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Ukraine Ussr

NEWS
July 17, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ukrainian Parliament boldly challenged the authority of the Soviet Union's central government Monday with a sweeping declaration of sovereignty that proclaimed the legal precedence on Ukrainian territory of its laws over all national legislation. The declaration goes further than most similar declarations: It spells out a vision of permanent neutrality for the Ukraine and demands full control over its industry, agriculture and natural resources.
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NEWS
April 23, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet government, allocating $26 billion in additional funds to help the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster four years ago, acknowledged on Sunday that thousands upon thousands of people are still living in areas dangerously contaminated by radioactive fallout, and even more are eating food grown in those areas.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | From Religious News Service
St. George's Cathedral in Lvov has been returned to Ukrainian Catholics after being used by the Russian Orthodox Church for more than 40 years, according to an announcement by Ukrainian Catholic officials in Rome. The announcement from the temporary see in Rome of the Archeparchy of Lvov said the transfer of the cathedral was authorized April 6 by a 124-6 vote of the newly elected city council of Lvov.
NEWS
November 7, 1988 | Associated Press
Experts are baffled by a mysterious ailment that is causing dozens of children in a Ukrainian town to go bald. Residents are beginning to panic, the newspaper Socialist Industry reported Sunday. Soviet media say at least 82 children have been affected. The reports say the children--infants to those aged 15--have suffered no other unusual effects. The town, Chernovtsy, is near the Romanian border, about 200 miles from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Roman Dovah, a 9-year-old Ukrainian who wants to be a priest when he grows up, says his proudest possession is a cross his mother gave him last month. But Roman wears it only at home, or when he goes to services of the outlawed Ukrainian Catholic Church, to which his family belongs. He is afraid to wear the religious ornament to school, he said, because his classmates or teacher might see it when he changes clothes for gym class.
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