out in protest against fourfold price increases that were imposed last weekend on everything from groceries to gasoline in order to stabilize the falling value of Ukraine's currency.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nation's embattled president backed down Tuesday in the face of political and economic demands by hundreds of thousands of striking miners and factory workers. As part of a series of concessions, President Leonid Kravchuk acceded to demands to hold a referendum on his own leadership and new elections to the widely discredited Parliament.
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander Mikhalevich was a hard-working coal miner humiliated by his inability to feed his family; Pavlo Lazarenko was a masterful politician who became Ukraine's prime minister at 43. The two men, 10 years and a world apart, never crossed paths. Mikhalevich spent his working life half a mile underground, hacking coal from the earth; Lazarenko lived in a mansion outside Kiev, spruced up with half a million dollars that Ukrainian prosecutors allege he stole from the government.
WORLD
July 8, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coal dust deep in a Ukrainian mine ignited Sunday, starting a fire that killed at least 33 miners--the worst accident so far this year in the former Soviet republic's troubled coal industry. Thirty of the miners were in a trolley that was descending into the Ukraina mine in the town of Ukrainsk at 2:30 a.m. when the fire broke out, said Col. Oleksey Pechenkin, spokesman for Ukraine's Emergencies Ministry.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This nation's biggest labor protest of the post-Soviet era spread Friday as workers from at least half the 250 coal mines were reported on strike demanding better wages and a change in the country's leadership. More than 150,000 miners have walked out in protest against fourfold price increases that were imposed last weekend on everything from groceries to gasoline in order to stabilize the falling value of Ukraine's currency.
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