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January 17, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich on Friday signed into law hastily approved measures to ban unauthorized protests, a move aimed at wiping out the remnants of a civic uprising against his rejection of closer ties with the European Union in favor of alignment with Russia. The bills endorsed by what opponents contend was an inconclusive show of hands by lawmakers at the Verkhovna Rada assembly on Thursday were swiftly criticized as a violation of Ukrainians' human rights by free-speech advocates and senior Western diplomats.
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WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The vast majority of Ukrainian voters oppose Russian military intervention in their country, even in the east and south where large Russian minorities live, a U.S.-funded poll by a Gallup affiliate showed Thursday. The April 3-12 survey of 1,200 randomly selected Ukrainians of voting age by Baltic Surveys/The Gallup Organization found a nationwide average of 85% against any Russian military intervention, the International Republican Institute said in a summary of the poll paid for by the U.S. Agency for International Development.
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WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The vast majority of Ukrainian voters oppose Russian military intervention in their country, even in the east and south where large Russian minorities live, a U.S.-funded poll by a Gallup affiliate showed Thursday. The April 3-12 survey of 1,200 randomly selected Ukrainians of voting age by Baltic Surveys/The Gallup Organization found a nationwide average of 85% against any Russian military intervention, the International Republican Institute said in a summary of the poll paid for by the U.S. Agency for International Development.
WORLD
April 24, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
SLOVYANSK, Ukraine -- Ukrainian government troops killed at least two pro-Russia separatist gunmen in Slovyansk on Thursday and drove away others occupying key public buildings in the city of Mariupol in an operation the Kremlin condemned as the Kiev government attacking "its own people. " Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said the actions in eastern Ukraine and the deployment of NATO forces in member states bordering Russia to the west had "forced" the Kremlin to order more military drills of its troops amassed on Ukraine's border.
WORLD
April 15, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW -- Ukraine's interim government on Tuesday made good on threats to move against pro-Russia separatists occupying eastern cities, prompting Russian President Vladimir Putin to demand U.N. condemnation of the use of force in the neighboring country. In a call to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Putin "emphasized that the Russian side expects the United Nations and the international community to clearly condemn the Kiev authorities' anti-constitutional military operation in Ukraine's southeast," the Itar-Tass news agency reported . Russia-backed militants who have seized government and security facilities in at least 10 towns and cities in eastern Ukraine were under fire in the city of Slavyansk, Russian news media reported, casting the operation to recover Ukrainian government control as a violent strike against civilians.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By David Horsey
Watching the dramatic events in Ukraine unfold, I have harbored the hope that one or two of the thousands of people protesting in Kiev's Independence Square might have been encouraged to act on their dreams of liberty by words I spoke during a week in the city in September 2012.  I was in Ukraine as a guest of the U.S. State Department. Like hundreds of artists, authors, actors and journalists the United States has sent abroad over many decades, my job was simply to talk about the why and how of my job. I had jumped at the chance to go someplace I had never been and figured whatever message I had to deliver would come to me once I got there.
WORLD
March 22, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW -- Shots were fired and at least one person was injured Saturday afternoon as Russian troops stormed a Ukrainian air force base near the Crimean port city of Sevastopol. At least six Russian armored vehicles reportedly took part in the attack, the initial part of which could be viewed live via webcam. The video feed showed a Russian armored personnel carrier breaking down the gates of the base at Belbek as another Russian armored vehicle provided cover with a heavy machine gun. The broadcast was terminated after a Russian soldier in a black mask climbed the lamp post on which the camera was installed and disabled it. Five more armored vehicles then joined the attack, breaking down parts of a perimeter fence, allowing Russian footsoldiers armed with automatic rifles and machine guns to rush in, Oleg Klimov, a Russian freelance journalist who witnessed the scene, told The Times.
WORLD
February 23, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MEZHGORYE, Ukraine - The center of Kiev was relatively calm Sunday after the months of protests that reached their violent apex last week, leaving scores dead in the streets, driving Ukraine's president out of the capital and placing the opposition in tenuous control of this troubled nation. But on the highways leading north of the city, it was a different matter. The roadways were clogged with cars, drivers madly honking, edging their way forward and then parking anywhere they could, leaving people to continue on foot.
WORLD
February 19, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - The State Department on Wednesday banned 20 Ukrainian civilians from obtaining U.S. visas in an effort to ramp up pressure on the Eastern European country's government to de-escalate the bloody confrontations between police and opposition protesters. A senior State Department official would not name those banned from traveling to the U.S., but said the list included the “full chain of command” of those considered responsible for recent deadly clashes. The move was a careful first step as U.S. and European Union officials warned that more punitive sanctions could be forthcoming if a truce announced late Wednesday did not hold.
WORLD
January 27, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine - The protest movement seeking to push Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich from power is providing a stage for what one analyst calls "wild protest factions" that are at times driving developments on the street and complicating efforts to negotiate a solution. Members of one group don black masks and have combat experience fighting for Ukrainian nationalist or anti-Russian causes in several conflicts across the former Soviet Union. A leader denied the group is anti-Semitic, even while declaring that most Ukrainian bankers are Jewish.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected, as noted below
DONETSK, Ukraine - Ukraine government forces on Wednesday recaptured a southeastern town that had been held by separatist rebels, the Interior Ministry said. There were no casualties in the operation in the town of Svyatogorsk, according to an statement posted on the ministry's website. The ouster of the rebels was a welcome strategic gain by the Kiev government in the troubled Donetsk region, close to Ukraine's eastern border with Russia. “The recapture of Svyatogorsk is an indication that the anti-terrorist operation, which experienced certain problems last week, is now gaining momentum,” said Dmitry Tymchuk, head of Kiev-based Center for Military and Political Research.
WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
DONETSK, Ukraine - Ukrainian government troops on Wednesday claimed to have swept out pro-Russia gunmen from a town in embattled eastern Ukraine, an operation the Kremlin warned could spark retaliation. The Ukrainian Interior Ministry statement that Svyatogorsk was under government control was dismissed as "a propaganda lie" by a leader of insurgents holding nearby Slovyansk, scene of the most violent and destabilizing clashes of the separatist movement that has been gaining momentum since Russia's annexation of Crimea last month.
WORLD
April 22, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
KIEV, Ukraine -- The United States will stand by Ukrainians against Russian aggression that threatens their nation's sovereignty and territorial integrity, Vice President Joe Biden pledged Tuesday during a visit to Kiev. “No nation has the right to simply grab land from another nation, and we will never recognize Russia's illegal occupation of Crimea, and neither will the world,” Biden said after meeting with Ukraine's acting prime minister, Arseny Yatsenyuk. “No nation should threaten its neighbors by amassing troops along the border.
WORLD
April 21, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
KIEV, Ukraine - Vice President Joe Biden on Monday embarked on a mission to show U.S. support for Ukraine's embattled interim leaders as pro-Russia gunmen took over more government buildings in eastern Ukraine and the Kremlin's top diplomat blamed Washington for the mounting crisis. Biden was to meet Tuesday with acting Ukrainian President Oleksandr Turchynov and Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk, as well as civil society leaders in Kiev, the capital, before flying back to Washington.
WORLD
April 20, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The fragile diplomatic accord to resolve the Ukraine crisis frayed Sunday as an armed clash erupted in eastern Ukraine and top Russian and Ukrainian officials, appearing on television talk shows, each demanded the other side lay down its weapons. Russia's ambassador to the United States, Sergey Kislyak, said a gunfight early Easter morning that left at least three people dead at a checkpoint outside the eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk showed the need for all sides to disarm.
WORLD
April 15, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
MOSCOW -- Ukraine's interim government on Tuesday made good on threats to move against pro-Russia separatists occupying eastern cities, prompting Russian President Vladimir Putin to demand U.N. condemnation of the use of force in the neighboring country. In a call to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Putin "emphasized that the Russian side expects the United Nations and the international community to clearly condemn the Kiev authorities' anti-constitutional military operation in Ukraine's southeast," the Itar-Tass news agency reported . Russia-backed militants who have seized government and security facilities in at least 10 towns and cities in eastern Ukraine were under fire in the city of Slavyansk, Russian news media reported, casting the operation to recover Ukrainian government control as a violent strike against civilians.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This country's future will be placed today in the hands of, among others, Alexander I. Demyensky, a ruddy-faced foreman at the sprawling shipyards here on the banks of the Dnieper River. With the hour of decision fast approaching, the 42-year-old Ukrainian, like many of his countrymen, was still puzzling over what to do.
NEWS
December 21, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A leading Ukrainian nationalist, jailed in the early 1970s for his protests over the "Russification" of the Ukraine, returned to the attack Tuesday, asserting in an article in the Soviet Communist Party's leading journal that the Ukrainian culture is being squeezed into extinction by the present Soviet system.
WORLD
April 3, 2014 | By Victoria Butenko and Sergei L. Loiko
KIEV, Ukraine -- Security details and special police with the government of Ukraine's then-President Viktor Yanukovich were responsible for the deaths of protesters shot in February, officials with the nation's interim leadership said Thursday. Three riot police officers were formally arrested and nine others detained overnight on suspicion of carrying out sniper fire that killed scores of people in Kiev on Feb. 20 during violent clashes between protesters and police, acting Prosecutor General Oleh Mahnitsky said at news conference in the capital while discussing preliminary results of the new government's investigation.
WORLD
April 2, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - Ukraine's ousted president on Wednesday lamented the loss of Crimea to Russia as “a grave pain and tragedy very difficult to come to terms with” but insisted the current interim government in Kiev was solely responsible for the annexation of the region. “I personally can't agree” on the annexation of Crimea, Viktor Yanukovich said in a televised interview with the Associated Press and NTV, a Russian television network. “If this were happening under me, I would have tried to prevent it.” Yanukovich acknowledged that he had asked Russian President Vladimir Putin to deploy troops on the Ukrainian peninsula to stop “the outrages by armed gangs of nationalists.” “I also did this because I myself became an object of an attack by bandits,” he said in the interview, conducted in the Russian city Rostov-on-Don.
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