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NEWS
September 9, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Moscow politicians talk about a "common economic space" among the fracturing Soviet republics, the Ukrainian leadership has called for bids from Western bank-note printers to issue a separate currency. Soviet and Russian leaders also persist in promising a united Soviet armed forces. But in the Ukraine, an autonomous Defense Ministry has been created and at least 500,000 Red Army troops have transferred to its command.
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NEWS
September 9, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Moscow politicians talk about a "common economic space" among the fracturing Soviet republics, the Ukrainian leadership has called for bids from Western bank-note printers to issue a separate currency. Soviet and Russian leaders also persist in promising a united Soviet armed forces. But in the Ukraine, an autonomous Defense Ministry has been created and at least 500,000 Red Army troops have transferred to its command.
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OPINION
January 11, 2005
Re "Russia's Downhill Slide to Dictatorship," Commentary, Jan. 9: Niall Ferguson may be generally right in viewing the current regime in Russia. However, it is simply outrageous how he parallels Hitler's ambitions regarding Poland and Czechoslovakia on one side and Russia's feelings toward Ukraine on the other. Russia and Ukraine were one country for more than three centuries. For Russians to hear that, say, Kiev, Kharkov and Odessa are now in another country is the same as for Americans to imagine that Los Angeles is in Mexico or Chicago is in Canada.
OPINION
April 20, 2014 | Doyle McManus
It was tempting to look at last week's diplomatic agreement to pull Ukraine back from the brink of war and see the beginning of a grand compromise between Russia and the West. Tempting, but mistaken. Vladimir Putin is still winning most of what he wants in Ukraine, and he's winning it more cheaply and more elegantly than he would by launching a full-scale military invasion. Last week's agreement, which called on pro-Russia militias to end their occupation of government buildings, was probably only a speed bump on the way toward bringing all of Ukraine under Moscow's influence.
NEWS
June 24, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II, starting one of the most delicate missions of his 23-year reign, urged Ukraine's Roman Catholic and Orthodox Christian communities Saturday to bury centuries of religious feuding, and assured wary Orthodox believers that he had not come here to raid their flock in search of converts. "Let us recognize our faults as we ask forgiveness for the errors committed in both the distant and recent past," the pontiff from neighboring Poland said in fluent Ukrainian after he landed.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's efforts to bind together the remnants of the Soviet Union stalled when leaders of seven republics failed Monday to sign the treaty that would create a new political union and five other republics refused to send delegates to the meeting. The setback was one of the most serious Gorbachev has suffered since he began the tortuous negotiations on the draft treaty last spring.
WORLD
March 3, 2014 | Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
The Kremlin power play in Ukraine's strategic Crimea region escalated Sunday with Russian-backed authorities ordering Ukrainian army and navy units to surrender their weapons as an outraged international community warned Russian President Vladimir Putin that he risks censure for violating Ukraine's sovereignty. The United States accused Moscow of reinforcing an estimated 6,000 naval and ground troops in Crimea with additional personnel and announced that Secretary of State John F. Kerry would fly to Kiev, Ukraine's capital, on Tuesday in a show of support for the beleaguered Ukrainian government.
BOOKS
September 29, 1985 | James E. Mace, Mace is author of "Communism and the Dilemmas of National Liberation: National Communism in Soviet Ukraine, 1918-1933" (Harvard, 1983). and
Ludmilla Alexeyeva, herself a former Moscow dissident and now Western representative for the Moscow Helsinki Group, has given us the best treatment of Soviet dissent yet available in any language.
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Prokhmalskaya, a feisty 69-year-old, knew it was a sin to get into a fistfight, especially during Lent. But she plunged into a quarrel, lost control and hit a fellow villager in Urizh named Anna Sopotnitskaya. "I want your blood now. I want the entire world to look bleak for you," Prokhmalskaya, a Greek Catholic, shrieked at Sopotnitskaya, 45, a member of the Ukrainian Orthodox flock.
NEWS
May 1, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After hundreds of years as the brunt of Russian jokes and the subject of countless decrees from whatever czar or general secretary was sitting in the Kremlin, Ukrainians are forging a new relationship with Moscow--one of equals, whether Russia likes it or not. "Russians love to refer to the relations between Russia and Ukraine as the relations of an older brother and a younger brother," said Anatoly Z. Moskalenko, a prominent Ukrainian historian and journalist.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In American terms, it would be like tearing the Midwest from the map of the United States and proclaiming it an independent country. Gone would be the industrial muscle of Chicago and Detroit, along with the choicest part of the nation's granary. The ICBMs at Grand Forks would slip from Washington's control. To travel to St. Louis or a thousand other destinations, U.S. citizens would need passports.
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