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Ukraine Security

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NEWS
April 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried by territorial claims, political pressure and possible economic boycotts from its powerful neighbor Russia, Ukraine will demand international guarantees for its security as it gives up the nuclear arsenal inherited from the Soviet Union, Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk said Tuesday.
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NEWS
January 11, 1994 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
President Clinton on Monday announced agreement with Ukraine and Russia to dismantle Ukraine's entire nuclear arsenal, hailing the long-sought accord as "a hopeful and historic breakthrough that enhances the security of all three participants." The agreement, disclosed at the NATO summit here and scheduled to be signed in Moscow on Friday, must survive potentially serious opposition by nationalist factions that oppose elimination of the weapons and control the Ukrainian Parliament.
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NEWS
January 10, 1993 | CHRYSTINA LAPYCHAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ukraine's top arms negotiator, returning home from a visit to Washington, said Saturday that President Bush gave him a written summary of security guarantees that the United States intends to provide this country after Ukraine gives up its nuclear weapons. The letter fell short of immediate, binding guarantees that were sought by the official, Deputy Foreign Minister Boris Tarasiuk.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Clinton Administration offered Ukraine a package of economic aid and security assurances Monday in the hope of shaping the former Soviet republic's future as a Western-aligned state without nuclear arms. U.S.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has told Ukraine and Kazakhstan that it will come to their aid diplomatically if Russia ever threatens them with nuclear weapons but will not promise to defend them with military force, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Tuesday. The two republics have promised to hand their nuclear weapons over to Russia, but in exchange they have asked Western countries for security guarantees--complaining that they will feel vulnerable to their giant nuclear-armed neighbor.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
President Clinton on Monday announced agreement with Ukraine and Russia to dismantle Ukraine's entire nuclear arsenal, hailing the long-sought accord as "a hopeful and historic breakthrough that enhances the security of all three participants." The agreement, disclosed at the NATO summit here and scheduled to be signed in Moscow on Friday, must survive potentially serious opposition by nationalist factions that oppose elimination of the weapons and control the Ukrainian Parliament.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | ROBERT SEELY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Clinton Administration offered Ukraine a package of economic aid and security assurances Monday in the hope of shaping the former Soviet republic's future as a Western-aligned state without nuclear arms. U.S.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | Reuters
Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma launched a battle against crime and fired the Interior minister Thursday in his first major actions two days after being inaugurated. Kuchma issued a four-page decree pledging to bolster joint patrols of police and soldiers in areas of high criminal concentration to root out "banditism, extortion rackets and hostage-taking." In a separate decree, Kuchma fired Interior Minister Andriy Vasylyshyn, who held the job for three years.
WORLD
April 15, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Ukrainian forces launched combat operations against pro-Russian separatists Tuesday and recaptured a military airport in the eastern part of the country, the acting president said.  Explosions and gunfire were heard from around the airport, located between the owns of Kramatorsk and Slavyansk. Both towns were seized last week by armed separatists, said the UNIAN news agency.  A Ukrainian SU-24 jet flew over the airport firing at separatist positions, and troops using armored vehicles followed with a ground assault, the report said.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration said Tuesday that it will question Ukrainian President Leonid D. Kuchma during a scheduled visit to the White House about reports that the Kiev government has sold and leased aircraft to South American drug traffickers.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | CHRYSTINA LAPYCHAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ukraine's top arms negotiator, returning home from a visit to Washington, said Saturday that President Bush gave him a written summary of security guarantees that the United States intends to provide this country after Ukraine gives up its nuclear weapons. The letter fell short of immediate, binding guarantees that were sought by the official, Deputy Foreign Minister Boris Tarasiuk.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States has told Ukraine and Kazakhstan that it will come to their aid diplomatically if Russia ever threatens them with nuclear weapons but will not promise to defend them with military force, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Tuesday. The two republics have promised to hand their nuclear weapons over to Russia, but in exchange they have asked Western countries for security guarantees--complaining that they will feel vulnerable to their giant nuclear-armed neighbor.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worried by territorial claims, political pressure and possible economic boycotts from its powerful neighbor Russia, Ukraine will demand international guarantees for its security as it gives up the nuclear arsenal inherited from the Soviet Union, Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk said Tuesday.
WORLD
April 27, 2014 | Sergei L. Loiko
They sat at a long table, appearing tense and tired Sunday as they looked over the heads of gathered journalists toward the armed, masked men in unmarked uniforms sitting at the back of the nearly empty auditorium. Then the leader of the unsmiling group on stage spoke. They were “guests” of self-proclaimed mayor of Slovyansk, Vyacheslav Ponomaryov, “a man of honor” at whose initiative they were holding this news conference in “this bizarre situation,” said Col. Axel Schneider, a German.
WORLD
April 14, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW -- A threatened sweep by Ukrainian armed forces to oust pro-Russia gunmen occupying government buildings in eastern Ukraine failed to materialize after local police in the besieged venues apparently refused to take part in the proclaimed "anti-terrorist operation. " Ukraine's acting president, Oleksandr Turchynov, had issued an ultimatum on Sunday that gunmen holding key government facilities in Donetsk, Luhansk, Slavyansk, Kramatorsk and other cities in the volatile eastern and southern areas of Ukraine lay down their arms Monday or face ouster at gunpoint by Ukrainian troops and police.
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