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NEWS
March 3, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A foreign visitor to this city in the western Ukraine recently tried to make an overseas telephone call, a request the hotel operator rejected as impossible. The visitor then approached the hotel manager, who said she too was powerless to help. "I'm just a government official," the manager said. "You'd better ask Rukh." Rukh--the word means "the movement" in Ukrainian--has remarkable influence in the Soviet Union's second-largest republic despite being legalized less than a month ago.
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NEWS
June 28, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ukrainian legislature voted Thursday to delay until autumn all debate on the proposed Union Treaty, which President Mikhail S. Gorbachev had hoped would win quick national approval and lay the political foundation for pulling the Soviet Union out of its crisis.
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NEWS
September 10, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Speakers at a founding conference for the country's newest independent political movement, this one in the Ukraine, called Saturday for separating from the Soviet Union and for ousting the republic's longtime Communist Party boss. At the same time, a leading Kremlin conservative warned that this country's existence is threatened by its ethnic problems.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawmakers in the Ukraine voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to shut the Chernobyl power plant, site of the world's worst nuclear accident, as ethnic groups in the Soviet Union from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea pressed their demands on Moscow. In a sign of the new Kremlin attentiveness to the desires of increasingly combative local authorities, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev agreed with Russian Federation President Boris N.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS and CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station, the site of the world's most serious nuclear accident, will be phased out of operation over the next five years and then permanently closed under a decision announced Friday by authorities in the Ukraine, one of the Soviet Union's constituent republics.
NEWS
June 28, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ukrainian legislature voted Thursday to delay until autumn all debate on the proposed Union Treaty, which President Mikhail S. Gorbachev had hoped would win quick national approval and lay the political foundation for pulling the Soviet Union out of its crisis.
NEWS
September 11, 1989
Ivan Drach, a Ukrainian poet and political activist, was elected to lead a new grass-roots group fighting for greater autonomy for the Soviet republic, according to a spokesman in Moscow for the Ukrainian Helsinki Group that monitors human rights. He also said that Sergei Konyev, a member of the new Soviet Parliament, was chosen as a deputy to Drach.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawmakers in the Ukraine voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to shut the Chernobyl power plant, site of the world's worst nuclear accident, as ethnic groups in the Soviet Union from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea pressed their demands on Moscow. In a sign of the new Kremlin attentiveness to the desires of increasingly combative local authorities, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev agreed with Russian Federation President Boris N.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ukrainian Parliament boldly challenged the authority of the Soviet Union's central government Monday with a sweeping declaration of sovereignty that proclaimed the legal precedence on Ukrainian territory of its laws over all national legislation. The declaration goes further than most similar declarations: It spells out a vision of permanent neutrality for the Ukraine and demands full control over its industry, agriculture and natural resources.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Ukrainian lawmakers said the Chernobyl nuclear power plant must be closed and demanded to know why the issue was not on the agenda of the nation's Supreme Soviet legislature, the Tass news agency reported. Tass said the lawmakers favor shutting down Chernobyl because of harmful environmental effects following a fire and explosion at the plant in 1986.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ukrainian Parliament boldly challenged the authority of the Soviet Union's central government Monday with a sweeping declaration of sovereignty that proclaimed the legal precedence on Ukrainian territory of its laws over all national legislation. The declaration goes further than most similar declarations: It spells out a vision of permanent neutrality for the Ukraine and demands full control over its industry, agriculture and natural resources.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS and CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station, the site of the world's most serious nuclear accident, will be phased out of operation over the next five years and then permanently closed under a decision announced Friday by authorities in the Ukraine, one of the Soviet Union's constituent republics.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A foreign visitor to this city in the western Ukraine recently tried to make an overseas telephone call, a request the hotel operator rejected as impossible. The visitor then approached the hotel manager, who said she too was powerless to help. "I'm just a government official," the manager said. "You'd better ask Rukh." Rukh--the word means "the movement" in Ukrainian--has remarkable influence in the Soviet Union's second-largest republic despite being legalized less than a month ago.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Ukrainian lawmakers said the Chernobyl nuclear power plant must be closed and demanded to know why the issue was not on the agenda of the nation's Supreme Soviet legislature, the Tass news agency reported. Tass said the lawmakers favor shutting down Chernobyl because of harmful environmental effects following a fire and explosion at the plant in 1986.
NEWS
September 11, 1989
Ivan Drach, a Ukrainian poet and political activist, was elected to lead a new grass-roots group fighting for greater autonomy for the Soviet republic, according to a spokesman in Moscow for the Ukrainian Helsinki Group that monitors human rights. He also said that Sergei Konyev, a member of the new Soviet Parliament, was chosen as a deputy to Drach.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Speakers at a founding conference for the country's newest independent political movement, this one in the Ukraine, called Saturday for separating from the Soviet Union and for ousting the republic's longtime Communist Party boss. At the same time, a leading Kremlin conservative warned that this country's existence is threatened by its ethnic problems.
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