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Ukrainian Catholic Church

NEWS
November 29, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meetings of the management team at the Vatican tend to be almost quaint by the standards of modern industry or diplomacy: Pope John Paul II with a few well-read aides around a polished antique table. In recent weeks, strategy sessions have lengthened, sometimes stretching through lunch and beyond. The Pope is preparing for history.
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NEWS
June 5, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Roman Catholic and Russian Orthodox churches will open talks next month on the status of the long-suppressed Ukrainian Catholic Church in an apparent bid by Moscow to establish relations with the Vatican. Metropolitan Filaret of Kiev said Saturday that the two delegations will meet next month at a monastery in Finland for their preliminary discussions of the religiously and politically sensitive issue.
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | DON. A SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
In a stirring speech to militant Peronist labor unionists, Pope John Paul II on Friday decried the exploitation of workers by employers and exhorted union leaders not to use the dreams of their rank and file purely for the sake of gaining personal power.
OPINION
December 3, 1989
Among all the astonishing sights in this astonishing year, this was perhaps the most extraordinary: There in Rome on Friday was Mikhail S. Gorbachev, Lenin's heir, reverential but smiling, stepping forward to take the hand of John Paul II, Peter's successor, while a red-dressed Raisa and beaming princes of the church looked on.
NEWS
March 30, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One clear autumn day in 1938, a newly ordained priest named Myroslav Lubachivsky rode a bus to the train station in the Ukrainian city of Lvov and there, two valises firmly in hand, embarked on a journey west that would last more than half a century. "I thought I would be gone three years to complete my doctorate--five at most," Lubachivsky recalled this week.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing a week of religious and national renewal in the Ukraine, returning Catholic Cardinal Myroslav Lubachivsky on Sunday conducted a Byzantine Mass in a Lvov cathedral for the first time in half a century. Inside the freshly gilded, exuberantly baroque Cathedral of St. George, the seat of his church, Lubachivsky raised his voice in triumph through the prayers and incense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1985 | Associated Press
Archbishop Myroslav Ivan Lubachivsky, cardinal-designate and head of the Ukrainian Catholic Church, stretched out his hand for a perfunctory greeting, then turned quickly to what weighed on his mind. "Bad news from the old country," he sighed. Spiritual leader to an estimated 4.3 million Ukrainian Catholics worldwide, Lubachivsky has been waiting for good news from his homeland in the Soviet Ukraine for more than half his 70 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 44 years, the Catholics of Mshana have had no place to pray. Like all other Ukrainian Catholic Churches, the tin-domed church of Mshana was absorbed into the Russian Orthodox Church in 1946, on the orders of the dictator Josef Stalin, as part of his drive to eliminate Ukrainian nationalism. "Our church has never been Orthodox, and it never will be," Denko Koblitsky, a defiant Catholic farmer said recently, pointing with pride to the tiny, 200-year-old building.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Associated Press
Pope John Paul II will open the first meeting of Ukrainian bishops in more than four decades by receiving each bishop privately, the Vatican said Saturday. The change from the Pope's usual opening with the entire group is a sign of special concern for the Ukrainian church, which was suppressed by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin in 1946. "The Pope wanted to begin with a human rapport," papal spokesman Joaquin Navarro said. "They can talk, greet each other, get to know each other."
NEWS
December 13, 1989 | Reuters
Pope John Paul II appointed an Australian archbishop and veteran diplomat Tuesday as his main negotiator with the Russian Orthodox Church over the thorny issue of Ukrainian Catholics. Archbishop Edward Cassidy, 65, the Pope's deputy secretary of state for the last 17 months, was named to head the Vatican's Bureau for Christian Unity, a key position in Roman Catholic attempts to improve relations with the Russian church.
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