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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1999 | DIANE WEDNER
Students and staff at North Hollywood High School rolled out the red carpet Monday for 10 Ukrainian exchange students, visiting for three weeks to attend classes and sample local culture. The 10 teenagers and their chaperon, who arrived here Friday, stood at wide-eyed attention as the school drill team twirled bright red banners at the lunchtime welcoming ceremony.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1999 | DIANE WEDNER
Students and staff at North Hollywood High School rolled out the red carpet Monday for 10 Ukrainian exchange students, visiting for three weeks to attend classes and sample local culture. The 10 teenagers and their chaperon, who arrived here Friday, stood at wide-eyed attention as the school drill team twirled bright red banners at the lunchtime welcoming ceremony.
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NEWS
October 16, 1988 | From Reuters
More than 150 angry delegates to a recent city council meeting in a town in the Ukraine, called on to rubber-stamp prepared policy decisions, instead "voted with their feet" and marched out of the session, the Soviet news agency Tass reported Saturday. The walkout was an example of increasing activism under Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who has pressed for democratic procedures to be applied at all levels as part of his drive to reform Soviet society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1990 | LYNDA NATALI
When Zenovia Wrzesniewski was forced to leave the Ukraine during the Bolshevik revolution after her father was sent to Siberia, she left behind many things that were precious to her. But she was able to re-create at least one thing from her homeland. The ingredients were simple and she knew them by heart: a spout from an aluminum can, a stick, a piece of string, melted wax, dye--and patience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1990 | LYNDA NATALI
When Zenovia Wrzesniewski was forced to leave the Ukraine during the Bolshevik revolution after her father was sent to Siberia, she left behind many things that were precious to her. But she was able to re-create at least one thing from her homeland. The ingredients were simple and she knew them by heart: a spout from an aluminum can, a stick, a piece of string, melted wax, dye--and patience.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1994
Why does Steven Spielberg say that the movie "Schindler's List" was his "duty to make" ("Spielberg's 'List' a Call to 'Duty,' " March 7)? Does he realize the saturation level of the Jewish Holocaust in the media and elsewhere, the Holocaust Museum in L.A., the Holocaust Memorial in Washington, schoolchildren being taught about the Holocaust, plus other stories about it in the press and on television? This genocide of the Jews has been shoved into our faces ad nauseam. What is sadly lacking is a similar telling of other equally horrifying genocides--the Armenian genocide, the starvation genocide of the Ukranians by the former Soviet Union, the genocide of the Cambodians.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Soviet citizens, while obsessed with their country's dismal economic plight, overwhelmingly oppose private ownership of basic industries and have serious reservations about transforming their state-operated economy into a free-market system, a new poll indicates.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
All their careers, California political consultants Sal Russo and Tony Marsh have worked for candidates who have extolled freedom and warned voters not to trust the Soviet empire. But it was like a bolt out of the blue when they recently were invited to the Ukraine to help pitch a similar message. Now, they are celebrating one of their strangest and most satisfying election victories ever--the landslide vote in the Ukraine to declare independence from Moscow and the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1990 | EDWARD N. LUTTWAK, Edward N. Luttwak holds the Arleigh Burke Chair in Strategy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.
Nations can survive revolutions, centuries of foreign occupation and any number of partitions and still re-emerge intact because they are living cultural organisms. Empires that rule over diverse nationalities have no such guarantee of survival. They are machines. Like all machinery, they need constant maintenance--first of all to suppress the natural separatism of the peoples they rule. Only the methods of control vary.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | SUSAN REITER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the 12 years since the Moscow Virtuosi chamber orchestra was formed, its members, like most Russians, have seen their world turn so many times they might be forgiven if they feel a bit lightheaded. Career-wise, things have improved immeasurably--the orchestra's founding conductor and principal violinist Vladimir Spivakov recalls that early on, the orchestra had no official governmental status. So even though requests for performances started coming from outside the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | From Reuters
More than 150 angry delegates to a recent city council meeting in a town in the Ukraine, called on to rubber-stamp prepared policy decisions, instead "voted with their feet" and marched out of the session, the Soviet news agency Tass reported Saturday. The walkout was an example of increasing activism under Kremlin leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who has pressed for democratic procedures to be applied at all levels as part of his drive to reform Soviet society.
SPORTS
February 24, 1992 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They respectfully watched a flag that wasn't theirs rise to the rafters of the Olympic Arena, listening to an anthem whose words they didn't know. But even though their victory was honored by the raising of the Olympic flag and the playing of the Olympic anthem, the gold medals worn around the necks of the hockey players on the Unified Team Sunday were indisputably theirs after a 3-1 victory over Canada that gave the former Soviet Union its eighth hockey gold medal in the last 10 tournaments.
WORLD
March 8, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - As passengers' relatives waited for news on the Malaysian Airlines jet that went missing Saturday en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, reports emerged that military aircraft had spotted two oil slicks off southern Vietnam. The Associated Press reported that a Vietnamese government statement said the slicks were  each between 6 miles and 9 miles long.  The statement said the slicks were consistent with the kinds that would be left by fuel from a crashed jetliner. The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 disappeared from radar screens with 239 people on board.
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