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WORLD
July 6, 2011 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Moscow -- The abuse-of-power trial of former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko slid into chaos Wednesday when the Western-leaning politician was tossed from a Kiev courtroom after calling the judge a "monster" and her prosecution a "farce. " The former princess of the so-called Orange Revolution, which in late 2004 and early 2005 loosened Ukraine's ties to Russia, is also under investigation, government officials said, on possible charges of high treason and the alleged attempted embezzlement of $405 million while she and her colleagues were in power.
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WORLD
December 13, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
The Ukrainian prosecutor-general's office announced Sunday that it had reopened an investigation into allegations that presidential candidate Viktor Yushchenko was poisoned, after doctors in Austria confirmed he had ingested dioxin. Returning to Kiev after checking out of a Vienna clinic, Yushchenko said he was sure that members of the government were responsible for the dioxin poisoning that had disfigured his face and caused other symptoms.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The man on whom the Clinton Administration has pinned its hopes for Ukrainian nuclear disarmament may look like a lame duck when he arrives in Washington for an official visit Thursday. But President Leonid Kravchuk isn't nicknamed "the wily fox" for nothing.
WORLD
December 27, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko claimed victory early today in Ukraine's fiercely contested presidential revote, thanking jubilant supporters whose weeks of protests he credited with opening a new democratic era for this former Soviet state.
NEWS
April 20, 2008 | Alex Rodriguez, Chicago Tribune
The rustic beauty of Ukraine's famous wooden churches is surpassed only by their capacity for survival. Dotting the countryside from the Carpathian Mountains to Crimea, they have withstood centuries of unforgiving winters. During World War II, Nazi shelling raked the Ukrainian heartland. Under Soviet rule, the churches became grain silos and warehouses for everything from mattresses to pesticides. Now, in an era when democracy and religion thrive in Ukraine, wooden churches as old as six centuries face ruin at the hands of the unlikeliest of enemies: the priests and parishioners who became their guardians and, unaware of their historical significance, began "improving" them.
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